PDA

View Full Version : Ford F150 and a Gooseneck



Equestryn
Nov. 30, 2009, 01:47 PM
I have purchased an '02 F150 4x4 extended cab for hauling hay, feed and the bumper pull 2 horse trailer.

I've been thinking about trailers. I'd like a 3 horse trailer. My truck hauls the 2 horse BPs really well. No complaints there. I'm worried about the 3 horse trailers. 3 horse BPs are harder to find. 3 horse Goosenecks are pretty available.

Does anyone pull a gooseneck with an F150? I saw one on the highway a few weeks ago and it looked okay. It was identical to mine pulling a 3 horse GN with a tack room. One of my boarders uses a GMC Sierra 1500 Z71 to pull her 2 horse GN.

I just want to make sure I'm not completely nuts for thinking that my F150 would be capable of pulling a 3 horse gooseneck. I know a 250 would be better but my budget just wasn't available for any of the 250s I found.

Another question about trucks, does the 4x4 decrease the towing capacity? I was always told that 4x4s would be a better idea just in case of trouble but someone said the other day that the four wheel drive decreases towing... I'm second guessing now.

Anyway, I'm rambling. Thanks for your input!

ChocoMare
Nov. 30, 2009, 01:51 PM
I wouldn't do it. It does put quite the strain on the engine & tranny going up hill. Also, you'd want more weight in a truck to stabilize the weight of the trailer in the rare event of loss of brakes, etc.

wildlifer
Nov. 30, 2009, 03:29 PM
Don't do it. A friend of mine hauls her 2H GN with her F150 4X4. It pulls it. But you can about hear the transmission slowly burning up and they had to install air bladder suspension in the rear to keep it from being just plain scary to haul. I would definitely not pull three horses with it. We hauled 3 horses in a GN behind a Chevy 2500 (3/4 ton) gas engine last weekend and it was working its TAIL off, I would rather have used my 250 diesel, but I keep a camper shell on it and perfer a bumper pull with it. Of course, you are already going to get miserable mileage pulling with the 1/2 ton.

You will see people doing it. Lots of people do it. But I can promise you they are paying the repair/replacement bills as a price. At which point you could have just spent the money on the 250 up front and pulled whatever you wanted. Just because people do it, doesn't mean it's a great idea....

4X4 does not in and of itself do anything to tow capacity. It does decrease tow capacity WHEN IT IS ENGAGED. Also, in the F150, when the 4x4 option is added, they use the 3/4 ton axles most of the time, instead of the 1/2 tons axles, so you get a little extra strength there. Mostly 4x4 just means more weight on the truck, reduced mileage, and more front end issues and in the south, I just never used it, so I traded mine in and current truck is a 2WD. I figure if I get stuck at a show, I am surrounded by trucks and tractors!

Length is also going to be an issue, even though it's a gooseneck. You still have to fit 3 horses back there and you have a fairly lightweight truck to balance out that much weight should the unexpected occur. I just wouldn't feel comfortable putting my own horse in that situation.

OneMoreForTheRoad
Nov. 30, 2009, 03:30 PM
I wouldn't do it either. I have an F250 diesel and it struggles sometimes with my aluminum 3h gooseneck. Well it only struggles when the trailer has 3 horses, hay and feed in it and we're going up really steep hills...

Trixie
Nov. 30, 2009, 03:33 PM
Wouldn't.

katarine
Nov. 30, 2009, 03:46 PM
Which 150 did you buy? We owned one that was rated for 7700 lbs. I don't recall the specifics, but it was a rare duck- in the 5 yrs we owned it I saw only 1-2 others set up like it. I pulled a 3H GN aluminum trailer with tiny 4' short wall LQ. I never hauled 3 horses loaded to camp, just two. That maxed out what that truck could do. I DID haul three horses from time to time, but again, not to camp (so not hauling 30 gallons of water, three bales of hay, etc for example). That maxed out what that truck could do.

