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EmJae
Dec. 1, 2009, 06:59 PM
I may be moving within the next year and half, and so I've been looking for barns that might not be a ridiculous drive (which in CA can be a nightmare during traffic time). I've only ever been at really laid back, non-show barns, but I'm thinking I might be wanting to show a bit more in the future. I saw that a show barn (which I think is geared more for the beginning rider) seems to request that the rider be neatly turned out (i.e, shirt tucked in, belt, etc.). None of the other A-barn seems to mention this expectation.

Is this a common rule (unspoken or spoken) at show barns? Does your show barn have a dress code?

BrookdaleBay
Dec. 1, 2009, 07:07 PM
This probably isn't the same thing, but my horse is boarded at a competitive polo barn and you are laughed at if you show up wearing breeches or tall boots.

But in response to your question, I think a neat turn out is pretty common at a show barn.

woodhillsmanhattan
Dec. 1, 2009, 07:13 PM
My barn personally doesn't have a dress code and granted there are people that come out in jeans and a t-shirt but I personally ride in a polo or fitted shirt, breeches, clean tall boots, hairnet and helmet every day. If I had my own barn I would imply a dress code. Attention to detail, It sets up for success I truly believe.

Void
Dec. 1, 2009, 07:13 PM
There is no dress code at our barn, though other trainer's at the same facility do.

Lazy Palomino Hunter
Dec. 1, 2009, 07:15 PM
A little different, but my college barn had a dress code (which applied only when you were in lessons)

Hair up
Collared shirt (no sleeveless either)
Khakis or breeches
Tall boots or half chaps


You could wear full chaps between winter break and spring break, since they're warmer.

Pirateer
Dec. 1, 2009, 07:19 PM
I wish mine did.

gg4918
Dec. 1, 2009, 07:25 PM
Yes, but unspoken

-Tucked in shirt (may be a T-shirt in the super hot winter months)
-Breeches or jeans with half chaps
-Tall boots or chaps (nicely polished)
-Hair up in a hairnet
-Belt
-No bra straps hanging out
Basically everything must be clean, neat, and presentable.

Horses also have a dress code
-No crazy colors (we have people coming to look at horses or at the barn and we dont want to freak them out with some traffic cone orange polos)
-Baby pad (tasteful ones) or just a basic saddle pad
-Of course, shiny, fat, and healthy!!


Basically everything must be clean, neat, and presentable. Its respect for you, your trainer, your peers, and most importantly, your horse

hellerkm
Dec. 1, 2009, 07:35 PM
We do not have a dress code at our farm, there are only 5 kids who ride there right now. My girls wear jods/breeches , half or full chaps ( full chaps today in the 38 degree windy weather) long sleeve fitted sweatshits, boots ( paddock or tall ) and their hair is ALWAYS in a hair net! I can't stand teaching kids who are messing with their hair!!! so for me hair nets are a MUST !
My kids wear their helmets from the time they are tacking up until their ponies are back in the field, and we never do to the barn without paddock or muck boots. Just my own pet peeves LOL!!!

heartinrye
Dec. 1, 2009, 07:35 PM
I wish mine did.

Seriously. I know that not everyone can afford to wear nice clothes every day, but don't look like you rolled out of bed either.

kookicat
Dec. 1, 2009, 07:42 PM
Nope, and I wouldn't board at a place that did. What would they do if I turned up in my work clothes one day? (Depending on what I'm doing, that can range from a shirt, skirt and heels to steel toe capped boots, jeans and a company rugby shirt.)

I think as long as you're tidy and mostly clean, who cares?

Peggy
Dec. 1, 2009, 07:47 PM
No. Most people ride in either breeches or jeans and half chaps. Neat shirts, but not nec tucked in. My advise is to ask some people at any barn what the standard attire is b/c my experience is that there generally is a range of acceptable/normal attire even if it's not official.

Bogie
Dec. 1, 2009, 07:52 PM
No thank goodness. But then again I'm at an all adult barn and no one there is wearing anything offensive.

HowDoILook
Dec. 1, 2009, 08:01 PM
We have the unspoken dress code. There is a group of us that exercise all the barn horses every day and we wear
~Breeches (mostly)/Jeans
~Boots and Half Chap
~Tucked in shirt, usually collared
~Sweater/fitted jackets for when its cold
~BELT!!!!
~Hair up in hairnet
~Gloves
Lessons we wear the same things, but usually a nicer shirt, and our beige or toned-down colored breeches. Not my favorite purple ones :(
Some things my trainer cant stand
~Hair down in a long ponytail
~No Gloves
~HOODED SWEATSHIRTS (we are only allowed to wear them if no ones having lessons and you didnt bring another jacket to ride in and you cant mooch a fitted jacket off a friend)
~Big poofy winter jackets

SarahandSam
Dec. 1, 2009, 08:44 PM
Officially, hair should be up neatly with a hairnet or in a neat ponytail, shirt (no spaghetti straps) tucked in with a belt, helmet and heeled boots. That's for a busy lesson/show barn. Unofficial dress code for the more serious students is breeches or jeans with clean/polished half chaps or boots, polos or other neat and tidy shirt tucked in, hair up under helmet, gloves, no wild 'n' crazy colours for saddle pads or polos.

Us adults slip in sometimes with polka dots and hot pink saddle pads, but we're adults, so we get to push the limits. d;

superpony123
Dec. 1, 2009, 08:51 PM
No official dress code, but neat and tidy and appropriate is a must. Trainer will tell you it's time to invest in a belt or a new pair of breeches if it's inappropriate (i don't know why people wear low rise breeches when they constantly have to reach back and pull up their pants because their bum is showing!!!). But generally speaking, there's no nazi restrictions.

Lesson kids don't have to have a hairnet (though it is suggested), but if you are riding more than 2x a week, or if you're getting a horse, hairnets are a must. Some little girls are getting their first horses. Trainer gave them a present: hairnets, a hunter hair lesson, and a mini grooming kit. :)

Riley0522
Dec. 1, 2009, 09:41 PM
No, other than a helmet and appropriate footwear. I pay to board there, no one needs to tell me what I have to wear to go play with my mud ball horse. I mean he is a HORSE...he rolls in his own crap, I don't think I need to be required to be in tan breeches, a polo and expensive tall boots everyday to ride him. Often times I do just roll out of bed and go see him, but I do wear breeches, a tshirt, half chaps and boots.

If someone was a problem and showing too much skin, I'm sure something would be said, but we don't have that problem at our barn. I would never board somewhere that had a dress code, but I also like to groom my own horse which a lot of big barns have hired help to do.

HARROLDhasmyheart
Dec. 1, 2009, 10:46 PM
At my old barn (an A-circuit show barn) we had a dress code for lessons: britches, belt, polo shirt tucked in, hair up in a hair net, and everything cleaned and polished. Hacking was more lax and we (at the time group of high school girls) would either hack in britches and boots/half chaps, or jeans and half chaps. Whatever we rode in had to have sleeves--no tank tops.

At my current barns-plural because at school and at home, both are still A-circuit barns) there is not a 'dress code' but I tend to stick to the shirt tucked in with a belt, boots, and britches when lessoning. Also, I think a little piece of me would die if I didn't tuck my hair up in a hairnet properly when I ride, regardless of where or when. It just feels funny to me now!

ETA: Crazy colors of anything are frowned upon, more so at my old barn. When hacking on Sunday's and the trainer wasn't teaching I would use my mint chip green saddle pad or crazy polo's on occasion ;)

KateKat
Dec. 1, 2009, 10:52 PM
at a big show barn in my area, dress code is implicit but I definitely felt the pressure to up my dress when I was there. Much more conservative colors, fitted shirt and everyone did hunter hair, except for the little little kids. And I think I was the only rider over the age of 13 to have a Troxel LOL!

citydog
Dec. 1, 2009, 11:16 PM
No, other than a helmet and appropriate footwear. I pay to board there, no one needs to tell me what I have to wear to go play with my mud ball horse. I mean he is a HORSE...he rolls in his own crap, I don't think I need to be required to be in tan breeches, a polo and expensive tall boots everyday to ride him. Often times I do just roll out of bed and go see him, but I do wear breeches, a tshirt, half chaps and boots.


Exactly. No dress code as long as it's safe.

We pay a lot to work with our horses, not play fashion show or worry about offending others' precious sensibilities with a <shock! horror!> colored saddle pad.

dghunter
Dec. 1, 2009, 11:35 PM
No dress code thankfully. I have a gray who thinks it's the greatest thing ever to roll and roll and roll in the mud. I wear the oldest thing I can find when I know he's going to be a mudball :yes: I love my crazy colors too. My guys wear everything from bright green to pink to yellow :D

mojo7777
Dec. 1, 2009, 11:36 PM
I wish mine did.

Same here, but only to get rid of the pink camo you see everywhere. :eek:

AllyandPete
Dec. 1, 2009, 11:37 PM
Us adults slip in sometimes with polka dots and hot pink saddle pads, but we're adults, so we get to push the limits. d;

you cant forget the teal and purple polos.


Our "proper attire" that SarahandSam mentioned is posted a couple places in the barn. It's not super strict though. When I used to board my horse there I would ocassionally ride in spaghetti straps and my trainer at the time(the BNT of the barn) never said anything to me...except for the time that I wore a pair of jeans that I didn't think were low rise on the ground...but even with a belt they somehow became verrrrrry low rise when I was riding:eek:

LittleblackMorgan
Dec. 1, 2009, 11:40 PM
No dress code at my place, I do wish there was though...the one person that comes to mind wears a sports bra and slightly too tight pants, ie, the infamous Muffin Top (sprinkled with a Camel Toe). She should probably not go ahead and wear said outfit, she is not, er,fit for such a display.

I've been a jeans and paddocks kinda person the past few years, sometimes breeches and chaps of the half variety. But since I JUST entered into formal lessons again at another barn, I started rocking the field boots/breeches/semi fitted top...I'm serious about the training, and I personally think that if I showed up dressed like a scrub, the trainer I am paying a small fortune to would think I was a joke. I mean, I had dirt on my boots last week and was mortified...thankfully it was raining...this coming from a self-professed slob who cannot find the bedroom floor (but has THE cleanest pony EVER.)

Pandora1087
Dec. 2, 2009, 08:45 AM
I am not a fan of dress codes at the barn. When its cold I am going to wear what keeps me warm. When its hot I am going to wear what keeps me coolest. I hate wearing gloves and don't unless its really cold or I am showing. I personally always wear a hair net, but that is so I am used to it at horse shows, and don't have to wrestle with it. With that said, at horse shows I think you are representing your barn, and need to be dressed appropriately. I dislike when people show in the jumpers in tanktops with their boobs hanging out, and but hanging out of their low rise britches.

