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View Full Version : Coffee Lovers,need advice.



ctanner
Nov. 27, 2009, 07:36 AM
I need a new coffee maker.Coffee is one of the things I truly relish.I want a coffee maker that's not to pricey& makes an excellent hot cup of coffee.

I went online and tried to slog through the consumer reports,aahhh getting to the actual information was maddening.

So,what coffee maker do you Love or Hate and why.

Thanks Java Dogs!

Tanner

strawberry roan
Nov. 27, 2009, 07:41 AM
My mother swears by her Chemex. Me? I have an old Mr. Coffee. :)

tikidoc
Nov. 27, 2009, 07:50 AM
I have a French press style coffee maker. They are relatively cheap and make by far the best coffee I have ever had. I also have a cordless electric kettle, which is a very handy gadget for more than just making coffee. Heats up the water much faster that the stove or microwave.

This is a link to info on a French press from one of my favorite coffee places, Sweet Maria's, who sells all sorts of great stuff, including green beans from around the world (yes, I am a freak who roasts my own coffee). The Chambord French press they have there is about $40, but you can find other brands which work perfectly well for about $20.

http://www.sweetmarias.com/brewinstr/brewinstr.frenchpress.html

If you don't want to mess with the French press, Cook's Illustrated, my favorite geeky cooking magazine, reviewed inexpensive drip coffee makers and their favorite was Black & Decker SmartBrew 12-Cup Coffeemaker (model DCM2000). That was 2 years ago so the model number may have changed. They do extensive testing and analysis of darn near everything related to the kitchen, and I have found their advise to be sound.

Claddagh
Nov. 27, 2009, 08:04 AM
We have a Bunn coffee maker and LOVE it!

http://www.bunnomatic.com/retail/products/b.html

Makes great tasting coffee - and it's hot!

We've had it for about 5 years and it's still perfect. Just love it - worth every penny! Will definitely get another if this one ever dies. We've had several other brands of coffee makers over the years and this one beats them all - hands down! :yes:

kcmel
Nov. 27, 2009, 08:08 AM
Never liked the Bunn's. My parents always used them and I found they didn't extract the flavor from the coffee very well. They are fast; that's the only thing I can say about them. To get the best flavor a french press is the way to go.

Claddagh
Nov. 27, 2009, 08:17 AM
Never liked the Bunn's. My parents always used them and I found they didn't extract the flavor from the coffee very well. They are fast; that's the only thing I can say about them. To get the best flavor a french press is the way to go.

I guess it's really just a matter of personal taste. We got the Bunn because whenever we got coffee-to-go, or at a restaurant, nearly every single time that we loved the coffee, it had been made in a Bunn. So we decided to buy a home model and have been been enjoying that same great coffee flavor at home that we always enjoy when out. Plus the coffee is always HOT, unlike most of the Mr. Coffee type home brewers.

Made In Canada
Nov. 27, 2009, 08:25 AM
We have a Keurig and LOVE it!!

TikiSoo
Nov. 27, 2009, 08:28 AM
I have a Proctor Silex drip maker with a TIMER, easily the best coffee maker I've owned.

It heats the coffee to the optimum temperature, I think 190ยบ. If you don't get a high enough temperature, (like Mr Coffee) the coffee ends up weak.

It's been going strong for 11 years now and I make coffee at least every morning, so I'd say for the $25 or so I paid for it, it is a great value.

I love the timer setting so I can set it for 5am if I need to, and it's just finishing it's cycle when I get out of the shower. I used to use a light timer for the plug, but a built in is much nicer looking in my kitchen.

Coffee is best when it's fresh (why Dunkin Donuts is so popular, they toss their coffee after it's 20 minutes old) So buying 8'O Clock beans and only grinding a weeks worth and keeping the rest of the bag in the freezer will give you a fantastic pot every time.

I used to work for a coffee roaster and am somewhat a coffee snob.

mswillie
Nov. 27, 2009, 08:47 AM
I need a new coffee maker.Coffee is one of the things I truly relish.I want a coffee maker that's not to pricey& makes an excellent hot cup of coffee.

I went online and tried to slog through the consumer reports,aahhh getting to the actual information was maddening.