You are in Tallahassee so that helps in terms of FLAT land hauling. You MIGHT could manage a 3H barebones aluminum stock, but again...only if you bought a beefed up 150 like the one we had (firmer suspension, extra stuff under the hood to cool the engine, obviously I can't remember much about it LOL)

4X$ has nothing to do with hauling capacity day in and day out, sorry.

SuperSTB
Nov. 30, 2009, 04:08 PM
Not for a 2002 model which not as beefy as the recent F150's.

The company I worked for in the early 2000's had an enormous Ford fleet from F150 up to F650's. There was a distinct and very obvious difference between a 2002 F150 and a F250 then. I would consider a late model F150 closer to a F250 from the early 2000's.

I have a late model F150 with the larger engine and set up for trailering. It's much better than the F150's (2000-2004) that I used to drive for work. Still I won't go more than a 2H w/tack. I could do a 3H goose w/o tack as long as I'm not throwing big horses in back.

tangledweb
Nov. 30, 2009, 04:37 PM
You need to start by looking at what you can legally tow based on what the manufacturer specified for that exact vehicle. An 02 F150 could have a tow capacity from about 4000 to about 9000 pounds depending on which version. 4x4 is one option that might affect it a little, but engine and axle ratio will be bigger factors.

For bigger trucks you often get a higher capacity with a gooseneck or 5th wheel hitch. For an F150 it will probably be very similar to the bumper limit.

You might be legal for a basic 3H, or you might not. How you hook it up will probably not make that much difference.

Also, you probably won't get a lot of useful answers here, because there is a vocal group who think that you need a 3/4 ton truck to move raked leaves and a full ton to pull a 2H bumper pull.

CatOnLap
Nov. 30, 2009, 04:49 PM
which motor? which transmission? Which gearing ratios?

Last I checked, having the 4x4 actually decreased the maximum towing load due to the increased weight on the truck. (but made it easier to tow in difficult conditions)

I had the 5 L gas, overdrive auto tranny with transmission cooler, low gear ratios for towing and my F150 struggled up hills with a fully loaded 2H steel BP. We're talking pedal to the metal and only going 40 MPH up the mountain.

Maxed out at around 7500 lbs.

However, my dually 6 L diesel F350 does a really fine job of hauling raked leaves....together with my aluminum 3H GN fully loaded. Up the mountain, passing other vehicles at 60 mph.

You really can't have too much truck, and teh F350 gets the same fuel mileage as the F150 used to.

poltroon
Nov. 30, 2009, 04:51 PM
A 3 horse goose is going to be in the neighborhood of 8,000 lbs when loaded - and I'd be surprised if your 150 is rated for that. Indeed, most 150s aren't rated for a 3 horse bumper pull. Your truck will have a tow rating, which will tell you what it can do. Make sure that your hitch is rated for the weight as well as your truck.

4x4 does decrease your tow capacity a little, because it adds weight to the truck that comes off your GCVR. That said, if you're that close to the line, I'd have other worries like blowing out your transmission.

secretariat
Nov. 30, 2009, 05:23 PM
I've done it, no issue except truck wears out faster. Biggest issue is more weight to pull, harder on trans/engine/cooling. Nice thing about diesels in any of the trucks is tranny cooler. Gooseneck in and of itself is actually easier on the truck, pound for pound.

If you're going up in weight, look into an aftermarket transmission cooler and maybe even an aftermarket engine oil cooler. Cooler running = less wear = longer life.

RiverBendPol
Nov. 30, 2009, 06:17 PM
You might be able to go forward with that combo fairly well but God-forbid you need to jump on your brakes, that truck will not safely stop that loaded trailer. I think it is a HUGE risk. You're just looking for the right place to have an accident. I haul 2 horse GNs with F-350s and once in a while wonder if I need a bigger truck.
The 4x4 doesn't mean a thing to the towing unless you're in a muddy parking field. With out the 4x4 you will definitely need the tractor to pull you out. Well, actually, with an F-150 4x4 and a 3 horse GN you'll also need the tractor!

mroades
Nov. 30, 2009, 06:50 PM
no way no how would I do it

Simkie
Nov. 30, 2009, 07:50 PM
I agree with all the neigh-sayers.

