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DownYonder
Nov. 30, 2009, 06:18 PM
For those that have used Today or Tomorrow cow mastitis treatments for thrush - how much do you use, how often, and for how long?

Horse has chronic thrush in two feet. We have tried ALL the traditional thrush remedies and cannot get it completely cleared up. We now have a 12 syringe package of Today - do we apply a half syringe (full syringe seems like overkill) to each foot daily, 2X daily, or what? And for how many days?

GallopingGrape
Nov. 30, 2009, 06:27 PM
Just apply enough to cover the surface area of the thrush!! Apply it until its gone. (a couple days? A week? Depends on your horse and how dry you can keep his feet. Its the best remedy we've tried.

lolalola
Nov. 30, 2009, 06:33 PM
One application of Tomorrow cleared up thrush in a rescue horse - was really surprised how quickly it did the job.

jaimebaker
Nov. 30, 2009, 06:49 PM
I don't know if Today will do anything for thrush as I've never used it. But I know Tomorrow will clear it up pretty darn quickly. As far as amount I just squirt enough in there to cover the affected areas. The most I've had to use it is twice, but these weren't horrendous cases of thrush either. If it's somewhere you can squirt it and pack a cotton ball on it, that will work too.

Again, not sure about the Today product (cephapirin sodium) since it's different than Tomorrow (cephapirin benzathine).

caballus
Nov. 30, 2009, 07:14 PM
I've used "Tomorrow" the DRY mastitis treatment and only had to use a couple of applications.

Robin@DHH
Nov. 30, 2009, 07:39 PM
I asked my vet which of these two would be preferable
to use. He explained that Tomorrow is formulated to be
more persistant in the animal's system than Today. When
we use this for thrush, we try to get well up between the
heels into the cavity above and then add medication until
we see it coming back out. If that takes a whole syringe,
there is obviously a major problem and that much medication
is desirable. Usually one syringe will treat for 2-3 days.

NorCalDressage
Nov. 30, 2009, 09:04 PM
For those that have used Today or Tomorrow cow mastitis treatments for thrush - how much do you use, how often, and for how long?

Horse has chronic thrush in two feet. We have tried ALL the traditional thrush remedies and cannot get it completely cleared up. We now have a 12 syringe package of Today - do we apply a half syringe (full syringe seems like overkill) to each foot daily, 2X daily, or what? And for how many days?

I used Tomorrow -

In the begining I used almost a full tube each foot, but there were lots of "crevices" and I was going full out :lol:

I did that for about 5-7 days, then went to half a tube for another week. Cleared it up, didn't return. Applied once a day. I would pick the foot really cleanly, apply the Tomorrow, hold foot up for a few seconds for it to seep in and that was it.

I had previously tried everything else under the sun, with no results.

Calvincrowe
Nov. 30, 2009, 10:13 PM
I've used both. Freaking miracle drugs in a $4 tube. Best kept secret of the horse health world, frankly. God bless my farrier for telling me about it. Cleared up a heel bulb infection in an aged horse in one week. :)

Daydream Believer
Nov. 30, 2009, 10:16 PM
I sell the stuff off my truck when my trim clients want a tube or two. It's cheaper to buy a case but not everyone wants that much of it. Seems like one tube per foot...about a week's supply...clears up even nasty cases. For more mild cases, I'd use it every other day for a week. It really is remarkable how well it works. I've seen nothing better.

BoysNightOut
Dec. 1, 2009, 05:20 AM
I use neither. I use the US Vet Go-Dry. It's the one with Penicillin, not cephapirin (Have used Today and Tomorrow with absolutely no results before). It's been very muddy here, but I squirt a little bit into each front foot (back feet have been ok) every day to keep the thrush in check. Just waiting for the ground to freeze....I hate mud!

DownYonder
Dec. 1, 2009, 06:10 AM
Thanks for the info. Our local Tractor Supply did not have ToMorrow in stock, so since I had made a 30 mile trip to the store, I went ahead and got the ToDay.

Another question regarding dosages - if we only use enough to cover the affected area on each foot, is that a strong enough concentration to do any good? And aren't most antibiotic treatments prescribed for 10 days? I am concerned the bacteria may develop a resistance if we don't use a heavy enough dose for long enough to COMPLETELY kill it off.

BoysNightOut - if the ToDay doesn't work, I will try either ToMorrow (if I can find it) or Go-Dry.