Timex
Dec. 2, 2009, 11:19 AM
i have never boarded at a barn that had a dress code, nor do i have one at my barn now. my clients are grown ups, most of them have kids and/or jobs, i'm not going to play fashion police when they have better things to worry about. and in my years as a junior, none of the fancy-shmancy show barns where i rode ever had a dress code. i'm sure if someone came dressed inappropriately, something would be said, but as long as you were dressed neatly and safely, then no one ever had an issue.

hntrjmprpro45
Dec. 2, 2009, 12:58 PM
I don't require a strict dress code but I do have some basic requirements. For my beginners/young students all I require is basic safety minded clothing (breeches or jeans, boots with heel and helmet). For my students who are showing I require that they wear breeches or jeans, tall boots or half chaps, with a close fitting top/jacket and helmet. I don't particularly care if it is a polo, collared shirt, etc but it must be close fitting. Besides a safety issue, it is incredibly difficult to critique a riders eq if they are wearing a baggy /blowing shirt or jacket. Most of my riders put their hair up under their helmets which I like (again it gives a nicer silhouette which is easier to critique). Horses must be clean but I don't need a show turn out for lessons.

Now if I were a strictly A-rated show barn then I might step it up but we are a mixed group (A-rated riders, local show riders, and beginners) so I think my rules reflect that. If I had a student that wore offensive clothing (too much skin, etc) I would quietly ask them to wear something more conservative since we have little kids in the barn too.

rugbygirl
Dec. 2, 2009, 01:01 PM
My trainer has a dress code, the barn doesn't (besides helmets and boots).

I wish the barn had a code. Some of the teenage girls dress really inappropriately. The barn would be a good place to teach them to respect themselves enough to dress nicely. I mean, they obviously spend a lot of time squeezing into tiny outfits and applying a lot of makeup, but I'd rather see them looking neat and professional. No, it doesn't affect me, but when I was a teenager I was involved in activities like Marching Band where we learned to have some discipline in our clothing choices depending on the situation. It served me very well later in life.

My trainer doesn't care what we wear hacking, but you'll get razzed for bright colours or sparkles. We all broke out the sparkles and colours when we trekked out to the X-C course and she rolled her eyes. No hoodies (bunny-hugs) whatsoever, that's a safety concern in her opinion. Half chaps or tall boots, should be presentably clean for lessons. Breeches or well-fitted jeans. No tank tops, no bra hanging out. Tack needs to be in good shape, properly fitted and reasonably clean. She makes the kids clean their tack more often than she bugs the adults ;). Anyone leasing a horse or borrowing tack is on a strict tack cleaning/maintenance schedule.

Trainer cares a lot more that the horses are dressed appropriately (we has WEATHER) and that her students aren't dressed like little trollops or complete slobs. Pretty relaxed, but a few people have been taken aside for talkings-to. Oh, and if your horse has bedding in his tail for lessons, watch out! :lol:

Oldenburg99
Dec. 2, 2009, 01:09 PM
[QUOTE=superpony123;4531919]No official dress code, but neat and tidy and appropriate is a must. Trainer will tell you it's time to invest in a belt or a new pair of breeches if it's inappropriate (i don't know why people wear low rise breeches when they constantly have to reach back and pull up their pants because their bum is showing!!!). QUOTE]


I'm so glad you said something about this! My trainer can't stand the thought of seeing someone's underwear! Low rise jeans or breeches are not allowed at our barn. She's also said no low cut shirts or spaghetti strap tank tops. No showing off your ta-ta's at the barn! These rules apply to schooling and showing. IMO, It teaches the young ones good habits and self respect. I've moved onto a new barn and I still have the same habits, even though there isn't a dress code.

As well as hairnets. or atleast a pony tail. Nothing like being blinded by your own hair while cantering around.

And absolutely no flip flops. period.

clompclomp
Dec. 2, 2009, 01:16 PM
no boobs, bellies, butts is our motto

JumpingBug
Dec. 2, 2009, 01:17 PM
I think the Red Barn (Stanford) "MAY" have a no tank top polo shirt dress code but now sure if that applies to everyone or not.

analise
Dec. 2, 2009, 01:19 PM
Neither the barn I'm at now nor the one I used to ride at have dress codes, as such.

Both require closed toed shoes (paddock boots/tall boots if riding) and long pants for riding though. And helmets for those under 18. Nothing else is explicitly stated though my previous barn was a h/j place so a lot of folks did ride in breeches and just about everybody had either tall boots or chaps of some sort.

I wouldn't like to ride at a place that wouldn't let me show up in paddock boots, jeans, and a t-shirt.

Movin Artfully
Dec. 2, 2009, 02:03 PM
I went to private schools/boarding school with a full tie and coat growing up. Even our boys sports teams had to wear suit coats when going to away games. It was considered professional conduct. This was 10 years ago...not 50. I now wear scrubs every day to work :)

Being told to tuck in a shirt or wear a polo is hardly offensive and in many cases...less offensive :)

Most barns I have ridden at have had an informal dress code- although only one specified, "No tank tops. Long pants, heeled boots, and helmets required. Polos preferred."

When I am riding at home...I wear whatever I want. If I were to open a public barn... I would require a dress code. As in..."keep it covered/keep it classy." I don't care if you buy your whole outfit for $.50 off ebay...just no parts swinging in the breeze.

ddashaq
Dec. 2, 2009, 02:14 PM
No, other than a helmet and appropriate footwear. I pay to board there, no one needs to tell me what I have to wear to go play with my mud ball horse. I mean he is a HORSE...he rolls in his own crap, I don't think I need to be required to be in tan breeches, a polo and expensive tall boots everyday to ride him. Often times I do just roll out of bed and go see him, but I do wear breeches, a tshirt, half chaps and boots.

If someone was a problem and showing too much skin, I'm sure something would be said, but we don't have that problem at our barn. I would never board somewhere that had a dress code, but I also like to groom my own horse which a lot of big barns have hired help to do.

Your post just cracked me up! I feel pretty much the same way but my barn does have some limits. Helmet and riding boots are required as is a shirt. You would think that this would be obvious but a boarder left last year because the BO would not let her ride in just her sports bra.:rolleyes: It is a laid back barn, but not THAT laid back!!

alteringwego
Dec. 2, 2009, 02:16 PM
no crack in the front and no crack in the back

indygirl2560
Dec. 2, 2009, 02:57 PM
My very first barn required hair up in helmet, polo tucked in, with beige/khaki breeches, a belt and polished tall boots and spurs. It was a big fancy A show barn that hosted some nice shows in LA. I thought their policy was a little extreme, but I only rode there for a month and then moved to a different city!

The other two barns I've been at(also A show barns) required a nice fitted shirt(preferably polo), breeches, neat hair(my current barn doesn't require hair in helmet but the one I just left did), and clean boots.

Rules vary with each barn, but if you show up looking neat with clean, appropriate tack and clothes, you'll be fine.

danosaur
Dec. 2, 2009, 03:41 PM
my barn does not, but my trainer does.
I ride in colored tailoreds, tall boots, a fitted tee shirt, fitted sweatshirt, black northface vest, and then maybe a down jacket.
it's cold in new hampshire :lol:
I usually have my hair in a neat pony tail and use a square pad and fuzzy girth. My horse wears heidi boots, sometimes light pink polos if I'm feeling immature.

my trainer is trying to upgrade me to hunter hair at all times, polos and such, belt, gloves, show ring ready polished boots. etc.
I'm working on that. baby steps.

Aliascml
Dec. 2, 2009, 04:37 PM
My barn doesn not have an official dress code. However, most riders wear breeches, tucked in shirt, belt, tall boots or half chaps and hunter hair. Honestly, I just don't feel comfortable with my hair in a pony tail or my shirt untucked.

Tiffany01
Dec. 2, 2009, 04:47 PM
No dress code here snice my baqrn is a trail riding barn.

kellyb
Dec. 2, 2009, 04:47 PM
No dress code here. I don't care either way, if there was one I would already be meeting it (always tall boots, breeches, hair net, fitted shirt, gloves) if there's not one, well I don't give a crap what YOU wear to go see your horse. I personally always dress like that so it is not a rude awakening when I go to a show.

I don't do the tucked in shirt & belt thing though, sorry. I only have high rise breeches (to contain my midsection) and tucking in my shirt and putting a belt on would make me look like Steve Urkel :lol:

Thomas_1
Dec. 2, 2009, 05:03 PM
Only rule we have is riding hats whenever you're around horses and sensible appropriate clothing.

I don't give a flying fig if someone chooses to ride with their shirt out and looking like a scruffy git or not!

theroanypony
Dec. 2, 2009, 05:12 PM
My barn's only dress code is that you wear proper footwear, a helmet, and decently fitting clothes. Absolutely no sports bras or shorts. And an unspoken rule is no full chaps, not sure why. You will get yelled at if you leave your hair down in a lesson and it's flying in your face. Other than that, it's really laid back. Some people wear jeans/half chaps, others (like me) wear polos, tucked in, breeches and tidy hair. The main goal is just safety, I like taking it up another level and look very neat and tidy. I dress up in regular life too though, so I guess I just like looking my best.

virtus02
Dec. 2, 2009, 05:18 PM
I have never ridden at a show barn with a strict/written dress code. However, if you wear something inappropriate to a show barn, expect to be asked not to wear it again. For example: bra straps showing, sleeveless shirts, baggy clothes, midriff showing, torn pants, ill fitting clothes, etc. When I ride I typically wear breeches and tall boots and a polo with a well fitted jacket or sweater. Just think how you look to others. If your booty is popping out of your pants would you like to be the person riding behind you or the trainer coaching you? Also if your bra straps are slipping down, your adjusting your pants or helmets it takes away from your riding.

findeight
Dec. 2, 2009, 06:02 PM
Your bigger show barns with AA level horses and training are going to expect a little more thought in the attire you show up in then a general boarding, non show or mixed discipline barns do.

But most of the time, it's not nazilike. If you are paying $75 for a lesson with a respected trainer, it's not a stretch to expect you to tuck in your shirt and wear breeches and boots or NICE jeans and half chaps. And do something with the hair.

Most of the time, it is just no visable underwear, no tanks or spaghetti strap tops, no questionable, semi witty sayings on tees, no holes in the jeans and neat hair.

It's their property and their business and part of what you look for when selecting a barn.

And, for the OP, yes, most serious show barns will expect you to be neat and present yourself well when on the property.

SkipChange
Dec. 2, 2009, 06:06 PM
Also if your bra straps are slipping down, your adjusting your pants or helmets it takes away from your riding.

It definitely takes away from your riding. I had one bra where the straps always slipped down while I was riding, and I can say that it's quite difficult to navigate a 3'6" course while trying to fix straps. Racerback sports bras from now on!

klmck63
Dec. 2, 2009, 06:25 PM
It definitely takes away from your riding. I had one bra where the straps always slipped down while I was riding, and I can say that it's quite difficult to navigate a 3'6" course while trying to fix straps. Racerback sports bras from now on!

A friend's coach made them get off and tie their straps together at the back with bailing twine :lol:. Not too bad of a solution in a pinch, really.

Ozone
Dec. 3, 2009, 11:57 AM
Humm, dress code - we generally do not have a dress code but it seems like, somehow the barn made it's own.

Goes like this:

The horses are sparkly clean before and after lessons

All the little kids wear helmet (without their hair tucked properly :) ) breeches, paddock boots, clean shirt and vest or fitted jacket in cold weather & gloves. God aweful LOUD saddle pads :)

The teens wear breeches and half chaps for the most part with fitted shirts/jackets and no gloves ;) Hair neat - Helmet of course. Pale colored saddle pads with white sheepskin half pads.

