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M.K.Smith
Nov. 27, 2009, 12:10 AM
I'm trying to cut down on my heating costs. I have oil heat. I'm looking for something economical that can be used to heat my master bedroom 12' x 15'4". My son has an oil filled radiator that works well for his room, but didn't seem effective the one time that I tried it in mine. Any suggestions- primarily it must be cost effective and work well and be safe around toddlers.

I'm also trying to find an economical heater that would work in the garage to keep my washing machine from freezing. Long story short... when husband was ill and we needed a shower downstairs, so the washing machine was moved to the garage. It was promised that it would get moved it to the basement when it got cold. And now my phone calls don't get returned. So... I don't want our pricey front loading washing machine to freeze. I don't need the whole garage to be heated, but I need to know without a doubt that the washing machine won't freeze. Our lowest temps are usually single digits, but that rarely happens. The heater also has to be very safe since I often won't be home when it is running.

4Martini
Nov. 27, 2009, 12:27 AM
Oh- I'm curious about this too. We have a guest room in our basement that I would like to get a heater for so it's not miserable for our family when they come into town for Christmas!

greysandbays
Nov. 27, 2009, 12:28 AM
I've seen these little fake electric fireplaces (look like they have real log and flame and everything!) that have wheels and can be rolled from one room to another as you wish. I saw them on sale somewhere for under $100 and they claim to be a very good "take the chill off a room" device.

I also get mailing promos once in a while for some kind of infrared (?) heater that is supposed to be "not hot" to the touch that makes all sorts of outlandish claims (which might or might not be true) about how wonderful and efficient they are.

M.K.Smith
Nov. 27, 2009, 12:42 AM
One of the problems that I've had is I can't figure out how much electricity the heaters use. I went to our local hardware store and they had no clue either. I certainly don't want to drive up my bill by having something that sucks electricity!!!

greysandbays
Nov. 27, 2009, 01:06 AM
One of the problems that I've had is I can't figure out how much electricity the heaters use. I went to our local hardware store and they had no clue either. I certainly don't want to drive up my bill by having something that sucks electricity!!!

I think the one I was looking at that I liked was 1500 watts. IIRC, they had another (that for some reason didn't float my boat) might have been 1200~.

But don't quote me on that!

We have a couple of butt-ugly but very stable, non-tipping utility-type space heaters that had two heat settings: high at 1500, and low at 750.

Plumcreek
Nov. 27, 2009, 01:48 AM
I have one of those small oil filled old fashioned radiator-looking electric heaters on wheels. I use it to heat my tack room for the cats (who earned it by eliminating mice from the barn). The lowest of 3 settings is 500 Watts and I set the temp at about 25% of max on that low setting. The heater gets almost too hot to keep a hand against and keeps the room nice and warm (but takes awhile to heat initially).

I would wrap your washing machine with heat tape, maybe cover with tarp as well during cold snaps.

Robin@DHH
Nov. 27, 2009, 11:32 AM
No suggestions on cheap heat, but you could consider
hiring a couple of strong backs and an appliance hand
truck and have them move the washer to the basement.
It shouldn't be too hard to find some out of work
construction workers or strapping high school/college
kids who would like some cash for the job.

To figure out how much it will cost to run a heater,
take the watt rating and multiply by the number of
hours it will run. Divide by 1000 and you have the
number of kilowatt hours that will be added to your
electric bill.

JanM
Nov. 27, 2009, 11:41 AM
Call the nearest appliance or moving store-they will send a guy or two with a dolly, move the appliances to the basement and hook them back up. Or if there is local appliance repair they can move them for you and it will take about 10 minutes and cost less than a broken water line.

I think the Amish fireplaces they advertise on tv do a good job, cost about $400, and are very safe and portable, but I don't know operating costs. I bet Consumer Reports would have a rating with operating costs. If you can't find an online CR rating then go to the nearest library, almost every library carries CR.