Oldenburg Mom
Dec. 1, 2009, 07:50 AM
DownYonder,

I had a horrible case of thrush a number of years ago (well, I didn't the horse did :lol:) ... it had eaten away 70% of the frog, and there was a hole in the hoof. It was AWFUL.

My farrier, God bless him, told me to use Cefa-Lak (http://www.allivet.com/Cefa-Lak-p/25059.htm) and NEVER use the traditional treatments with this serious of a case as they have formaldehyde in them, which can get into the blood stream. This was the *daily* regime, and IMHO, just punishment for not being more careful with my horse's feet:

Warm/hot water. Scrub brush. Dish washing soap (antibacterial.) Pick the hoof,.. careful with the hole in the frog...then scrub all four hooves. He had thrush in all four hooves, but the worst was the back left, the next worst was the back right.
Use one tube of Cefa-Lak. Make SURE to get it into the hole that is between the bulbs of the hoof. That's what that long tube is best for.
I always did the boy first, them I put him in his stall while I did the rest of my chores, ... about 1/2 an hour. Then I turned him out, even though it was muddy.He began feeling better almost immediately. Part of the reason is Cefa-Lak is oil based, so it penetrates and "stays" longer than anything that might be water based. I'd say it took about two months to get everything back to normal ... I'm guessing as it was a number of years ago. BUT, the first indication that everything was going well was that hole in the bulbs ... within a week or so, I couldn't get the thin tube down the hole as it had pretty much closed/healed.

The biggest pain the in the neck was scrubbing the feet. Oh, and keeping his stall immaculate! Absolutely *no* urine—not even a trace—at all.

Hope this helps. I've been obsessed with thrush ever since ... and have never had another case.

Gee, talk about reading for comprehension :rolleyes: I surely didn't. Sorry about that, OP, you were asking about two specific products! I hope this might help though, as I believe they are similar.

Robin@DHH
Dec. 1, 2009, 08:56 AM
Cefa-lak = Today and Cefa-dri= Tomorrow. The formulations
of Cefa-lak and Today are pretty much the same stuff so
I would buy whichever of these is cheaper (or available).

mhtokay
Dec. 1, 2009, 09:15 AM
I think the dry cow treatments have 2 antibiotics in them.... plus it's meant to stay in the cow longer, so shouldn't be used in lactating cows.

I've used both on thrush (or scratches) with good results, but try to get dry cow, if it's available. I rarely treat more than once.

NorCalDressage
Dec. 1, 2009, 09:34 AM
One other tip, if the tubes have been sitting on a shelf for a while.....

I found it useful to shake the tube before I opened the cap and applied. Sometimes it would be a bit "watery" at the lower end of the tube. Kinda like the ketchup bottle maybe.....

jaimebaker
Dec. 1, 2009, 11:49 AM
And aren't most antibiotic treatments prescribed for 10 days? I am concerned the bacteria may develop a resistance if we don't use a heavy enough dose for long enough to COMPLETELY kill it off.



I think you are thinking of internal antibiotics (feed through, injections). Even with antibiotic eye ointment you don't do it for 10 days. You do it until the problem is cleared and then do an extra day or two to be safe.

Thrush is in the soil and is a bacteria. You just have to get the dead material out of the hoof, debrided and kill what's there. You have to get out as much of the thrush as you can with the hoof pick before you apply anything. Air kills it. Proper trimming and diet also play a big role as well. Stay on top of it for prevention (use something once a week, even just plain betadine is fine).

Woodsperson
Dec. 1, 2009, 06:32 PM
And once I get it cleared up I dose with Tomorrow at the least whiff of thrush and sometimes will dose when we are having recurrent we weather that usually leads to thrush (only about 1/4 a tube per foot).

DMK
Dec. 1, 2009, 08:18 PM
Jeffers livestock has Cefi-dry for $25/12 tubes, generally when I order on Wed I have it by Friday here in Atlanta (you need $50 for free shipping, but you can combine equine/livestock orders)

Watermark Farm
Dec. 2, 2009, 12:34 AM
Try Usnea herbal tincture. Order it online from a herbal/homeopathic type place (herbalcom.com is one) or get through Whole Foods, etc. My gelding has had chronic thrush all his life and a farrier turned me on to this. It was like a miracle to me.

Alibhai's Alibar
Dec. 2, 2009, 03:48 PM
I use neither. I use the US Vet Go-Dry. It's the one with Penicillin, not cephapirin (Have used Today and Tomorrow with absolutely no results before). It's been very muddy here, but I squirt a little bit into each front foot (back feet have been ok) every day to keep the thrush in check. Just waiting for the ground to freeze....I hate mud!