So,what coffee maker do you Love or Hate and why.

Thanks Java Dogs!

Tanner

This is not the most convenient coffee maker in the world. As a matter of fact it is sort of a pain to use. You have to keep an eye on it while it's brewing, no automatic start, and no warmer.

On the other hand it makes the best coffee I've ever had. Hands down.

http://www.bodumusa.com/shop/line.asp?MD=1&GID=3&LID=542&CHK=&SLT=&mscssid=SER6GTEQG6D88NJ21BGR42JPM7386TT1

About 10 years ago my BF and I got one and made a pot. We each took a sip. We then, without a word to each other, walked over to the Mr. Coffee, unplugged it and packed it for the attic. Far as I know it's still up there.

We've broken one pot in that time, they're surprisingly sturdy. We even take it with us on vacation. :yes:

We did replace the spring gizmo in the middle with an old Cory coffee rod. Makes it a little easier

Even if it's too much bother for an everyday pot (for us it's not) I'd recommend one for "company coffee" or for those nice relaxing after dinner cups. This thing even makes mediocre coffee taste good. It makes good coffee taste fantastic.

Cielo Azure
Nov. 27, 2009, 08:54 AM
Bodum, stainless steel thermal insulated 12-cup french press (ummm...that means four big cups).

Stainless steel, electric, cordless, water kettle (holding exactly the same amount of water) -which if you look, they seem to be made to go hand in hand. Water kettle turns off when water boils. just fill up, turn on. Water kettles are the must have in a kitchen.

It is SO easy and makes enough coffee to lasts two "real" drinkers all day.

I can't rave enough about how well this system works. No breaking parts, perfect coffee, hot for at least 45 minutes. No glass to break. It is portable, if you go camping or horse showing (with electric).

This system is beyond perfect!

For buying: Amazon (look for deals -I paid about half of the prices currenly listed or also ebay)
French Press:
http://www.amazon.com/Bodum-Columbia-Thermal-51-Ounce-Stainless-Steel/dp/B0000A8VUU/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1259330143&sr=8-3

Water kettle (this is a great one -again, avoid glass and plastic)
http://www.amazon.com/Chefs-Choice-685-International-Teakettle/dp/B0000667GV/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1259330215&sr=1-7

shall
Nov. 27, 2009, 09:12 AM
This one is pricey, but it saves me money by extracting the most from the beans. I went back to Chemex which is where I started with great coffee years ago, but I kept remembering the Capresso from my brothers and how great the caraffe was on that model, plus how much flavor there was from a lesser! amount of beans.

I've been using my expensive Capresso now for 3 years and still enjoy my coffee. Because of my well water, I run a cup of white vinegar and water through it every couple of months like this:

Fill well with water and 1 cup white vinegar, hit brew.
Empty the water, wait a bit, then brew clear water two more times.

This cleaning clears out the mineral deposits, and I'm expecting to keep this one for a long time.

Daydream Believer
Nov. 27, 2009, 09:28 AM
Just keep in mind that the best coffee maker in the world can't make low quality coffee taste good. I used to work for a major coffee manufacturer and trust me...there is good coffee (always Arabica), mediocre coffee (older or lower grade Arabicas) and down right bitter and vile coffee (Robustas...generally Vietnam in origin). Anyway, nearly all coffee is made of blends of the above and the flavor profile is kept the same by blending the different types and grades of coffees. To keep down costs, they will use as much Robustas as they can and as little of the high quality Arabica's. Examples of these blends are the Folgers, Maxwell Houses, Hills, etc...

Unless you are into the higher end 100% Arabica's or one type of bean like Colombian's or other "Origins" or Fair Trade Coffees the taste can be bitter and not so acidic. The more acidic the taste, generally the better the coffee. The plant I worked at manufactured the Dunkin' Donuts line for a while and it is good quality coffee all the way to the beans and blend so there is no wonder that the taste is exceptional...it is GOOD coffee from the beans up. In the same plant we made Chase and Sanborn which is 100% Robustas and will grow hair on your chest. No coffee maker can make C&S taste "good!"

