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Equestryn
Nov. 30, 2009, 01:54 PM
I have a 15 acre pasture that has been wonderful this summer. It has supported 5 horses on full time turn out with no dragging, round bales or anything. Now that it's not raining as much here in Florida, the grass is getting shorter (which is expected) and I'll be buying hay rolls here soon.

The manure is starting to show more than it used to. It's more noticable due to the grass being shorter and the rain isn't dissolving the maure piles. I've drug the WHOLE field with a 3x3 home made drag hooked to the back of the lawn mower. It did the job but not even a week later, the pasture looked as if I hadn't drug it at all.

How often should one drag the field? I don't want it looking poopy.

I drag my smaller paddocks close to once per week.

Thanks!

Tamara in TN
Nov. 30, 2009, 01:57 PM
How often should one drag the field? I don't want it looking poopy.
I drag my smaller paddocks close to once per week.

Thanks!


I also HATE the "feedlot" look...I use JD 6000 series tires cut in half and I drag as often as I get the "feedlot" feeling...

about once a week...and it's better for the ground to spread the nutrients around and not in bleccky piles;)

msj
Nov. 30, 2009, 03:52 PM
I rotate my pastures usually every week but if we've had a wet summer, like the last 2, I generally go 2 wks. I drag the pasture with a york rake behind my mower immediately when I move the horses to a new pasture. If it is dry enough a wk later I try and drag that pasture again as the manure that has been pulled loose from the 'pile' will have dried out and will be able to be broken up again. It's worked well for the last 20 yrs but I'm up north too.

goodhors
Nov. 30, 2009, 05:46 PM
Not sure what kind of drag your home made one is, but sometimes you just have to drag often.

I have done the tractor tire drag like Tamara, and they do a nice job. Seem to do a nice job of smoothing the rough dirt left with rainy weather up here. Our clay dirt holds footprints and tire marks for a while if not smoothed out.

I also have a chain drag, with teeth on one side, smooth links on the other. I love it, but it seems to need additional weight to make it really break up manure piles on the smooth side or drag the teeth thru the grass and smooth out the hidden manure. Got it at TSC, it is one of my favorite tools. I think it is 4' x 6', but they have smaller ones too.

I add weight with old tires on the drag part, which hold the drag down much better for getting my jobs done. Easy to add or remove tires, still can add up to a good weight for dragging.

FairWeather
Dec. 1, 2009, 07:19 AM
i'm using a giant crate--works great! but needs to be done once a week or once every two weeks for optimal results.

WaningMoon
Dec. 1, 2009, 07:30 AM
When we were dairy farming we always used a hitch of trees. Several young trees or tall brush from the woods. We didn't have a manure spreader, we had a trailer and threw out all the manure by hand. We then drove the hitch of trees over it and it did a great job.

blueboo
Dec. 1, 2009, 09:39 AM
I use a 4x6 foot section of heavy wire panel (4x4 inch squares) on the back of my ATV. We have 2 horses on a 15 or so acre pasture, and had a lot of rain this summer, so I only had to do it about 5 times all summer. Next year I plan on formalizing it with a bit of weight on the panel so I don't have to go over the piles so often (there's an old car tire that came down the creek which I think should do nicely for a weight :D)

chai
Dec. 1, 2009, 12:20 PM
We have a York Rake attachment for our tractor and it works really well. I've also heard of people using a section of chain link fence to do the same thing.