I've ridden in a F-150 pulling a loaded 2 horse BP and it was downright terrifying when we headed down a hill. Not a chance I've even consider putting 3 horses behind a 150.

Bluey
Nov. 30, 2009, 08:08 PM
We have a plain cab, full bed 1990 4x4 F150 that has pulled our 16' gooseneck stocktrailer, with up to four horses or full of cattle, without any trouble, all these years, until we got a 2007 F150 4x4, crew cab, 6 1/2' bed, that we pull with now.
Both had the pulling package, that is heavy duty radiator, springs, etc.
We have hills, but not mountains and we do fine.

I would say that you can't ever have too much truck, so if you are going to pull long and far and always loaded heavily and big hills and mountains, if you have a choice, the larger truck always makes more sense.

tpup
Dec. 1, 2009, 05:58 AM
A new F150 with the larger engine would be capable (rated to tow over 10,000 lbs.) I would definitely be leary with an older one. I just bought a new Sierra rated to tow over 9,000 lbs but won't try anything more than a 2H bumper pull. BTW in most of the trucks I looked at, 4x4 reduced the tow capacity slightly, by 600-800 lbs or so but I'm not sure if that is only when it is engaged.

Guilherme
Dec. 1, 2009, 06:51 AM
Legally, you can probably pull a small GN with an F-150 (assuming the truck is properly equiped and the trailer is within the limits of the truck's stated capacity).

As many have noted pushing the limits in a half-ton is rolling the "safety" dice. In any game you'll win some, but eventually you'll "crap out." If that happens coming down a grade at full, gross weight the result will not be pretty.

Attempts at "management" (just doing short trips, staying on flat ground, keeping speed down, etc.) can help, but can't fully compensate for other drivers who can put the heavily laden half-ton into a serious emergency situation.

At the end of the day I'd likely not do it with anything more than a small, simple, light 2H trailer. And then I'd probably have my brakes redone every 25,000 miles.

G.

Equestryn
Dec. 1, 2009, 08:31 AM
This is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks!!

I think if I decide to get a GN trailer, I'll get a bigger truck. I can't really afford massive repair work at the moment (if I could, I'd have bought a bigger truck in the first place!) so I'll probably stick with a 2h bumper.

My truck is rated to pull 8,000. A 2 horse bumper w/ tack room loaded is about 5 or 6,000. That makes sense to me.

Thanks for all your input!!

Guilherme
Dec. 1, 2009, 09:48 AM
Just one quick thought: You can get small GN trailers that will weigh close to a BP unit. They'll usually be a couple of hundred pounds more due to the structure of the GN, but if the weight stays within limits (and that includes "tongue" weight) then you're OK.

I guess the biggest danger is that it's very easy to "overbuy" with a GN. Keep that in mind and you could "step up" if done carefully.

G.

poltroon
Dec. 1, 2009, 11:47 AM
A new F150 with the larger engine would be capable (rated to tow over 10,000 lbs.) I would definitely be leary with an older one. I just bought a new Sierra rated to tow over 9,000 lbs but won't try anything more than a 2H bumper pull. BTW in most of the trucks I looked at, 4x4 reduced the tow capacity slightly, by 600-800 lbs or so but I'm not sure if that is only when it is engaged.

The 4x4 reduces the tow capacity because of the added weight of the 4x4 components on the truck, so it doesn't matter if it is engaged or not.

poltroon
Dec. 1, 2009, 11:51 AM
When doing these calculations, in addition to the towing weight, the rule is to figure that 25% of the weight of the gooseneck will be carried on the gooseneck hitch, ie in the bed of the truck.

joiedevie99
Dec. 1, 2009, 12:16 PM
Call a Ford dealer and get them to email you the tow capacity chart for your vehicle year. They vary widely. I am looking at 2010's, and you can now get an F150 rated for over 9000 lbs. However, there are others that are in the 5k range. The chart for your year should list separate numbers for each base truck, cab, bed, rear differential, engine, etc. Then if you have the off road or towing packages the number changes again. On top of that, if your towing package isn't factory installed, but was installed later- you have to check whether you got additional cooling equipment installed. Honestly, some F150s can't even pull a 3H bumper pull safely- others could handle a 3H gooseneck no problem.