The Adults wear jeans/belt/half chap/hoodies/tanks - yes I said TANK TOPS yeah! No boobie ones though and def. no bum out low rise jeans :) Some gloves, some not. Seems like the more "decked out" adults always seem to have some funky saddle pad on. The ones that are presentably done up away have white or black fitted or square pads. Some Adults look like a hot mess with their hair - most of us are tucked in and under.

We do not use polo wraps on any horse of any color.

We go black/white/gum bell boots, and black/brown/navy jumping boots.

But... we do not have a dress code besides a helmet! Still, this is what we just show up in :)

dani0303
Dec. 3, 2009, 12:41 PM
I don't require a strict dress code but I do have some basic requirements. For my beginners/young students all I require is basic safety minded clothing (breeches or jeans, boots with heel and helmet). For my students who are showing I require that they wear breeches or jeans, tall boots or half chaps, with a close fitting top/jacket and helmet. I don't particularly care if it is a polo, collared shirt, etc but it must be close fitting. Besides a safety issue, it is incredibly difficult to critique a riders eq if they are wearing a baggy /blowing shirt or jacket. Most of my riders put their hair up under their helmets which I like (again it gives a nicer silhouette which is easier to critique). Horses must be clean but I don't need a show turn out for lessons.

Now if I were a strictly A-rated show barn then I might step it up but we are a mixed group (A-rated riders, local show riders, and beginners) so I think my rules reflect that. If I had a student that wore offensive clothing (too much skin, etc) I would quietly ask them to wear something more conservative since we have little kids in the barn too.

Your place sounds exactly like mine! Those are my requirements to a tee

Schune
Dec. 3, 2009, 01:27 PM
My barn doesn't have a real dress code - all that is in the boarding/waiver contract is mandatory headgear, boots with heels, etc.

For me, though, it's just a matter of personal pride. I like looking neat and tidy, with my half chaps, breeches, clean belt, polo, long sleeve sweater, vest, etc. all coordinating colors, too.

:)

jumpingmaya
Dec. 3, 2009, 03:36 PM
I might sound like GM saying this... but to me, how you dress reflects how seriously you take the sport :yes:

Don't get me wrong, I don't think riding is a beauty contest. I definitley ride without makeup and my hair isn't straightened or anything... but I look neat, clean and like I'm there to get something accomplished. And I even do this riding at my own place, by myself... :winkgrin:

So for me it's breeches (always but I grew up riding in Europe, didn't even know that riding in jeans was an option when I came here), clean boots and half chaps, close fitting shirt/polo (even though a lot of my polos are sleeve-less.. but I live in Florida) and hairnet with helmet... and gloves (always, I have the tan line to prove it)!

paintlady
Dec. 3, 2009, 03:52 PM
No, other than a helmet and appropriate footwear. I pay to board there, no one needs to tell me what I have to wear to go play with my mud ball horse. I mean he is a HORSE...he rolls in his own crap, I don't think I need to be required to be in tan breeches, a polo and expensive tall boots everyday to ride him. Often times I do just roll out of bed and go see him, but I do wear breeches, a tshirt, half chaps and boots.

If someone was a problem and showing too much skin, I'm sure something would be said, but we don't have that problem at our barn. I would never board somewhere that had a dress code, but I also like to groom my own horse which a lot of big barns have hired help to do.

I agree! The only thing that is *REQUIRED* at my barn is a helmet and appropriate footwear. Of course, I board at a small private adult barn - not a big show barn.

I'd hate it if I was told I had to wear my shirt tucked in. I'm not fat, but I still find breeches unflattering. I usually wear a baggy shirt to cover them us.

ClassAction
Dec. 3, 2009, 03:52 PM
When I did IHSA, I heard rumors that there were coaches that made their riders go without underwear to prevent pantylines. Does this have any basis in reality?

luvs2ridewbs
Dec. 3, 2009, 03:58 PM
I do love a good sleeveless polo. I'm surprised that a show barn would look down on that.

lizajane09
Dec. 3, 2009, 03:59 PM
When I did IHSA, I heard rumors that there were coaches that made their riders go without underwear to prevent pantylines. Does this have any basis in reality?

Don't think it was required, but the captain of the IHSA team where I went to undergrad made it well known that she rode without underwear for that reason... don't know why she wanted to share. No idea what the rest of the team did, but pantylines were definitely to be avoided at all costs in their/the coach's opinion.

paintlady
Dec. 3, 2009, 04:00 PM
When the temps are nearing 100 and it's humid, I have been known to show up at the barn in shorts. I throw on a bareback pad and off we go.

Equus_girl
Dec. 3, 2009, 04:22 PM
I do love a good sleeveless polo. I'm surprised that a show barn would look down on that.

Our barn has a written policy prohibiting sleeveless shirts. Its not that they are looking down on it, but they care about scratches on your shoulders in case of the fall (or at least that's the official explanation.)

Go Fish
Dec. 3, 2009, 04:31 PM
I do love a good sleeveless polo. I'm surprised that a show barn would look down on that.

Me, too. It's hot in the summer around here. I think the difference is the sleeveless polo has a collar and covers the chest and back. You are only minus the sleeves.

My trainer leads by example...you can clearly get an idea of what is expected of you when you show up for a lesson. He is NOT a boot and breech Nazi...but he doesn't think "sex appeal" belongs in the barn.

danceronice
Dec. 3, 2009, 04:43 PM
When I did IHSA, I heard rumors that there were coaches that made their riders go without underwear to prevent pantylines. Does this have any basis in reality?

Sounds reasonable to me. In dance and skating we generally leave off anything under the tights and bodysuits (it's that or a thong and I can't imagine riding in a thong, either!)


I don't do the tucked in shirt & belt thing though, sorry. I only have high rise breeches (to contain my midsection) and tucking in my shirt and putting a belt on would make me look like Steve Urkel!

Oh, thank God, I was starting to feel like the lone ranger. When I was riding all the time, the only time I tucked in my shirt was if it was FREEZING and I was wearing a coat of some kind over it, and the only time I tucked in my shirt AND wore a belt was if I was in show kit and wearing a hunt coat over it. I was starting to wonder if everyone on here was long-waisted with narrow hips! Tucked in means I look like Urkel, or like I'm wearing Mom jeans, a belt is either riding on my hip bones doing no good whatsoever or jabbing me in the rib cage.

Heeled boots, helmet (with my hair down in a braid--hunter hair always has and always will look dumb, my helmet doesn't fit if I stuff it in there, and I wear hairnets for no man--well, okay, over a bun if I"m wearing one for dance, and then it's two or three nets just over the bun, because it would stupid over the entire hairstyle), and I am seriously considering buying an protective vest. Amazing how being old enough to know how much I don't bounce makes it all about the safety.

And I live in Michigan and rode all year as a kid--in winter, it was gloves, and any coat I had that was short enough to ride in and was thick enough to keep me warm (and I still had days when I was huddled by the barn bathroom space heater, trying to feel my fingers and toes again.)

JinxyFish313
Dec. 3, 2009, 04:49 PM
I don't have a posted code or anything, but I have expectations. If you show up for a lesson in something dirty or ill-fitting, I'll tease you in front of the group the first time and remind you why its important to wear more fitting attire. The second time I'm not as nice, and I have told students to procure alternative cover or skip their lesson. My main concern is that I want to be able to see what their body is doing, and I can't if you're wearing your dad's neon orange down vest.

I prefer you be just as tidy when schooling on your own, but I wouldn't make a fuss about it.

Beginners don't have to put hair up as long as its tidy and out of the way, but my more advanced students all put it up.

I can't stand tank tops on students, but a sleeveless polo is acceptable (though I think they make most people look funny ;) ).

Most of my students are on full service so the horse end of the dress code is my staff's responsibility. They are all fat, shiny, in clean and well oiled tack with white or black pads. The students who use schoolies or care for their own just need to be tidy. They can't always come out early enough to make their horses spotless before a lesson, nothing I can do about that.

Mara
Dec. 3, 2009, 04:54 PM
Unless someone really needs it to hold their breeches in place, I don't see the fuss over a belt. Of course I speak as a person whose body is one giant overactive kidney; a belt is just one more obstacle between me and the toilet in times of dire need.
Half vs. full chaps - it's nice to have the full in the winter sometimes!

toomanyponies
Dec. 3, 2009, 06:15 PM
Along the same lines. . . how does one tell one's student, who has dutifully show up in her breeches, boots, fitted shirt, belt, gloves and hairnet, and given her all in her lesson, that she really, really needs to wear not just one, but 2 sports bras???? I never did really address that one. . .

Bobblehead
Dec. 3, 2009, 06:17 PM
Yes! We are required to wear clothes.

klmck63
Dec. 3, 2009, 06:18 PM
Along the same lines. . . how does one tell one's student, who has dutifully show up in her breeches, boots, fitted shirt, belt, gloves and hairnet, and given her all in her lesson, that she really, really needs to wear not just one, but 2 sports bras???? I never did really address that one. . .

Perhaps gently and privately suggest she might be more comfortable in a sports bra?

Potentially a delicate issue, best to be sensitive and kind!

KristieBee
Dec. 3, 2009, 06:24 PM
Along the same lines. . . how does one tell one's student, who has dutifully show up in her breeches, boots, fitted shirt, belt, gloves and hairnet, and given her all in her lesson, that she really, really needs to wear not just one, but 2 sports bras???? I never did really address that one. . .

I'm a double sports bra person myself - I can't believe anyone would ever get an enhancement, I find them to be such an impediment! Sigh. But I digress...

Just tell her in confidence like you're on her side, not criticizing her. Take on a warm/big sister tone. Personally because I can relate I'd share something about myself, but if you can't, maybe you can invent a sister or a cousin who was about her size, and share that this person found that wearing two sportsbras together was SO much more comfortable.

Target sells very affordable Champion pull on sportsbras and when you wear two together, one size down, (I'm a 34C cup but I have two size smalls) they're pretty magical. Nothing is going ANYWHERE. :)

Oh and btw, whoever was worried about VPL (visible panty lines) but doesn't like wearing thongs, I have a godsend for you:

Hanes Perfect Panty Boyshorts.

Looks like you're not wearing anything -but so much more comfortable.

eclipse
Dec. 3, 2009, 06:48 PM
Yes! We are required to wear clothes.

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: ......YOU would fit right in at our barn. Every Tuesday, we give our trainer a big old headache with "tacky Tuesday".....yep, it looks just as bad as it sounds!! :lol: :lol: :lol:

findeight
Dec. 3, 2009, 08:36 PM
I do love a good sleeveless polo. I'm surprised that a show barn would look down on that.

Who said they did?
If it has a collar, it's acceptable anywhere I have ever been.

And you can probably slide on tucking it in IF it is a good fit and you are not sitting on the hem-which means no belt. Nobody checks that stuff if it soes not show.

But showing up to school or take a lesson at a serious show barn (or anywhere else) in some kid of baggy tee shirt billowing out behind you and bunching under your butt because it's too long or something so skimpy it makes onlookers wince at every trot step because that has to hurt? Common sense.