Best coffee I've ever had was from Costa Rica Tres Rios...incredibly good. I worked right beside the lab that tasted the coffee before and after production and one benefit was that they made some damn fine coffee for us employees to drink all day. It totally ruined me from drinking the major brands blends which all contain Robustas. Once you taste the Robustas and then taste a good Arabica, you will never forget the difference.

Lady Counselor
Nov. 27, 2009, 09:41 AM
Mmmm...I love Costa Rican La Minta...from our local roasters (www.ibuycoffee.com)
My vote is for using a pot with a stainless steel carafe. Stays hot, doesn't burn, lesser risk of being a fire hazard. I am currently using a Cuisinart pot, but many manufacturers make them. Best of all, the timer that I can set so the coffee is done and ready when I get downstairs in the morning. :)

Little Indian
Nov. 27, 2009, 09:48 AM
the Kurig. I never thought I would say it, I am a total convert. I have yet to have a bad cup of coffee from the machine.

Liberty
Nov. 27, 2009, 09:50 AM
I just recently bought this one and love it:
http://www.target.com/Michael-Graves-Design-Automatic-Coffeemaker/dp/B000FVU4A0

Super easy to use; programming is a snap, and it makes great coffee (has a "flavor booster" button if you like your coffee a little stronger).

After years of $20 cheapies, I figured I'd splurge on a $45 "designer" model. :lol:

4Martini
Nov. 27, 2009, 10:07 AM
I have a black and decker one that makes the coffee directly into the mug. I love it- have had it for 12 years and just had a problem and might have to replace it. I love that there is no pot to clean up. It has a wire basket in it- so no filters to buy either. It is so low maintenace. Coffee always tastes great. One cup a day is all I need and all I get! It comes with two thermal mugs too so you get one hot cup of coffee ready to go.

I also have a cuisinart one that my parents bought me after getting sick of waiting for each cup to brew separately when they came over. It works great- but sits in the closet until they come over.

HCF
Nov. 27, 2009, 10:29 AM
We have a Keurig and LOVE it!!

Glad to hear. Its on my Christmas list!! :)

JER
Nov. 27, 2009, 11:27 AM
mswillie, you're right about the vacuum/siphon pot -- they're fantastic. We have a Hario siphon with the alcohol burner (http://www.harioglass.com/english/products/taste/syphon.htm) just to be extra coffee-geekish.

For daily use, I have a collection of Bodum presses. I like making a single cup at a time for optimum taste.

And like others have said, you have to start with good beans.

(I used to work for a coffee roaster. I can go on about all things coffee for hours.)

caffeinated
Nov. 27, 2009, 11:38 AM
I have a Braun I really like. Simple, no programming, etc. Just turn it on and go. But it's got a great insulated pot that keeps the coffee nice and toasty even long after the heat goes off. Not that I usually let it sit that long, but still :)

Alagirl
Nov. 27, 2009, 11:42 AM
We have a Keurig and LOVE it!!


^_^ just pick your model wisely! Big differences in tank size and cup size...

I got a handmydown, love it for when I really need only one cup (should be most of the time) the available coffee selection is great (but buy online or at walmart, BB&B is HIGH!!!) you can get chocolate and tea as well, as well as an insert (sold separately) where you can fill in your own coffee.


My favorite coffee maker became useless when the carafe broke, so I replaced with cheapest possible non white machine...but then I am not a gourmet type coffee drinker.

I liked Chase and Sandborn, I drink maxwel house....(but Newman's own is yummie, a but robust but yummie)

ctanner
Nov. 27, 2009, 12:13 PM
Thanks everybody!
I always use high quality coffee.I'm currently buying coffee from Counter Culture in NC.I always grind my beans for each pot and I have been doing so since 1980.
Thanks for the links,you guys are pros at giving good and useful advice.
Next Off Topic Day I'll let you know what I get.At the moment I'm leaning towards a thermal carafe.:yes:

sunhawk
Nov. 27, 2009, 12:23 PM
stainless steel french press, three sisters kicking horse coffee, grind a little course, it pushes down better, and preheat the pot

LuckyStar
Nov. 27, 2009, 01:21 PM
When we moved to our new place about a month ago, hubby bought and installed me the coolest ever coffee maker. It's a Black and Decker space maker. It hangs from the bottom of the upper cabinets. Makes great coffee and leaves my counter free. It has a few fancy features that I don't use... they apparently also have a whole line of these space saver appliances.