Fancy That
Dec. 2, 2009, 12:29 PM
No way. You never want to be "under trucked" You simply won't have any peace of mind....and I would consider it unsafe. Yes. People do it. Yes....the numbers may say you can.

BUT

I pull a 2.5 horse Gooseneck w/ my F250 XLT (long bed is best for GN too) and I thank my lucky stars I have the 460 big block engine, V8, 4WD and "beefiness" to handle our rig. I also want a bigger trailer someday and know my truck can handle it.

Glad you are thinking about this carefully. Go with a bigger truck for a bigger trailer!

Yip
Dec. 2, 2009, 04:08 PM
We have a 2002 F150 with the towing pkg. and bigger engine. I believe it is rated at 7700#, but got all the above info from hub, who may have ulterior motives. We won't go into debt for a different truck, so he may be handing me a line. Where do I look to see for myself?

We want to buy a 16-18" BP steel stock trailer and haul 1-2 horses (Never more than 2) and a cart or two at 150 & 200#. No hay, no water, just tack or harnesses. We live in foothills and could haul into both flat or hillier regions.

He is always asking me when we're going to order the trailer and the cost is not a problem. But *something* inside me keeps holding me back. Maybe a safety issue?

Yip

Firefilly
Dec. 2, 2009, 04:20 PM
Also, you probably won't get a lot of useful answers here, because there is a vocal group who think that you need a 3/4 ton truck to move raked leaves and a full ton to pull a 2H bumper pull.

LMAO!!!! Thanks for the giggle!!! Too funny :) :)

Firefilly
Dec. 2, 2009, 04:23 PM
I pull a 2.5 horse Gooseneck w/ my F250 XLT !



2.5 horse?????

Do you mean a 2 + 1 as we call them here???

Firefilly
Dec. 2, 2009, 04:27 PM
Which 150 did you buy? We owned one that was rated for 7700 lbs. I don't recall the specifics, but it was a rare duck- in the 5 yrs we owned it I saw only 1-2 others set up like it. I pulled a 3H GN aluminum trailer with tiny 4' short wall LQ. I never hauled 3 horses loaded to camp, just two. That maxed out what that truck could do.

I also have an F150 with the 7700 payload package. I don't think they make them anymore like that though. Mine is a 2003. Basically it is like a light duty 3/4 ton (which they also used to make many years ago).

I love my truck - however I do wish I went with a real F250 instead - but at the time when I bought this one, I couldn't afford the other - PLUS this came with zero percent financing... the F250 or F350 didn't. :(

appdream
Dec. 2, 2009, 11:08 PM
I have the 2003 F150 rated at 7700# and pull a two horse gooseneck. We did add an extra leaf to the rear suspension. Pulls great unless there is a hard hill to pull. SO is a retired truck driver and checked everything with the PA State Police, so the whole rig is 100% legal. But, there is no way I would pull a three horse.

katarine
Dec. 3, 2009, 10:06 AM
Yip, ours had a 7700 on the plastic, attached F150 'thingie' on the side of the bed of the truck...and on the one just fore of the doors of the truck- that plastic 'tag' attached to the truck itself.

http://www.f150online.com/forums/1997-2003-f-150/361810-01-7700-series.html

you may find this interesting...

Firefilly
Dec. 3, 2009, 10:37 AM
Yip, ours had a 7700 on the plastic, attached F150 'thingie' on the side of the bed of the truck...and on the one just fore of the doors of the truck- that plastic 'tag' attached to the truck itself.

http://www.f150online.com/forums/1997-2003-f-150/361810-01-7700-series.html

you may find this interesting...