Oh, the better brands of breeches are much less prone to panty lines-especially if they are the correct size. Wearing panty hose under in the winter or any cooler weather eliminates them, so does buying "granny pants" with a real thin or no hem on each leg. Not a mystery.

hj0519
Dec. 3, 2009, 08:43 PM
I do love a good sleeveless polo. I'm surprised that a show barn would look down on that.


Who said they did?
If it has a collar, it's acceptable anywhere I have ever been.


A lot of barns I know forbid any shirts that don't have sleeves.

KristieBee
Dec. 3, 2009, 08:56 PM
A lot of barns I know forbid any shirts that don't have sleeves.

My last barn did...even if it was a nice RL sleeveless polo. Not that brands matter, but if you're familiar with the style you know it's not even the least bit snug.

They were quite rigid regarding what went on the horses too: only white baby pads under sheepskin half pads, and only black or white polo wraps.

I'm happier where I am now. I don't do anything too crazy but I am a fan of my pretty plaid saddle pads in conservative colors. And the occasional sleevless shirt ;).

saultgirl
Dec. 3, 2009, 10:22 PM
No dress codes around here. Many riders muck their own stalls for reduced board, so clothing needs to be multi-purpose. I wouldn't want to be mucking stalls and throwing down hay in nice clothes, not to mention grooming a muddy or shedding horse.

Flypony
Dec. 4, 2009, 01:43 AM
Does not sound like many of you enjoy your horses. Just the fashion show your putting on. They are horses for crying out loud, they don't care if you tuck your shirt in or not. And you wonder why this sport is in the society pages instead of the sport pages

Polydor
Dec. 4, 2009, 02:11 AM
At college we did have a dress code which i liked. It was the 5 Bs:
-No boobs
-No Bra Straps
-No belly
-No Back
-No butt

So basically doesn't have to be fancy but neat and tidy. Also has to be paddock boots or good solid work boots. This went for in class or around the farm since we were dealing with industry owned horses and owners could arrive at any time.

P.

spotted mustang
Dec. 4, 2009, 02:25 AM
At college we did have a dress code which i liked. It was the 5 Bs:
-No boobs
-No Bra Straps
-No belly
-No Back
-No butt


this puzzles me. Could you elaborate? How does one ride without a butt? What do you sit on then?? And no torso (back, belly, boobs) either? Only head and legs allowed? Mr. Potatohead?

BigEq
Dec. 4, 2009, 08:39 AM
this puzzles me. Could you elaborate? How does one ride without a butt? What do you sit on then?? And no torso (back, belly, boobs) either? Only head and legs allowed? Mr. Potatohead?

I think she just means you shouldn't be exposing those areas :lol:

My old barn made us wear breeches/polo tucked in/tall boots/belt everyday, so when I moved to another "A" show barn I kept doing that. It's just kind of an unspoken rule at this new barn, at least to the show kids.

meupatdoes
Dec. 4, 2009, 08:39 AM
I have my own dress code regardless of whether the barn I am at does or not.

I buy polo shirts at Target. They cost the same as other $10 shirts I could choose, and it is not any more difficult to pay $10 for a neat, trim polo than to pay $10 for big baggy T-shirt.
They go in the wash the same as any other shirt too.

I also get the wrinkle resistant shirts from Eddie Bauer. These are slightly more expensive, but they get worn to work first, and then the next day they are recycled as a barn shirt. Then they go in the wash and the dryer the same as any other shirt and are ready to go.

Similarly it is not any more expensive to buy black polos than it is to buy flame colored ones; plain saddle pads do not cost more than plaid ones.

It is much more a discipline and professionalism thing than a money thing.



Then again, one day I was in the barn by myself at 6am to get a ride in before work and was surprised by a film crew that the BO had allowed to come in to shoot a promotional video (http://www.video-postcard.com/vCard.aspx?postcardId=58722) for the barn builder.
My horses and I just so happend to be presentable as usual (full chaps and collared shirt on the chestnut) and thus we were invited to ride around in the video. They had shot other riders at a different barn the builder had built, but, and I quote, "They didn't really look professional so it is great to find someone who looks like a serious rider." All the way back to the person who BUILT the barn they preferred to be represented by someone who could tuck in a shirt.

Looking professional is not just about you. It is also about the person who owns/runs the facility you ride at, about representing your/their program, and about making your horses look their best. You never know when someone might randomly stop by, and leaving the impression that things are done to a high standard even when no-one is supposed to be looking is a much better impression to leave than the other way around.

And it does not cost any more than wearing sloppy clothes, and they go in the laundry just the same.

findeight
Dec. 4, 2009, 12:39 PM
Does not sound like many of you enjoy your horses. Just the fashion show your putting on. They are horses for crying out loud, they don't care if you tuck your shirt in or not. And you wonder why this sport is in the society pages instead of the sport pages

Some trainers do not want to spend lesson time trying to figure out where a rider's body actually is posture wise because of overlarge, baggy shirts, cascading/tangled hair covering the shoulders (and face)or wince when parts peek out that should stay covered.

That has nothing to do with fashion pages or horse enjoyment. I care not to look trashy or like a dirty slob even if the horse does not give a rats hinny.

Ajierene
Dec. 4, 2009, 01:16 PM
Some trainers do not want to spend lesson time trying to figure out where a rider's body actually is posture wise because of overlarge, baggy shirts, cascading/tangled hair covering the shoulders (and face)or wince when parts peek out that should stay covered.

That has nothing to do with fashion pages or horse enjoyment. I care not to look trashy or like a dirty slob even if the horse does not give a rats hinny.

You can see the same things in jeans and a t-shirt that is the correct size.

What I noticed growing up was that the kids that showed up in jeans and a t-shirt were more devoted to the horse than the kids that showed up in breeches and polo shirt.

Maybe it was because the kids in jeans did not have a lot of money and were more appreciative of the opportunity to ride, have a horse, etc., while the kids in breeches and a polo shirt got everything they asked for and only ever had a mild interest in horses, but got one because their parents had money and there was a status symbol factor in play as well.

klmck63
Dec. 4, 2009, 01:20 PM
What I noticed growing up was that the kids that showed up in jeans and a t-shirt were more devoted to the horse than the kids that showed up in breeches and polo shirt.
:eek::lol:

So the fact that I've worn breeches and not jeans my whole life makes me undedicated? :lol:

I guess I'd better get with the program :lol:.

Really now.

Lori B
Dec. 4, 2009, 01:23 PM
Dang it, bobblehead, you beat me to it.

I haven't worn a belt since I dressed up as a pirate about 4 years ago, and don't expect to again unless I get cancer, go on chemo, and lose 40 lbs. If God had intended me to wear a belt, he wouldn't have jammed my ribcage down onto my hips.

Horse is clean and well-fed, arena is dragged nearly daily, and the money I spend on her care and board keeps me from doing anything beyond replacing my kerrits tights when they disintegrate every few years. ;-)

Glad y'all like your dress code, thank god we don't have one.

Tex Mex
Dec. 4, 2009, 01:33 PM
You will not ride the same in jeans or chaps as you do in boots and breeches. So when you get to a horse show and your leg feels looser, or your stirrups need to be adjusted, etc. it is obvious that you have not prepared for the show properly. If you ride at an A show barn, you should dress appropriately to maximize your training sessions.

Trixie
Dec. 4, 2009, 01:39 PM
Does not sound like many of you enjoy your horses. Just the fashion show your putting on. They are horses for crying out loud, they don't care if you tuck your shirt in or not. And you wonder why this sport is in the society pages instead of the sport pages

Most of the reasons given for dress codes have nothing to do with the “society pages” and have everything to do with being professional and respectful to those who are training you. I enjoy my horse plenty – but I want to present an image of being a serious, respectful rider who cares about her turnout and her horse when I step into a trainer’s barn. It’s also the same reason I do not show up to a business meeting in cutoffs and crocs.



What I noticed growing up was that the kids that showed up in jeans and a t-shirt were more devoted to the horse than the kids that showed up in breeches and polo shirt.

Maybe it was because the kids in jeans did not have a lot of money and were more appreciative of the opportunity to ride, have a horse, etc., while the kids in breeches and a polo shirt got everything they asked for and only ever had a mild interest in horses, but got one because their parents had money and there was a status symbol factor in play as well.

Really? How utterly judgy-pants of you. :rolleyes:

I ride in breeches every ride because jeans give me nasty rubs. Am I unappreciative because of my pants or do I need to come up with some better “poor-me” cred so you don’t think I’m not “devoted?” :lol:

No barn I’ve ever ridden with has advocated anything but tidy, clean, and inoffensive. I’ve not had anyone suggest brands but certain elements of attire are commented on, mainly for common sense reasons: i.e., the billowing tee makes it hard to see the rider’s body.

Lori B
Dec. 4, 2009, 01:42 PM
Tex Mex, that is absolutely true re: boots & breeches. The last 5 or so rides before a show I always wear my tall boots, even though I can't help preferring the fit and comfort of my half chaps. And I've never ridden in anything but tights or breeches, not jeans.

I just don't think my horse (or my position) depends on whether I'm wearing a t-shirt or something with a collar. And wearing sorta nice clothes to scrape mud off of a horse is just nutty, and taking a change of clothes to the barn is too.

danceronice
Dec. 4, 2009, 01:54 PM
I prefer longsleeve tees (the "tee" designation has to do with the collar, not sleeve length) or turtlenecks/mock turtlenecks. How does the collar of my shirt make any difference? I don't like polos--the sleeves and collar are always uncomfortable, and "fitted" is never a word I'd use to describe any I own.

Personally I don't get the tall boots R special thing...unless I was going out just to do ground stuff I wore my tall boots. I don't like chaps, jeans ride up my leg, and if I wore paddock boots with breeches it felt too slippery. I've worn my dress boots just for fashion sometimes, and yes, they're custom-uppers I paid a lot for at the time I bought them.

Breeches, it would be nice if someone came up with something more comfortable and with sizing charts comprehensible to the average human, but then I usually wear black schooling tights anyway.

Hm. Now I'm thinking my old rust breeches (if I still have them somewhere) would look really nice with my (untucked, of course) thick ribbed turtleneck sweaters for fall/spring riding. Cream over rust could look nice...

Go Fish
Dec. 4, 2009, 01:58 PM
You will not ride the same in jeans or chaps as you do in boots and breeches.

Yes I do...

Ibex
Dec. 4, 2009, 02:02 PM
No spaghetti strapped tanks while riding, but beyond that no rules. We only have a handful of kids, so it's really not an issue beyond the now-banned trashy tops. And that was only because the neighbour's employees were WAY too enthused about a couple of the kids and were hanging over the fence making really inappropriate comments :dead:

Nothing else beyond that. Although I have some saddle pads that I think trainer would happily ban... :D

Arizona DQ
Dec. 4, 2009, 02:05 PM
You can see the same things in jeans and a t-shirt that is the correct size.

What I noticed growing up was that the kids that showed up in jeans and a t-shirt were more devoted to the horse than the kids that showed up in breeches and polo shirt.