Not much help with the OP, but I've had very good results with Go Dry (http://www.americanlivestock.com/pc-16394-15042-go-dry.aspx) as well. Way better than Thrushbuster, etc. For a horse with an issue, I apply it daily until it is gone and I've never had to use it for more than a few days in a row. I use enough to cover the affected area daily. On extremely bad cases, my friends have soaked cotton balls with Go-Dry and stuffed them between the heel bulbs or in any thrushy crevices. Generally, they fall out on their own.

luckeys71
Dec. 9, 2009, 09:17 PM
mhtokay-You said you've used Tomorrow on scratches. How often and how long did you treat? Did you then treat with any Desitin or ointment?
Has anyone else used it on skin? My mare has been fighting a nasty infection on her back white legs. The fact that this is now our 6th wettest year on record is NOT helping. I don't ever think I've seen rain and mud like this. She stays out all the time. I have a couple tubes of Tomorrow, so thought I'd give it a try on those legs.

mhtokay
Dec. 10, 2009, 07:50 AM
mhtokay-You said you've used Tomorrow on scratches. How often and how long did you treat? Did you then treat with any Desitin or ointment?
Has anyone else used it on skin? My mare has been fighting a nasty infection on her back white legs. The fact that this is now our 6th wettest year on record is NOT helping. I don't ever think I've seen rain and mud like this. She stays out all the time. I have a couple tubes of Tomorrow, so thought I'd give it a try on those legs.

I've rarely had to treat more than once. I have a lot of horses. So I'll walk by one outside when I'm feeding and say "oh yeah, I should get him in and deal with that". So I finally get him in and put the tomorrow on and cover with Desitin. I like Desitin as it's so hard to wash off. I figure it'll help keep the Tomorrow on. I don't pick the scabs... never have, they hate that! So the yearling I got in earlier this summer and treated once, went back out in the field with wet grass. I saw him the next day or so and thought, darn the stuff came off! But several more days went by before I thought about getting him in again to treat him and by then they'd about fallen off.

If you try Tomorrow and it doesn't work, it might be something else. I have a friend with a nasty scratches-looking thing on one horse this year that took betadine to clear up. It was ugly, and maybe something more deep seated and that horse has an issue every year. She probably has an immunity issue and/or clover sensitivity.

My vet has had me use it in a wound already. Ya gotta figure if you can put it inside an udder, it's not going to be caustic.

equineartworks
Dec. 10, 2009, 09:13 AM
I get QuarterMaster from the vet. It is about $5 per tube but *I think* it's about 10 times the potency of the Go-Dry. Three days...gone...for regular thrush, it was about a week for the deep sulcus thrush that Paco had when we pulled him and brought him home.

I keep Go Dry on hand to use in emergencies.

luckeys71
Dec. 13, 2009, 04:30 PM
Preliminary report on ToMorrow use on nasty leg skin infection...it appears to be working! This is not just simple scratches, as it goes all the way up the white on her rear legs. I bred this mare and she has had it every year, since she was a yearling, except last year (4 yo year). This is definitely the worst, so far. I was away for a week and it got really out of hand. I don't feel like I can ask anyone to treat her, when I'm not there, because it is such a rodeo. If I get kicked, it is my own fault, but I don't want to put anyone else at risk. She is such a whimp and once she thinks something hurts, it doesn't matter if it really does. Getting a needle into this horse is, also, a rodeo, but if you blindfold her, you can easily give her all her vaccinations at once, because she doesn't "know" it is going to hurt. After several years of treating the skin, all I have to do is look for scabs(which I do EVERY time I pick her feet, all year long!) and she gets mad, even when there aren't any, so you know it can't hurt. Fortunately, she doesn't kick AT you, just wants to kick her feet out of your hands. She could do some real damage, large horse, small cross ties, if she meant to hurt you. Last night was the third application of ToMorrow onto her legs. The day after the first application, I felt like she was much less sensitive and more tolerant of having the legs handled and treated. Last night, she was quite tolerant, not happy about it, but fairly easily allowing me to wash, dry, and treat them. I think the sore skin had less scabs and looked less inflammed. I have been applying the ToMorrow after washing with a Chlorohexadine and Ketoconazole shampoo, then applying the secret sauce (Desitin, triple antiobiotic ointment, cortisone ointment mixture) after giving the ToMorrow a few minutes to sit on there. I'm very excited that this stuff might be the real deal! Now, if it would ever stop raining!

sedaistable
Dec. 25, 2009, 01:07 AM
I love the cow stuff!!! If you covor affected area then pack with cotton balls as suggested and shove them down into the hoof with your pick the cotton balls will stay a while and it will work longer.It will not put enough pressure on the foot to hurt itIm not sure I would put them into super deep holes though.Best if done in a stall.Wouldnt want our ponies eating pesky cottonballs in the field!