Love my coffee!

Jevalia's (sp?) are also pretty nice. If you join the club and buy some coffee (excellent coffee!) they send it to you free!:D

Louise
Nov. 27, 2009, 02:30 PM
I've never been a coffee drinker. It all tasted the same, weak and dishwatery.

Then, the company I work for installed Keurigs throughout the building. Since I just have to try anything new, I tried a cup. Now I drink two or three cups a day. And, I bought a Keurig for home, as well.

Wonderful coffee, in any variety that you want (I like it dark and bold). The cocoa, now, that's not so hot.

mswillie
Nov. 27, 2009, 02:44 PM
mswillie, you're right about the vacuum/siphon pot -- they're fantastic. We have a Hario siphon with the alcohol burner (http://www.harioglass.com/english/products/taste/syphon.htm) just to be extra coffee-geekish.

For daily use, I have a collection of Bodum presses. I like making a single cup at a time for optimum taste.

And like others have said, you have to start with good beans.

(I used to work for a coffee roaster. I can go on about all things coffee for hours.)

That Hario looks interesting. I like the alcohol burner geek-factor. :) I really think it's the vacuum /siphon method that makes such good coffee. We have a commercial BUN and a Keurig at work. Both make decent coffee but I simply haven't found anything that can hold a candle to the siphon type pot.

One thing no one has mentioned yet is the water. I think that's as important as the beans and the method. The water straight out of my well is hard and has quite a bit of iron in it. When I installed a water softener I found that the coffee was much smoother and rich flavored and there was much less "tangy" (for lack of a better word) flavor.

Even if you didn't need a whole house type filter an under the sink type would be a worthwhile investment if you want the absolute best coffee.

Bogie
Nov. 27, 2009, 02:54 PM
Very true.

I actually use an espresso machine -- it's a Rancillio Sylvia, but it's the coffee that makes the difference.

I started researching coffees through www.coffeereview.com and from there started ordering from different "micro roasters". I tried several before I found one I liked. For several years I ordered from Paradise Roasters . . . only changed because I wanted to support local businesses and get a slightly fresher product.

I'm lucky enough to live very close to George Howell, one of the great roasters in Boston and he gave me a private tasting of his coffees when i stopped in one day.

I now buy coffee from a roaster in the Boston area (Atomic Cafe) since it's roasted to order and shipped the same day.

My husband and I have fun trying the different coffees as it's one of the luxuries in our life that's still mostly affordable!
Just keep in mind that the best coffee maker in the world can't make low quality coffee taste good. I used to work for a major coffee manufacturer and trust me...there is good coffee (always Arabica), mediocre coffee (older or lower grade Arabicas) and down right bitter and vile coffee (Robustas...generally Vietnam in origin). Anyway, nearly all coffee is made of blends of the above and the flavor profile is kept the same by blending the different types and grades of coffees. To keep down costs, they will use as much Robustas as they can and as little of the high quality Arabica's. Examples of these blends are the Folgers, Maxwell Houses, Hills, etc...

Unless you are into the higher end 100% Arabica's or one type of bean like Colombian's or other "Origins" or Fair Trade Coffees the taste can be bitter and not so acidic. The more acidic the taste, generally the better the coffee. The plant I worked at manufactured the Dunkin' Donuts line for a while and it is good quality coffee all the way to the beans and blend so there is no wonder that the taste is exceptional...it is GOOD coffee from the beans up. In the same plant we made Chase and Sanborn which is 100% Robustas and will grow hair on your chest. No coffee maker can make C&S taste "good!"

Best coffee I've ever had was from Costa Rica Tres Rios...incredibly good. I worked right beside the lab that tasted the coffee before and after production and one benefit was that they made some damn fine coffee for us employees to drink all day. It totally ruined me from drinking the major brands blends which all contain Robustas. Once you taste the Robustas and then taste a good Arabica, you will never forget the difference.