Maybe it was because the kids in jeans did not have a lot of money and were more appreciative of the opportunity to ride, have a horse, etc., while the kids in breeches and a polo shirt got everything they asked for and only ever had a mild interest in horses, but got one because their parents had money and there was a status symbol factor in play as well.

:lol:When I was a teenager, I worked part time to be able to take lessons. I wore jeans and hand-me-down cowboy boots in my jumping lessons. I guess everyone knew I was the "poor kid" as opposed to the rich kids who got everything they asked for... The instructor treated me the same as anyone else Thank goodness!!! Now in my late 50's, I am still riding and I am sure most of those "kids" are busy with their "garden clubs" or whatever.....:no:

rugbygirl
Dec. 4, 2009, 02:16 PM
Does not sound like many of you enjoy your horses. Just the fashion show your putting on. They are horses for crying out loud, they don't care if you tuck your shirt in or not. And you wonder why this sport is in the society pages instead of the sport pages

Almost all sports have dress codes. Most more stringent than riding.

You belong to a team, you wear team colours. How many teams take the field in mismatching uniforms?

You play a sport that requires certain equipment, you bring it. If your coach suggests everyone buy a certain brand, you do it. You don't show up with a baseball bat to play Lacrosse.

Professional tennis players pay fines for dressing improperly. You're not allowed ON most golf courses unless you meet the code. Hells, BOWLING requires pretty specific footwear.

I've played rugby for coaches who insisted we tuck in our shirts, some didn't care as much. I've played games where referees booted people for having incorrect cleats on, or whose shirts were too big and sloppy. I've played on teams where you could slouch your rugby socks, and others where everyone's had to be pulled up. It's not fashion, it's about how looking like a team makes you act like a team.

Even just going on down to the gym, most people have a "uniform". Clothes they pull on that help to put them in the "gym" mindset. Special shoes for running or weightlifting. Maybe gloves. No one goes to the gym in the clothes they wore to work...unless they work at a gym ;)

I get the acidity toward fashion, but it sure isn't unique to equestrian sports. Even barns that specify colours are STILL less stringent than most sports teams. We even had game-day rules...show up at class in a nice top and skirt or you didn't play that night!

rugbygirl
Dec. 4, 2009, 02:18 PM
thick ribbed turtleneck sweaters for fall/spring riding. Cream over rust could look nice...

That DOES sound nice...

I haven't seen rust breeches for sale here. I would wear them!


MM, also one point. I train with a coach who keeps a mind on making riding more affordable. HENCE the lesson dress codes. IF the only pair of breeches you can afford to buy that year is purple, you can't show in them. If, however, you own more normal breeches, a nice top and belt and one set of boots or boots/half chaps, you can wear your schooling clothes to show, no problem. Same with tack. If you can afford multiple sets of boots, go nuts on colours for lessons...but if your mom complains about cost, make sure the one pair you buy is also suitable for shows.

klmck63
Dec. 4, 2009, 02:20 PM
:lol:When I was a teenager, I worked part time to be able to take lessons. I wore jeans and hand-me-down cowboy boots in my jumping lessons. I guess everyone knew I was the "poor kid" as opposed to the rich kids who got everything they asked for... The instructor treated me the same as anyone else Thank goodness!!! Now in my late 50's, I am still riding and I am sure most of those "kids" are busy with their "garden clubs" or whatever.....:no:

I'm sorry, but are you people being serious? :eek: Clothes have absolutely no bearing on dedication. My parents are by no means rich, I wore second hand breeches when I was little, some kids rode in jeans, some kids rode in brand new breeches. Some of us had paddock boots, some rode in the rubber 'field boots', some had real field boots and some rode in regular plain old rubber boots.

Some kids were lucky and had rich parents who gave them everything, some had rich parents who want to make sure their kid was going to stick with it before buying the equipment and some people had parents who could barely afford the lessons as it was.

At that age we were all equally obsessed with horses, I would say. At this point in time, three of us still ride and compete, one was the girl who had everything, one is myself (I consider myself to be middle of the road, average), and one was the girl who pretty much had nothing. The ones who don't ride anymore are a similar mix of social status/clothes.

It's just silly to base dedication on clothing or social status.


As for dress code at our barn, there isn't really an official one. Everyone rides in breeches and boots or half chaps, all saddle pads and boots happen to be pretty neutral. Some of the little kids have pink boots on their ponies. I always ride in breeches with half chaps and paddock boots. If I had a spare pair of field boots, I'd use them but I save mine just for shows. I ride in a fitted top, polo or otherwise in the summer, add a sweater for the fall and spring, add a coat or a vest and a thick sweater for winter. Same with everyone else. Some people do hunter hair, some don't. The older women who don't show sometimes ride in baggier shirts, all the kids who ride competitively pretty much wind up dressing the same through osmosis.

Nobody really cares, so long as what you're wearing is safe and appropriate. I wouldn't mind being at a barn with a dress code.

2bayboys
Dec. 4, 2009, 02:45 PM
That DOES sound nice...


MM, also one point. I train with a coach who keeps a mind on making riding more affordable. HENCE the lesson dress codes. IF the only pair of breeches you can afford to buy that year is purple, you can't show in them. If, however, you own more normal breeches, a nice top and belt and one set of boots or boots/half chaps, you can wear your schooling clothes to show, no problem. Same with tack. If you can afford multiple sets of boots, go nuts on colours for lessons...but if your mom complains about cost, make sure the one pair you buy is also suitable for shows.

There's another way to look at this side of the issue. If you can only afford to buy one pair of breeches, then you sure don't want to be wearing them every time you ride! Otherwise, they will look like a complete mess by the time they do make it to a horse show. On the other hand, most everybody owns several pairs of jeans, which are much hardier than britches, and can be worn to the barn and to school or on other casual occasions.

I wear jeans, paddock boots, half chaps, and whatever I need up top to keep me either warm and dry or cool and comfortable.

S A McKee
Dec. 4, 2009, 02:54 PM
You belong to a team, you wear team colours. How many teams take the field in mismatching uniforms?

You play a sport that requires certain equipment, you bring it. If your coach suggests everyone buy a certain brand, you do it. You don't show up with a baseball bat to play Lacrosse.

Professional tennis players pay fines for dressing improperly. You're not allowed ON most golf courses unless you meet the code. Hells, BOWLING requires pretty specific footwear.

I've played rugby for coaches who insisted we tuck in our shirts, some didn't care as much. I've played games where referees booted people for having incorrect cleats on, or whose shirts were too big and sloppy. I've played on teams where you could slouch your rugby socks, and others where everyone's had to be pulled up. It's not fashion, it's about how looking like a team makes you act like a team.

Even just going on down to the gym, most people have a "uniform". Clothes they pull on that help to put them in the "gym" mindset. Special shoes for running or weightlifting. Maybe gloves. No one goes to the gym in the clothes they wore to work...unless they work at a gym ;)

I get the acidity toward fashion, but it sure isn't unique to equestrian sports. Even barns that specify colours are STILL less stringent than most sports teams. We even had game-day rules...show up at class in a nice top and skirt or you didn't play that night!

It's not a team sport.

Yes, in H/J you use an english saddle not western. But I'd be wondering why the trainer insists on a certain brand. Maybe the brand that he gets a kick back for at the local tack store? I mean really, no one saddle will fit every horse.

Tennis attire fines are to prevent offensive/too revealing clothing.
Bowling requires a certain type of shoe because of the wood surface. In some sports incorrect footwear can be dangerous ( like riding) but the color of your shoes doesn't fit in the dangerous category. Not the same as riding in sneakers vs boot or paddock boots.

Once more, riding is not a team sport.

At the gym you are apt to see a rainbow of colors. Very individual.

And speaking as a practical matter there is no sense whatsoever to using white saddle pads.

Some people like to be controlled by their trainers, some are individuals and can think for themselves.

Safety, certainly. Your trainer's fashion sense, no.

Ajierene
Dec. 4, 2009, 03:10 PM
Really? How utterly judgy-pants of you. :rolleyes:

Here I thought personal experiences had nothing to do with judging someone, but were personal experiences.

I mention my childhood experience to point out how it contradicted the assertion by some posters that wearing breeches and polo shirts showed you were more dedicated. It simply is not the case. The clothing that you wear has nothing to do with your dedication level. Some people wear jeans most of the time because they cannot afford a lot of breeches and want to save them for shows. Some people can afford the breeches and nicer paddock shoes and wear them.

I agree with S A McKee - it is all dependent. Personally, I would never conform to a dress code just because it is there. If someone can show me where a polo shirt is more safe or somehow helps you use your upper body better than a t-shirt that fits the same way, then I will wear polo shirts. Until then, my wardrobe will remain being old t-shirts.

luvs2ridewbs
Dec. 4, 2009, 03:10 PM
except anything white can be bleached and disinfected.

Go Fish
Dec. 4, 2009, 03:12 PM
And speaking as a practical matter there is no sense whatsoever to using white saddle pads.

Yes there is. I ride in white pads because they can be bleached. Much easier to keep clean and disinfect. It's also easier to see when they are dirty and keep an eye on saddle fit by looking at dirt patterns on the underside of the pad.

Ajierene
Dec. 4, 2009, 03:18 PM
Almost all sports have dress codes. Most more stringent than riding.

All sports have some kind of dress code for the competition. If, however, you go to the practice sessions for those teams, you will find a variety of colors and wear.

For sports such as field hockey and tennis that require women to wear skirts during competition, you will find the team players often wearing shorts and baggy t-shirts during competition.

They need the basics - proper footwear, any applicable pads (shin guards, shoulder pads, etc), any appropriate headgear (helmet, mouth guard), and ancillary (racket, stick, etc). Everything else is just fashion - shirt, shorts, pants, etc.

For riding, all that is required are boots with a heel. Some places require an approved helmet. If you can ride in jeans, have at it. If you prefer breeches, good for you.

When the field hockey player is practicing, she is often wearing shorts, t-shirt, maybe sweats if it is chilly. When she is playing in a competition, she is wearing the uniform of the school. This includes a skirt (often worn with spandex shorts underneath) and a polo shirt.

Hence, when a horseback rider is practicing, she may wear jeans and half chaps, just jeans, breeches, t-shirt, sweater or whatever she wants.

When she is at a competition (show), she wears the uniform of the show - polo shirt or shirt and jacket, properly colored breeches, tall boots.

I can see some sale barns or stallion stations like Hilltop, requiring their paid employees or working students to wear a uniform. However, any place that I pay someone to take care of my horses, I will wear whatever I please (with modesty in mind - not going to show up in just a sports bra...)

Bogie
Dec. 4, 2009, 03:42 PM
IMHO the only dress code that should be required is a boot with heels and an approved helmet. Yes, I can see talking to the semi-naked teens who turn up, but that's a different issue.

I see too many people who look gorgeously "turned out" with shiny horses, immaculate saddle pads, expensive tack . . . and no helmet.

Personally, I do not want to be in a barn where I have to wear certain "outfits." I'm paying to board my horse and for that horse to be well cared for, not to wear a uniform.