My gelding had a very bad case and it took 3 or 4 days.Then I went back to yucky koppertox just as a waterproof barrier.

BONUS--today is awesome for deep puncture wounds anywhere.My vet said it kills clostridia.Doesnt mean he doesnt think I need to vaccinate for tetanus,but today helps protect against it.He told me to use it on a new horse--vaccination unknown--deep puncture on face.Filled in and healed in 3 days!!

KayBee
Dec. 28, 2009, 09:42 AM
Just wanted to say thanks for this thread. I've been riding a schoolie who had... nasty thrush and Tomorrow seems to have done the trick (am pretty sure the poor boy had deep succulus thrush).

So, thanks! (And, yes, did clear treating him with tomorrow with my trainer, etc. ;-)

mboynton
Jan. 9, 2010, 08:14 PM
I have had good luck/fast results with these products, my vet and farrier say it makes no difference which is used on thrush. Vet says there is significant drying effect and use on alternate days is probably sufficient. I have had it knock out thrush in a week, tho on this particular horse, it did come back. For cold weather users, my farrier reminds me to warm the tube a bit before using -- because the tip is less flexible when cold and can snap off in crevices in horse's hoof! I esp love this product because of its ease of administration under snow pads!

lolalola
Jan. 9, 2010, 09:24 PM
My vet told me the same thing about using Tomorrow for puncture wounds.

Gry2Yng
Jan. 9, 2010, 10:53 PM
As long a this thread came back to the top...

Both my geldings had/have thrush. The TB was the milder case, but he was a grade 1 lame in the RF. The WB should have been 2 legged based on the way his frogs looked, but he was sound. I did several treatments of White Lightning, as I was worried about fungus. Then started with the Dry Cow and athlete's foot treatment. Farrier was out yesterday. TB is clean and sound. WB still has some thrush, but it is vastly improved. I would say TB went 95% sound after the first day of treatment. After 4 or 5 days he had a re-occurance. 2 weeks total and now I am using durasole.

WB is three weeks and counting. I KNEW he had thrush and was treating him. When the TB came up lame I decided to treat him as well.

Both these horses were recently moved from another barn that had a lot of problems with fungus, mostly on the horses bodies. There is no problem with thrush in my new barn so I am hoping once I get this resolved, it will stay gone. Of course I will keep a close eye on it. I may just soak with WL as a matter of course once every month. Especially on the WB.

Tom Stovall
Jan. 11, 2010, 09:15 AM
Oldenburg Mom in gray stuff deleted

My farrier, God bless him, told me to use Cefa-Lak (http://www.allivet.com/Cefa-Lak-p/25059.htm) and NEVER use the traditional treatments with this serious of a case as they have formaldehyde in them, which can get into the blood stream...

Without comment on the efficacy of any of the products recommended in this thread, please be aware that the aldehydes (formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde, etc.) contained in various topicals intended for use on the frog and sole cannot possibly "get into the blood stream" when used as directed.

Oldenburg Mom
Jan. 11, 2010, 12:33 PM
...please be aware that the aldehydes (formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde, etc.) contained in various topicals intended for use on the frog and sole cannot possibly "get into the blood stream" when used as directed.

Oh, wow, I didn't know this. Even if you've got a hole in the frog that goes 1/2" down into the hoof? I would have thought, silly me, that the product could cross the "tissue barrier" (I don't know what else to call it!! :lol:)? You know, rather like chemicals can be absorbed into the body, and bloodstream, through the skin (e.g., trans-dermal patches)?

Wow, maybe I'm wrong on both counts! You can learn so much on CoTH ...

Gry2Yng
Jan. 11, 2010, 03:51 PM
I am no biologist, but a chemical has to have a certain molecular size to be absorbed thru the skin. Someone can correct me if I am wrong. DMSO is often used to help "pull" something thru the skin. Again, layman!!!!!