Hey thanks for the link! I found that very interesting - and am even more happy with my truck purchase now :)

And yes, I will agree that it is a bit harder to find wheels, etc. after market for these 7700's .... but it's worth it :)

Yip
Dec. 3, 2009, 06:43 PM
The info on that site sounded really great so I was pretty sure that's the truck we have.

BUT here is what I found. It is in truth an F150- Triton V8 XLT Supercrew.

Hubby made our engine sound like the largest one they could put in the 150. So I searched F150 Triton V8 briefly and found this:


The name "Triton" is just a tag name that Ford uses. It has to do with the way the engine is manfactured (modular). Another feature that all Triton engines have in common is Fail-safe Cooling.

A fail-safe cooling system is designed to help protect the engine from potential damage due to a loss of coolant. If the engine overheats, it will automatically switch from 8-cylinder operation to alternating 4-cylinder operation. The vehicle will continue to operate, but with limited engine power. This system allows the driver to travel a short distance to obtain service or to reach a service facility if the engine overheats. The distance that can be traveled depends upon vehicle load, outside temperature and road conditions.


What is horsepower for Ford Triton V8?
1999-2003 is 260

Looks like it would not be a good tow vehicle, to me. Someone tell me if I'm wrong. For a 16-18 steel stock trailer, loaded with 1-2 horses and about 500# carts and tack.

Yip

ChocoMare
Dec. 3, 2009, 07:52 PM
Hauling all that in a steel trailer??? Nope. :no:

3/4 ton or full one ton ;)

katarine
Dec. 3, 2009, 09:02 PM
I would not feel at ease in that set up, Yip, I'm sorry to say.

My GN (empty- about 4400 lbs) with just two horses- now 6300 or so lbs, plus 30 gallons of water, our stuff, feed, hay, etc....pushed that 7700 lb rated pickup a time or two. Not a good feeling.

Are you pulling a GN or a BP?

take it to the dealer and ask THEM to help you translate your truck's info into hauling capacity. Then stop at a trusted mechanic's on the way home, and verify :)

Yip
Dec. 3, 2009, 11:11 PM
We don't have a trailer yet, just planned to order what we needed - last September. Since the bed is shorter than usual, we would buy a BP. How much difference would that make over GN? We have a factory towing pkg. and a WD hitch with equalizer bars.

The trailer would weigh 2800#, 1-2 horses @ 1K each, 1 cart for sure @ 200#, tack, harness, and a couple 5-gal. buckets of water.

Still sounds very under-trucked to me, and we won't do it now till we get a bigger truck. I've been holding off buying the trailer but hubby is ready to forge ahead. I left it up to him and I shouldn't have. He still doesn't seem to get it about carrying live large animals being different from towing a camping trailer.

He had been in a bad wreck last Christmas which totaled our Dodge Dakota, so we were desperate to replace the vehicle asap. We bought what we could afford to buy w/o borrowing.

Thanks, you guys.

Yip

TrotTrotPumpkn
Dec. 3, 2009, 11:27 PM
We don't have a trailer yet, just planned to order what we needed - last September. Since the bed is shorter than usual, we would buy a BP. How much difference would that make over GN? We have a factory towing pkg. and a WD hitch with equalizer bars.

The trailer would weigh 2800#, 1-2 horses @ 1K each, 1 cart for sure @ 200#, tack, harness, and a couple 5-gal. buckets of water.

Still sounds very under-trucked to me, and we won't do it now till we get a bigger truck. I've been holding off buying the trailer but hubby is ready to forge ahead. I left it up to him and I shouldn't have. He still doesn't seem to get it about carrying live large animals being different from towing a camping trailer.

He had been in a bad wreck last Christmas which totaled our Dodge Dakota, so we were desperate to replace the vehicle asap. We bought what we could afford to buy w/o borrowing.

Thanks, you guys.

Yip

Not a truck expert, but if I'm reading the new specs correctly you should be fine with that size of horses and a 2800 lb trailer if truck is rated for 7700 lbs with a tow package and equalizer hitch???