Wearing the "right" clothes does not necessarily make you a rider that is better, more serious, or more informed. After all, look at the multitudes of people who still insist on using polos because they give "support." ;)

I've been at many barns over many decades and have seen a lot of fashion trends come and go.

findeight
Dec. 4, 2009, 03:44 PM
I don't ride the same in jeans as in breeches-I find I slip a little more in the breeches and it takes a little adjusting to.

I find the half chap gives me a little more grip then the tall boots, and that takes some getting used to.

I take 1/2 to 1 hole shorter in stirrup length from paddocks to tall boots as the sole on the paddocks is thicker. That feels weird for awhile.

I ruined the seat on a pricey French saddle wearing jeans and could have bought alot of breeches for what that new seat cost me.:no:

Now, I do still show and used to do the very competitive Adults on the USEF AA level. Last thing I needed was to be uncomfortable, fishing for an iron or sliding around.

I will NOT wear the Vogels everyday but will for a week ahead of the show. I found nice schooling breeches for under 100-including discountinued TS's for $45. Polos are $10 at target, as mentioned. An assortment of nice, long sleeved tops and light sweaters are under $20 most places.

Oh...and why the collar? Just because it makes it easier to discourage the too low cut or revealing cuts without having to list 15 different necklines that just show too much. Neat, well fitting tees will not get any kind of objection most places.

Trixie
Dec. 4, 2009, 03:49 PM
Here I thought personal experiences had nothing to do with judging someone, but were personal experiences.

I mention my childhood experience to point out how it contradicted the assertion by some posters that wearing breeches and polo shirts showed you were more dedicated. It simply is not the case.


Sorry, those didn’t read like personal experiences – they read like assumptions about the dedication, grace, and financial status of the other children and that of their families.


Now in my late 50's, I am still riding and I am sure most of those "kids" are busy with their "garden clubs" or whatever.....

Well, what if they are? It’s not about the haves and have nots – it’s about how you feel about the sport. Maybe some of those kids are still riding; perhaps not… that’s their business. I would imagine that their choice to wear breeches has nothing to do with the fact that, at age 50-something, their priorities may have changed.



I can see some sale barns or stallion stations like Hilltop, requiring their paid employees or working students to wear a uniform. However, any place that I pay someone to take care of my horses, I will wear whatever I please (with modesty in mind - not going to show up in just a sports bra...)

More than likely, you’ll follow the dress code of the barn or go elsewhere, to somewhere that doesn’t care how you represent their barn at home. While it’s unlikely that you’d be thrown out of a barn for failing to follow the dress code, I would think it would at the very least make you appear to be a disagreeable client.

I think there’s definitely a difference between wearing a tidy, fitted tee and wearing a long, baggy one with the shirttails hanging out, also. My parents always taught me that if I wanted to be taken seriously, being well-presented is a good first step. My farm is quite private (just us) so no one cares, but if I haul to trainers, I present myself as if I’m there to do business.

findeight
Dec. 4, 2009, 04:10 PM
bad assumptions in there, I am over 50 (well over) never had any money (or even a horse) as a kid. Don't have much now...and have never been to a garden club in my life and hope never to go to one.

I have nothing to prove to anybody.

But I like to look neat, clean and professional when I ride and find the breeches more comfortable and cheap enough if I look. And I hate baggy tops so wear more fitted....even if I usually don't tuck them in and am guilty of no belt.

I would feel like a slob in old jeans and a baggy tank top or tee. Don't have the upper arms anymore for sleevless. And I get my own horse ready and cooled out including bathing with no damage to the clothing.

The whole issue of assuming what somebody's horsemanship level is based on the fact they dress well is...well...stupid.

rugbygirl
Dec. 4, 2009, 04:30 PM
All sports have some kind of dress code for the competition. If, however, you go to the practice sessions for those teams, you will find a variety of colors and wear.

Not all. We had practice kit on most teams I've been on. I'm not that unique, I can't imagine I was the only one. No, recreational league mini-soccer, you could wear what you liked, but even public High School teams had practice kit.


Yes, in H/J you use an english saddle not western. But I'd be wondering why the trainer insists on a certain brand. Maybe the brand that he gets a kick back for at the local tack store? I mean really, no one saddle will fit every horse.

Many trainers are pretty upfront when suggesting certain brands. I have yet to meet one that forced an ill-fitting saddle onto a horse to get a kick-back though. If the trainer's "team" gets a discount SO BE IT. Who cares? The same is true of many professional athletes, and even high level amateurs. Sports are expensive. You take savings where you can get them, if it works for you.


Tennis attire fines are to prevent offensive/too revealing clothing.

Like most of the dress codes discussed here.



Bowling requires a certain type of shoe because of the wood surface. In some sports incorrect footwear can be dangerous ( like riding) but the color of your shoes doesn't fit in the dangerous category. Not the same as riding in sneakers vs boot or paddock boots.

Colour of your shoes IS dictated by the competition rules though, isn't it. Much like you don't practice rugby is runners, (you wear cleats) why would you wear footwear that is against the competition rules? I don't actually think it is that far out for a coach to require black or brown boots. It would actually be difficult to get a different colour...


Once more, riding is not a team sport.

Maybe not for you. A lot of local Hunter/Jumper barns move about JUST LIKE teams. Wrestling isn't a team sport either, just you and an opponent...but you generally (not always) belong to a TEAM. You travel and train together. You share a coach. You split resources (like the hand-me down race suits my brother's ski team shared). Be as literal as you want, you can't deny that for many competitors and many coaches, there is a strong team element. Again, maybe not FOR YOU. But I imagine you don't have a dress code either. Be as individual as you like. I LIKE belonging to an equestrian team.


At the gym you are apt to see a rainbow of colors. Very individual.

Sure. The point was that part of preparing to engage in an activity involves dressing for it. You dress in what you consider "appropriate" for the activity. Some barns take further steps in defining "appropriate". I wish my gym would. :no:


And speaking as a practical matter there is no sense whatsoever to using white saddle pads.

Some people like to be controlled by their trainers, some are individuals and can think for themselves.

That's pretty unnecessarily insulting to people who adhere to a trainer's program. You can backpedal if you like, but just because a group of competitors choose to adhere to a strict set of rules doesn't mean they lack individuality OR autonomy. Many, many, many papers have been written about how uniforms/uniformity affect results, specifically in sports.

hntrjmprpro45
Dec. 4, 2009, 04:40 PM
Think of wearing polos as a "tradition". We wear hunt coats, conservative colored breeches, dark helmets, etc at horse shows because it is a tradition. Likewise, it is deemed "traditional" to wear polos or collared shirts for schooling. Its respectful to the trainers and the sport like hunt coats are respectful to judges at shows. Are they imperative to riding well? No, but its nice to look nice for your lesson. Hunter/jumper riding is built on traditions, you don't have to necessarily uphold them but don't bash on those who do!

For those who think wearing polo shirts are too expensive, you can go to many sports stores and buy cheap polos for $10-$15 (close to the same price as a tee-shirt). Like I said, I don't require polos but I do think they look very nice and traditional.

rugbygirl
Dec. 4, 2009, 04:43 PM
What's funny to me is that steeped in tradition though Hunters be, our group (admittedly, not a super-strict one) has NOTHING on the local competitive Dressage barns.

-Only white polos, unless the horse is white, then you use black
-Only black tack
-Only breeches and tall boots, breeches must be pale tan or white
-Only collared shirts and vests if it is cold.
-baseball cap, MUST have a baseball cap :lol:

hntrjmprpro45
Dec. 4, 2009, 04:49 PM
What's funny to me is that steeped in tradition though Hunters be, our group (admittedly, not a super-strict one) has NOTHING on the local competitive Dressage barns.

-Only white polos, unless the horse is white, then you use black
-Only black tack
-Only breeches and tall boots, breeches must be pale tan or white
-Only collared shirts and vests if it is cold.
-baseball cap, MUST have a baseball cap :lol:

I have always wondered why dressage riders insist on wearing a baseball cap. I mean if you really want to wear a hat why not just wear a helmet?

Lori B
Dec. 4, 2009, 04:59 PM
Because you can't pull your expensively blonde ponytail through the back of a helmet, silly goose!

faluut42
Dec. 4, 2009, 05:04 PM
If i showed up in the buff at my barn the BO owner would prob just raise her eyebrows and look away (not that i ever would) hehe.I have never been to a barn that has a dress code, I live in the sticks so there isnt much in a way of a dress code.

I ride in breeches, paddock boots, and half chaps. And normally a wife beater (a tank top with thick straps). You can buy them in packs of 3 or 4 and buy them in mens for cheap. They dont stretch out like womens do. Polos dont fit well because i have a small waist and big hips. I dont wear a belt or tuck my shirt in for that reason either. My trainer couldnt care less either in fact prefers them becuase she can see my body in one.

In winter i have a riding jacket but it often gets to hot. I am one of those people that doesnt wear a jacket in 40 degree weather. I wear hoodies sometimes but never in a lesson.

For a clinic or lesson however i do wear a fitted t-shirt.

And my favorite (I have a feeling a few people on here are gona have faces that look like this :eek: when i say what i am about to say). We have a lake that we go camping at with our horses so instead of getting our leather stuff soaked and our clothes sopping wet, we ride out bareback in shorts, and yes sports bras and go swimming in the lake. (like i said we live in the sticks).

farmgirl88
Dec. 4, 2009, 05:31 PM
we've never had a dress code at any barn i had ever ridden at. my friends and i practically lived in our boots and so safety, etc was never a problem. we frequently wore t-shirts or at times fitted, thick strapped tank tops when it was really hot out. I prefer to ride in full leather chaps and i dont see what the big deal is over half chaps. ive always hated having half chaps because they never fit my calves properly.

Ponies were always adorned it cute kid colors like pink, purples, plaids etc. its part of keeping it fun

I would never board at a barn that was going to tell me what i couldnt and could put on my horse and frankly if folks cisiting were appalled at pink and purple plaid saddle pads on our show ponies; my trainer would most likely tell them to leave. You dont need to be robotic, spiffy, black and white adorned rider and horse out there. its truly ok to keep it fun in the barn
our horses were always kept clean, blankets and such hung properly, the barn was spiffy, but we were always just a laid back show barn that was always fun to be at

Horses1011TS
Feb. 25, 2010, 09:48 PM
no dress code at my barn, some people wear comfy pj pants, and some wear polos in the summer and sweatshirts in the winter, everyone must have a cooler for there horse if they own one tho, breeches or jeans, paddock boots or half chaps if u have them or tall boots, saddle pads- anything u ahve and that ur horse is comfortable being ridden in, Everyone who owns a horse in a lesson or not u must have polo wraps or open front boots on ur horse, also lesson horses must have polo wraps or open front boots. My coach is the best one is the area being level 3 hunter/jumper certified, rode with many top showjumpers around the world way back when and is still really close friends with all of them all rode with Ian miller for many many years, danny foster has come and judged a few of our shows as well. sorry off topic.

Catomine
Feb. 25, 2010, 10:14 PM
This probably isn't the same thing, but my horse is boarded at a competitive polo barn and you are laughed at if you show up wearing breeches or tall boots.

But in response to your question, I think a neat turn out is pretty common at a show barn.

Why do they laugh? What do they wear?

jump4me
Feb. 25, 2010, 10:20 PM
Even at the show barn where I worked for a while, there was no dress code other than safe footwear and properly fitting certified helmet. They mostly dressed pretty decently anyway though, don't think I ever saw pj or sweatpants...
If I ever board again I would never board at a place that requires a dress code (other than the boots-and-helmet rule since thats pretty much general safety) but I *personally* don't want to be told I can't ride in jeans, tank tops, t shirts, whatever. Or use my pink saddle pad.
That said, if your a higher-end barn that either has a lot of visitors or people coming in for sales, I think a simple dress code along the lines of: tidy-looking shirt, breeches or tidy-looking pants with either tall boots or half chaps would be fine, ie. don't show up for lessons in your 4-sizes-too-big pj pants and an XXXL tshirt when you normally wear a small.

LowerSaxony_Jumper
Feb. 26, 2010, 03:53 AM
At the barn I board at the moment it`s pretty relaxed. I always wear breeches if I`m going to ride and paddock boots and half chaps. Depending on the temprature I wear a polo shirt and pullover or my sweat jacket.
My horse wears a decent saddle pad and I have black boots. very easy.

When I was working for a big riding school our students were ordert to wear breeches, paddock boots and half chaps/ rubber boots/ tall boots. Helmet of course. We had all kind of students round about 400 per week (with all the clinc riders and the students for the trainer licenses). We wanted them to wear fitting clothes so that the trainer could see the position better. With the kids and the teens around we were pretty relaxed what they wore. as long as u would say its decent.
The head trainer always wanted to see clean tall boots fitting clothes and a presentable look. When you came to his lessons and looked messy or wore to loud colors or put them on your horse he wouldn't treat you with that respect he would have for someone wearing what he liked. He is the head trainer and hes damn good! so I think he was in a position to order it.
for us who worked there it was always clean tall boots( riding, teaching, being in a demonstraion mounted or unmounted), fitting clothes and breeches. Helmet was requiered for jumping and young horses, demonstrations and clincs. If you rode always with one okay! cap was okay and hair was either short or in a ponytail.
Horses decently dressed with pad and boots/polo wraps. For the head trainer always white pad or decently colored(black, grey,dark blue, pale light blue) and wraps!

It's what you want to represent: clean and neat looking rider and clean horse = there is an interesed in the sport! At least you care enough to make your coach not crazy with your clothes

what you wear if just at the barn for mucking or with no lesson is so your problem!:winkgrin:

Tiffany01
Feb. 26, 2010, 07:19 AM
I have/wear:

Navy Breeches
Polo Shirt
Boots
Sweatshirt

My horse wears:

Navy Polos Or Navy Boots
White Pad
Sheepskin Halfpad
Saddle
Girth
Bridle
Black Bell Boots (sometimes)

Coanteen
Feb. 26, 2010, 11:37 AM
No dress code beyond safety (footwear with a heel, helmet). Although my instructor kind of twitches when I sometimes use my bright orange saddle pad.

Lucassb
Feb. 26, 2010, 11:55 AM
I always find this topic interesting.

Never have understood why dressing neatly/professionally is generally assumed to mean snobbery or some sort of indication that the rider values fashion over their horse or riding in general.

I mostly rode lesson horses growing up, and treasured the riding clothes I got - mostly as birthday and christmas gifts! Now that I am an adult and can afford to indulge myself a bit, I love buying and wearing nice breeches, beautiful tack, etc. And I enjoy using that stuff on a daily basis.

From a practical perspective, I prefer breeches since they don't rub me the way jeans do, and are also easier on my saddle. As Findeight noted, I find riding in my tall boots different from riding in paddock shoes and half chaps, so I find it easier to lesson in my talls - this way nothing feels odd or uncomfortable in the show ring. I do wear my half chaps sometimes (if there has been a lot of rain, for example, and I don't want to subject my nice tall boots to the mud.)

I feel more comfortable in a slightly fitted polo (and let's face it, you can get even the nicest brands at the discount stores these days...) or a t-neck and sweater this time of year under a down vest. I do put my hair up under my helmet as I prefer having it out of the way, and I wear gloves since riding without them gives me rubs. I wear the belt because I think it looks neater, and because it is generally more comfortable for me; I frequently find breeches that fit me well in the hips and thighs are just a little big in the waist, so the belt helps keep them from gapping.

Personally I prefer a very traditional and somewhat conservative look for my horse as well - properly fitted, uber clean tack and a simple black or white baby pad under my Mattes pad - and the pads get washed after every use so I don't think there is any practical advantage to other colors (the dirt or sweat is still there even if it's harder to see on that brightly colored model!!)

I guess a lot of you would consider me a snob... but it would be without basis. I wear what I like and am happy to let others do the same. Can't imagine why anyone thinks a certain style indicates any sort of level of commitment, enjoyment or status.

findeight
Feb. 26, 2010, 12:23 PM
We must be getting snow crazy to have this thing up again:lol:.

I always get a kick out the angry "I will never keep my horse at a place with any kind of dress code".

Fine. Don't. But why do you hate those that do and want to argue and turn this into gazzilion pages when it comes up, usually every summer we get a new one?

If you keep at home, wear what you want.

If you keep at a barn that doesn't care, wear whatever you want.

If you keep at a major training facility with lesson program and sale horses, they probably don't want you to wear whatever you feel like.

Pick a barn that you like and agree with and let others do the same without passing all these judgements.

Vixenish
Feb. 26, 2010, 12:54 PM
I don't mind dress codes as long as there's a reason for them. We don't have a dress code that's distributed or posted or anything, but in lessons everyone pretty much wears fitted clothes (so that trainer can actually see what your body is doing) and hunter hair (because if you do it every day, it's much easier to throw it together at a show). We are allowed to wear tank tops because it's always over 90 degrees from May through September, but I understand barns that don't allow it because it can be really greusome if you fall off in a sand ring while you're wearing a tank top (major road rash).

chawley
Feb. 26, 2010, 01:09 PM
I always find this topic interesting.

Never have understood why dressing neatly/professionally is generally assumed to mean snobbery or some sort of indication that the rider values fashion over their horse or riding in general.

I mostly rode lesson horses growing up, and treasured the riding clothes I got - mostly as birthday and christmas gifts! Now that I am an adult and can afford to indulge myself a bit, I love buying and wearing nice breeches, beautiful tack, etc. And I enjoy using that stuff on a daily basis.

From a practical perspective, I prefer breeches since they don't rub me the way jeans do, and are also easier on my saddle. As Findeight noted, I find riding in my tall boots different from riding in paddock shoes and half chaps, so I find it easier to lesson in my talls - this way nothing feels odd or uncomfortable in the show ring. I do wear my half chaps sometimes (if there has been a lot of rain, for example, and I don't want to subject my nice tall boots to the mud.)

I feel more comfortable in a slightly fitted polo (and let's face it, you can get even the nicest brands at the discount stores these days...) or a t-neck and sweater this time of year under a down vest. I do put my hair up under my helmet as I prefer having it out of the way, and I wear gloves since riding without them gives me rubs. I wear the belt because I think it looks neater, and because it is generally more comfortable for me; I frequently find breeches that fit me well in the hips and thighs are just a little big in the waist, so the belt helps keep them from gapping.

Personally I prefer a very traditional and somewhat conservative look for my horse as well - properly fitted, uber clean tack and a simple black or white baby pad under my Mattes pad - and the pads get washed after every use so I don't think there is any practical advantage to other colors (the dirt or sweat is still there even if it's harder to see on that brightly colored model!!)

I guess a lot of you would consider me a snob... but it would be without basis. I wear what I like and am happy to let others do the same. Can't imagine why anyone thinks a certain style indicates any sort of level of commitment, enjoyment or status.

I completely agree Lucassb. Even though riding is my hobby, I approach it the same way I do my career. I work for the Chairman & CEO of a Fortune 200 company, and we are expected to look polished and professional at work. And why would I not want to look my best? When you look and act the part, people take you seriously and you feel more confident. Additionally, it shows respect for your situation and sends the message that you're serious about your craft.

The barn that I ride at doesn't have a dress code, per say, but my trainer has spent many years on the A circuit and really embraces the traditions of our sport. He has certain standards he expects from his clients, and for the most part, everyone is happy to oblige. That doesn't mean you have to wear a certain brand name or whatever, but he expects clothes to be clean, appropriately fitted, w/ hair in your approved helmet and proper footware on at all times. Whether you prefer to school in jeans or breeches is up to you. He does have the less experienced riders wear their tall boots reguarly (not every time) so they are comfortable in them come show season.

AppendixQHLover
Feb. 26, 2010, 01:23 PM
The only dress code is no flip flops and no tank tops.

I have worn flip flops to run the check to the farm or to get something out of my trailer. Never to ride. My toes have been crunched to many times. :D Also..wearing a tank top. There are just some things that are better left to not getting exposed to the sun. :D

HeyJealousy
Feb. 26, 2010, 07:52 PM
My barn doesn't have a dress code, but I do. Polo shirt or fitted tee, breeches, half-chaps and boots. I have a very broken in pair of field boots that I will don for a clinic or a lesson. I show respect for myself, my trainer, and my sport.

However, I think there is a difference in going to the barn to ride and going to the barn to do your barn chores. Obviously, if you're going to be bathing your horse or cleaning his stall, or something similar, you are probably not going to be showing disgrace to the sport or anything else if you wear jeans and sneakers. I am assuming that all the dress codes mentioned are applied to boarders and lesson students, people that are coming to the barn to RIDE (most of us paying for full board aren't going to be mucking our horse's stalls).

costco_muffins
Feb. 26, 2010, 09:34 PM
My barn has a dress code...

http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2471848060082679811aTFRMr

We require everyone to wear tie-dye! Okay, okay, only in summer because it is a summer camp "thing."

Catomine
Feb. 26, 2010, 10:38 PM
I always find this topic interesting.

Never have understood why dressing neatly/professionally is generally assumed to mean snobbery or some sort of indication that the rider values fashion over their horse or riding in general.

I mostly rode lesson horses growing up, and treasured the riding clothes I got - mostly as birthday and christmas gifts! Now that I am an adult and can afford to indulge myself a bit, I love buying and wearing nice breeches, beautiful tack, etc. And I enjoy using that stuff on a daily basis.

From a practical perspective, I prefer breeches since they don't rub me the way jeans do, and are also easier on my saddle. As Findeight noted, I find riding in my tall boots different from riding in paddock shoes and half chaps, so I find it easier to lesson in my talls - this way nothing feels odd or uncomfortable in the show ring. I do wear my half chaps sometimes (if there has been a lot of rain, for example, and I don't want to subject my nice tall boots to the mud.)

I feel more comfortable in a slightly fitted polo (and let's face it, you can get even the nicest brands at the discount stores these days...) or a t-neck and sweater this time of year under a down vest. I do put my hair up under my helmet as I prefer having it out of the way, and I wear gloves since riding without them gives me rubs. I wear the belt because I think it looks neater, and because it is generally more comfortable for me; I frequently find breeches that fit me well in the hips and thighs are just a little big in the waist, so the belt helps keep them from gapping.