Sweet lord, I've towed one 1200 lb TB in a 2 horse Featherlite (anti-sway bar on the hitch) with tack room with a late model Chevy Tahoe. It towed just fine. Due to the electric brake I had no issues stopping--even on the highway. I'm not saying it was the ideal or that my palms weren't sweating (needed to get to the vet) so please don't chew my head off, but I can't believe that a 3/4 ton is the minimum everyone recommends for a 2 horse??

I would think your issue may be length of bed, length of trailer with bumper pull...looking forward to the comments.

fooler
Dec. 3, 2009, 11:47 PM
3/4 Ton is the bare minimum of truck. I know too many folks who bought the 1/2 ton truck and either paid numerous repair bills (usually transmission) or just upgraded to a heavier truck.

Have a friend who pulled a 2 Brender UP horse trailer with a Ford Ranger for years - including a trip from GA to MO. She had to replace the transmission to make the return trip from MO to GA. That was the first of at least 2 transmissions she put in the truck that I knew.

Like the tag line in an old commercial " You can pay me now or you can pay me later". Get the larger truck.

kellidahorsegirl
Dec. 4, 2009, 12:30 AM
Keep in mind that the towing capacity and pulling power isn't all you need to factor in to your equations on 'enough truck' for the trailer.

Towing capacity
Pulling power
STOPPING power
Weight and size of pickup in case the trailer wiggles/sways
SIZE of the trailer in question (along with GN or BP)

Of course, sure I think people can get by with a SMALL GN trailer on a 1/2 ton...but I wouldn't do it for the simple reason of being able to stop and/or control the rig in case of an emergency.

katarine
Dec. 4, 2009, 07:02 AM
Not a truck expert, but if I'm reading the new specs correctly you should be fine with that size of horses and a 2800 lb trailer if truck is rated for 7700 lbs with a tow package and equalizer hitch???

Sweet lord, I've towed one 1200 lb TB in a 2 horse Featherlite (anti-sway bar on the hitch) with tack room with a late model Chevy Tahoe. It towed just fine. Due to the electric brake I had no issues stopping--even on the highway. I'm not saying it was the ideal or that my palms weren't sweating (needed to get to the vet) so please don't chew my head off, but I can't believe that a 3/4 ton is the minimum everyone recommends for a 2 horse??

I would think your issue may be length of bed, length of trailer with bumper pull...looking forward to the comments.

Yip's truck is NOT rated for 7700 lbs. we don't know what it's rated for at this moment.

Bluey
Dec. 4, 2009, 07:36 AM
Well, I beg to differ, as our 1990 F150 4x4 has pulled our 16' steel gooseneck stocktrailer with up to four horses for now 20 years and has to have a break down yet, is still going strong, if getting so old that we bought another same truck, but 2007 model and that one is really a fancy one, for a pickup.;)

We used the 2007, F150 4x4 pickup with a three horse gooseneck slant with tack a few times for long trips.
One was a 12+ hour one day, back the next, long trip to pick up two horses and it pulled us fine all the way there and back.

Most locals hauling a few horses or cattle every day have both, 1/2 and 3/4 ton pickups and use whichever is handy, unless going to haul a loaded bigger trailer, like their 24' or 30' ones.

I think that you can have trouble with any pulling vehicle and it is not always because you were pulling too heavy a load.
I asked our local mechanic about getting the same 1/2 I had all these years, or go up to a 3/4 ton and he said either would work fine for our needs, he gets to work on both kinds about the same, no one breaks down any more than the other.

Now, bigger is always better, of course, if you need to do that much hauling.:)

PONYPULR
Dec. 4, 2009, 08:16 AM
No, no, no!! It's not about hauling capacity so much as weight and safety!!

monstrpony
Dec. 4, 2009, 02:30 PM
So, where, exactly, does one look up the "stopping power" of a potential towing vehicle? Everyone always says that the towing capacity and stopping power are two different considerations. It seems to me that assumes that the truck mfgr's never consider stopping when they determine "towing capacity"--as though getting the load moving is all that matters. Wouldn't that be opening themselves to lawsuits right and left? Doesn't it make sense that the stated towing capacity takes into consideration the braking ability of the vehicle? Plus, of course, whatever trailer brakes are required by law for the size of the particular load.