Personally I prefer a very traditional and somewhat conservative look for my horse as well - properly fitted, uber clean tack and a simple black or white baby pad under my Mattes pad - and the pads get washed after every use so I don't think there is any practical advantage to other colors (the dirt or sweat is still there even if it's harder to see on that brightly colored model!!)

I guess a lot of you would consider me a snob... but it would be without basis. I wear what I like and am happy to let others do the same. Can't imagine why anyone thinks a certain style indicates any sort of level of commitment, enjoyment or status.

This is how I am as well- and I'm not a snob. I'm more traditional- a nice polo shirt, either khaki or dark grey breeches with my tall boots, black gloves, white fitted saddle pad, clean tack, and black boots open-front on horse. I hate riding in baggy tee's because I think they make you look like you're slouching, even if you're not. I like to look more classic than trendy I guess. I love my tall boots. I love to shop for riding clothes- so I enjoy looking good, even if we're just at home!

There is one girl with IMO very tacky taste- she is SUCH a good rider but your can't see it between the 8 sizes too big shirt, lime green and black flames saddle pad, bright yellow polos and dirty suede half chaps! My trainer comments on it but isn't the type to MAKE anyone conform to her personal standard.

billiebob
Feb. 27, 2010, 12:32 AM
Our barn has some very informal rules regarding dress. All we require are long pants, appropriate/approved footwear and helmet, and long hair has to be secured out of the way whether in a ponytail or a hairnet. Horses are allowed to wear whatever (some of us, including me, have some that are very brightly patterned--I have one with polar bears and snowflakes. I'm 29 btw :D). I'm the only one who uses polos on a regular basis. Everyone else who uses leg protection uses splint boots or open fronts.

I don't think I'd be very keen on having a formal dress code. I've always been barn staff, never just a rider, so I'm normally kind of grubby. I'd rather not trash my nicer riding clothes. And I would so rebel against the dictating saddle pad colors--for everyday riding. If you're going off the farm for a show or clinic, yeah, I get that.

Tobias
Feb. 27, 2010, 12:44 AM
No, other than a helmet and appropriate footwear. I pay to board there, no one needs to tell me what I have to wear to go play with my mud ball horse. I mean he is a HORSE...he rolls in his own crap, I don't think I need to be required to be in tan breeches, a polo and expensive tall boots everyday to ride him. Often times I do just roll out of bed and go see him, but I do wear breeches, a tshirt, half chaps and boots.
.


I Agree 100% My sister and i are basically the only ones are our barn who ride now. but where I used to be at a training barn, I worked for 5 hours in 100+ weather in the sun blazing hot sun, my trainer was mostly concerned that I did things right. If someone showed up to look at a horse, then yes I would dress up, or if I had a scheduled lesson (most were just spur of the moment), yes I would be in my show breeches, belt, tall boots, and gloves, and a wife beater. She didn't care about the shirt, it was HOT!!!!! in the winter (or at least thats what they call it out here) it rains a little and everyone is afraid to come out and rings are closed!

Gray Horse H/J
Feb. 27, 2010, 02:21 PM
My barn does not. It's a very wide range of H/J riders, dressage riders, Western riders, lesson kids. Some people show the As, some people the Bs, some just schooling shows, and many don't show at all.

So nope, no dress code. But honestly, in the 3 years I've boarded there I can't recall seeing anyone dressed inappropriatley. My daily barn look is:

Fitted jeans, either boot cut or straight leg
Paddock boots
Fitted shirt - a sweater in the colder weather, fitted tees or tanks (wide strap tanks, no spaghetti straps for me)
Half chaps and helmet w/hairnet to ride

I haven't worn breeches and tall boots in Lord knows how long. So while I don't look ready to ride in a BNT's clinic, I always look neat and clean, which to me is enough.

Also, the only saddle pads I even use are black, white, navy or green baby pads. I personally despise loud colors, and I hate polos.

I wouldn't board somewhere that required breeches and boots every day. I don't show, my horse and I are not in training of any kind. To me it doesn't seem necessary. But I would also not want to board somewhere with people running around with everything hanging out, and more skin showing than not. Blech.

BastiantheWonderDragon
Feb. 27, 2010, 04:41 PM
No dress code beyond safety (footwear with a heel, helmet). Although my instructor kind of twitches when I sometimes use my bright orange saddle pad.

:lol: I had an instructor that really liked to be traditional in a dressag-y way (she is also a good friend) so I would always ride in my most obnoxious saddle pad and polos/boots while I was schooling on my own or in lessons. She would always comment on my choices, but did not otherwise care. I know it made her twitch a little though!

I've since moved to a new barn because I had to move for a job and I've found myself dressing more appropriately, tucking in my shirt and I purchased several vests that look pretty cool (IMO). The atmosphere at my new barn is more professional and I like the influence it has had on my.

I also continue to use my "fun" pads and polos, but try to colour co-ordinate them a bit more and stick with an overall colour theme for a few weeks before changing. (Today was diagonal polo pairs, solid blue paired with blue with happy stars on them)

I love my horse and part of the fun for me is having co-ordinated clothes and matching outfits. I don't get into people fashion, but horse-fashion is a hoot!

Cloverbarley
Feb. 27, 2010, 06:39 PM
No I don't have a dress code at my farm. I do not have any children here, all my boarders are adults and most are professional career people. They can wear whatever they like, and that includes whether they wish to wear a helmet or not.

If I am riding English (which is increasingly rare these days) then I always ride in leather seated breeches and long leather boots. On top? Depends on the weather; if it is summer then I wear strappy tops and if winter then normally lots of clothes and a big puffy down jacket.

If I am riding western then I ride in jeans and either paddock boots or cowboy boots. Tops; same as above.

If I am riding bareback then I ride in jeans in the winter and shorts in the summer. Tops; same as above.

As for VPL; thongs all the way, no matter whether it is summer, winter, English, western or bareback. No way could I stand to wear granny underpants in life away from horses, let alone ride in them...bleurgh

Mukluk
Jun. 20, 2010, 05:50 PM
I think the dress code is something like "keep private parts covered".... Although the owners husband would probably be OK if we didn't:lol:

Mukluk
Jun. 20, 2010, 05:53 PM
IWe have a lake that we go camping at with our horses so instead of getting our leather stuff soaked and our clothes sopping wet, we ride out bareback in shorts, and yes sports bras and go swimming in the lake. (like i said we live in the sticks).
Sounds great to me!!!

iEquitate
Jun. 20, 2010, 06:22 PM
I was just rereading an old issue of practical horseman with a story on top pony trainer Charlie Moorcraft of Lee Hill Farm (Lee Hill Gold Rush, etc) and he said that he required that the children all be in tucked in polos, clean boots, and hairnets. I tend to wear that myself to lessons too :P

Velvet
Jun. 20, 2010, 06:30 PM
No thank goodness. But then again I'm at an all adult barn and no one there is wearing anything offensive.

I just stopped by this thread out of curiosity and saw your reply, Bogie. I was surprised to hear anyone would have a dress code at a barn, but based on your reply I can now understand it. As an adult, I'd hate to look at girls belly rings sticking out, bra straps hanging down, or thongs sticking out above low cut breeches. I guess I can see where some places are requiring a certain type of dress. When I was young, you just dressed appropriately (which meant in the correct clothes for riding and tastefully covering your body).

I'm also at a grown ups barn. Even if people are casual, no one is wearing anything vulgar or indecent.

meupatdoes
Jun. 20, 2010, 06:39 PM
Seriously. I know that not everyone can afford to wear nice clothes every day, but don't look like you rolled out of bed either.

I am tired of people who claim that it is "too expensive" to dress nice.

There are collared shirts at Target for $6.
They cost exactly the same some heinous tatoo t-shirt; it just involves making a different choice in the store.

Also, TUCKING IN a shirt is free.


To me, dress is part of the "Kung Fu" principle. It is basically an expression of your dedication, discipline and quiet focus.

It is no more difficult, expensive, or uncomfortable to wear a polo to the barn than a ratty untucked T-shirt, but some people INSIST on telling the world how 'sloppy' and 'comfortable' they need to be.

maudie
Jun. 20, 2010, 07:13 PM
The place I'm going to has their dress code on their website, lol.

Basically it's:

-well fitting shirt with sleeves
-breeches or *nice* jeans
-tall boots or half chaps and paddock boots
-hair up inside helmet
-approved helmet

and my favorite "no sparkley crap"

blackcat95
Jun. 20, 2010, 07:49 PM
The barn I'm at doesn't really have a dress code but:

-Approved elmet is required (duh!)
-Boots with a heel
-Nothing super bling-y or sparkly

Most people wear their hair up with a net, except for the SS kids who wear braids or ponytails. Everyone wears jeans/breeches, half chaps, and paddock boots. One girl has tall boots that she schools in. It's low key.

Beethoven
Jun. 21, 2010, 10:34 AM
No, Thank God! I would not ride at a barn that did. I am sorry, but as long as your boobs and stomach is covered than wear what you want. Also appropriate foot wear. I HATE POLO SHIRTS!! Really I hate them more than anything in the world! I HATE TUCKING IN SHIRTS!!! Really Its my second biggest hate in the world. WHY?? Because I went to private school where that was the dress code. I am sorry but when I am at the barn I want to be relaxed and comfortable.

Since when does what you wear make you a better rider?? Never has effected me. At a show or clinic, yes by all means a polo/Show clothes and nice breeches and tall boots, but at home no way.

Anyone ever noticed horses are dirty filthy animals that live outside! Why do I want to wear my nice expensive riding clothes everyday to get ruined? Sorry, but I am not made of money.

I usually wear t-shirt/tank top with a sports bra, schooling breeches/tights, boots/half chaps and hair up in a hairnet with a helmet on in summer. In the winter, I wear appropriate clothes for the cold on top and the same on bottom.

Really I am paying a trainer to teach me to ride not how to dress. :yes: I have been a professional for 4 yrs now and I would much rather a rider being more concerned on learning to ride than what they are wearing, but hey that's just me! No, bikini tops or just sports bras would never fly, or riding in shorts but I think that's obvious.

Now, maybe, had I not gone to a private school from kindergarten to 12th grade then I would have a different opinion about the whole dress code thing.

Okay, rant over.

spacytracy
Jun. 21, 2010, 10:52 AM
As long as it was safe, my trainer didn't care what we wore.

Since I'm at home now you can expect to see me in no bra, loose tshirt, pj pants, messy ponytail, bags under my eyes, and possibly (gasp!) flip flops.
If you're lucky I have my bathrobe on.

The horses don't care what I feed them in, and the poop doesn't care what I pick it up in.

SmartAlex
Jun. 21, 2010, 10:56 AM
This thread makes me chuckle because I board at my mother's private barn, so basically "at home", and I still have a self imposed dress code. This is because I have always been affected by foreign feeling "show clothes". So, I set out to get myself desensitised to the outfit. Now my tall boots are broken in, and my breeches are old friends. Riding in jeans now feels foreign.

Plus, I always look presentable if I have a photo taken for my blog. ;)