Granted, one would like to have their butt covered in the case of a catastrophic brake failure on the trailer, but either you're in the range where your vehicle can handle it in a single emergency, or you're toast anyway. Taking this "braking power" argument to the extreme, no one should haul much over three horses with anything less than an over-the-road tractor, yet we see 3h and larger, w/ LQ, towed by 3/4- or one-ton trucks all.the.time.

So, where is this elusive braking power tabulated for our reference?

(Disclaimer: I am in agreement that the older F-150, prior to the last major model change, is not adequate to tow the GN trailer in question)

TrotTrotPumpkn
Dec. 4, 2009, 02:39 PM
So, where, exactly, does one look up the "stopping power" of a potential towing vehicle? Everyone always says that the towing capacity and stopping power are two different considerations. It seems to me that assumes that the truck mfgr's never consider stopping when they determine "towing capacity"--as though getting the load moving is all that matters. Wouldn't that be opening themselves to lawsuits right and left? Doesn't it make sense that the stated towing capacity takes into consideration the braking ability of the vehicle? Plus, of course, whatever trailer brakes are required by law for the size of the particular load.

Granted, one would like to have their butt covered in the case of a catastrophic brake failure on the trailer, but either you're in the range where your vehicle can handle it in a single emergency, or you're toast anyway. Taking this "braking power" argument to the extreme, no one should haul much over three horses with anything less than an over-the-road tractor, yet we see 3h and larger, w/ LQ, towed by 3/4- or one-ton trucks all.the.time.

So, where is this elusive braking power tabulated for our reference?

(Disclaimer: I am in agreement that the older F-150, prior to the last major model change, is not adequate to tow the GN trailer in question)

This is exactly what I'm wondering. I just don't get it. Especially if you are towing on flat land/rolling hills. I assume stopping power must enter into the towing capacity calculation.

BTW, towed a steel gooseneck (not much bigger than the 2 horse BP with dressing room) w/a 3/4 ton Chevy. Only 1 TB on board. Electric brakes weren't working and honestly, if it had been two more horses (which the trailer can hold) on a hill, at over 55 mi per hour, I would have been screwed regardless. Actually I probably would have been screwed in an emergency stop with the single horse--there was no way to stop super quickly (poor truck brakes). But slow stops were totally fine.

By that reasoning a single horse needs a 1 ton to tow safely, because your e brakes might go out and you might need to make an emergency stop...

cowboymom
Dec. 4, 2009, 04:30 PM
Yip, ours had a 7700 on the plastic, attached F150 'thingie' on the side of the bed of the truck...and on the one just fore of the doors of the truck- that plastic 'tag' attached to the truck itself.

http://www.f150online.com/forums/1997-2003-f-150/361810-01-7700-series.html

you may find this interesting...

Here it's called a heavy half, as in half-ton. Heavier suspension comparable to a 3/4 ton and usually a towing set-up.

We used a heavy half with a BP four horse steel trailer for years but we CRAWLED up the mountain passes around here. The one and only time we were in a severe braking situation it held up (trailer brakes!) but I wouldn't want to do it again.

You can compare a heavy half with a 3/4 ton but you can save yourself a lot of label reading by just looking at 3/4 tons.

Fancy That
Dec. 4, 2009, 06:05 PM
2.5 horse?????

Do you mean a 2 + 1 as we call them here???

Sounds funny, but that's how the owner described her custom-made Turnbow Trailer when selling it to me.

It's "two and a half" because the "half" is meant for a foal or pony. Was made for hauling large broodmares and there are two dividers, but the last "stall" (the third one) is pretty small. It's perfect for a foal or pony though.

I just removed the last divider so now the last "stall" is super huge!

It's slant/stock combo.