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tallygirl
Nov. 26, 2009, 06:09 PM
So i am just curious. what do most people pay for full training and what does it include? ther have been some things come up at our barn where some people are unhappy with the pricing of full training. I am not a trainer im a boarder and am in half training because i work a lot. Anyways. When i used to be in full training at a different barn i would normally pay around 500 but this was for a big known trainer and was an A barn. Our barn is not an A barn and my trainer just started really training. riding all her life but really getting into serious training kids, adults, etc. Im just curious what people pay so i can see if our rates are comparable. What do you guys pay for A barn training or what do you pay for a non A barn and more low key like mine. Also im in california so if i could get some of you california people to let me know what you pay that would be great! thanks!!:D

vbunny
Nov. 26, 2009, 07:55 PM
I think it depends on what you get, the facility, the quality and also, what the trainer wants to make. If she lets people know her charges up front and you think what she makes is unfair, then move. Personally I don't think that $500/month for full training/care (for me that would be 5-6 days a week) is much as all.

tallygirl
Nov. 26, 2009, 08:52 PM
i used to pay 500 at an A barn. that isnt much at all for being at an A barn, i was really pleased. if you actually read the post im not even in full training, half training. im just wondering on behalf of people at my barn. i am not looking to "move" because I am satisfied. you dont need to be all snappy. all i asked is what people paid for full training, funny thing is, you posted but didnt even answer the question. LOL.

Lucassb
Nov. 26, 2009, 09:32 PM
Boarding and training costs vary *enormously* by location, (and by how you define an "A show barn.") In my area of the northeast, full training in a barn run by a BNT will easily run $2500-3k per month.

At my current barn, that includes pretty much everything except vet & farrier costs. They do all the usual feed/muck/blanket/turnout. Grooming and tacking/untacking are included (although I prefer to do my own, which drives my groom a little nuts.) They do all the laundry, saddle pads etc. The price also includes lessons and pro rides on whatever schedule suits the horse and rider; most riders will lesson two or three times a week, depending on their show schedule.

There are also a wide range of trainers who do the local A shows - Fairfield, Old Salem, Westbrook, etc - but who are not BNTs. Their programs run anywhere from $1200 - $1800 or so depending on what is included, and they might or might not offer "full training." More likely, they'd offer lesson packages rather than the whole full service/full training type of arrangement. You might be able to find a decent backyard boarding situation for $500, but the amenities would likely be pretty limited.

However, if you drove 40-45 minutes north or west, you'd probably be able to cut those prices significantly, maybe in half. Many of the folks who board up in those areas often show at the same "A show" venues ... so again, it depends on where you are and how you apply those definitions.

indygirl2560
Nov. 26, 2009, 10:16 PM
I'm in Cali and my old barn(an A show barn) charged $700/month for full training, which includes exercising/lessons/riding 5 days a week, and $430-$500 board/month(depending on whether you had your horse in a stall or pipe stall) on top of that. My current barn charges $550/month for board, but I don't know about the full training rates. What part of California is your barn in?

Blue Star
Nov. 26, 2009, 10:22 PM
I have been in three different active "A" show barns in SoCal...full training and board and grooming came to about $1300 - 1400 per month....:yes:

tallygirl
Nov. 26, 2009, 10:48 PM
thanks guys so much for your inputs!! really appreciate it!! what would you think is a fair rate for a trainer ( good trainer though ) but that has just started her training career in the last year? is not a BNT. just pretty basic right now and not going to any A shows. thanks!

Mac123
Nov. 27, 2009, 12:13 AM
tallygirl....the best way to figure this is some simple math...

What's the trainer's lesson rate? What's the training ride rate?

Compute what 3 rides and 2 lessons / week would come to at a la carte prices, multiply by four, and apply a 10-15% discount.

Regardless of experience, full training is simply not worth it for the trainer at anything less than about $500 per month. At $400/mo, for example, that's $100 per week, covering either 2 $50 lessons or maybe 3 $30 training rides - not anything near full training.

It may seem "expensive" when all lumped together, but really, it's not cost effective if the trainer isn't making close to what the normal price of services should be.

Find the normal price of services, compute the package, and you will have a fair estimate.

I don't care if the trainer has been in business a week or 20 years. Is she GOOD and effective? You should be willing to pay for the value this trainer can deliver to you. Cheap services usually = cheap value...

A new trainer's costs are the same as an old trainer's costs, only the older trainer can charge more based on the *perception* of their inherent betterness, which isn't always true....

Tex Mex
Nov. 27, 2009, 12:17 AM
It usually depends on the groom situation more than the A show issue. For example, if the trainer has 10 horses, they need at least 2 grooms. But if they have more than that, they have to hire more grooms. So if they have top guys working for them, that is $$$. Many of the A barns in socal (not just BNTs) charge $1,000 to $1,800 for training (which includes grooming, but not board). This usually includes as many lessons and training rides as you need, and hopefully for that price you also get top guys caring for your horse.

two sticks
Nov. 27, 2009, 12:45 AM
Nevermind- obv my answers are not what the OP wants to hear.

I will just leave this part of my first post: AROUND HERE full training ranges from 275-450 for "not an A barn" to 500-750+ at an "A" barn.

two sticks
Nov. 27, 2009, 01:31 AM
Nevermind- obv my answers are not what the OP wants to hear.

two sticks
Nov. 27, 2009, 01:52 AM
Nevermind- obv my answers are not what the OP wants to hear.

findeight
Nov. 27, 2009, 10:49 AM
... if you actually read the post im not even in full training, half training... i am not looking to "move" because I am satisfied. you dont need to be all snappy. all i asked is what people paid for full training, funny thing is, you posted but didnt even answer the question. LOL.

well with your puctuation and grammer. it is hard to read, your post.

And your question is impossible to answer. Full training with who? Where, what kind of facility? What do you mean "full" training? What's included? What is not? How many lessons a week? How many Pro rides? What about show fees? Included or not? Is there an assistant at home when trainer os at shows? If not, do you still have to pay the "full" training rate?

There is no such thing as a standard definition of "full" training.

Provide more specifics about your definition of 'full" training and you might get more specific answers then anything from 500 to 3500 a month.

LeeB10
Nov. 27, 2009, 10:59 AM
What do you guys pay for A barn training or what do you pay for a non A barn and more low key like mine. Also im in california so if i could get some of you california people to let me know what you pay that would be great! thanks


It depends on where in California you reside. If it is in the Sacramento area it will be less expensive than on the penisula so that is as big a part of the equation as the "A" trainer who is new. It also depends on the new trainers experience as a rider - can she ride your horse in a grand prix or is she only able to show at 3 feet. Is she a hunter rider or does she do jumpers or does she not ride at all. Even on the B circuit there are basic costs for a trainer to run a business. Can the boarders actually leave and go find another trainer cheaper? You can search websites of trainers for basic prices in your area and what they offer - that would be where I would start if I had questions regarding costs.

LeeB10
Nov. 27, 2009, 11:00 AM
peninsula.. am just on my first cup of coffee :)

jse
Nov. 27, 2009, 11:10 AM
It is definitely going to vary amongst the who, what, when and wheres.
But I agree with whoever said, if the trainer is GOOD you should be willing to pay whatever it may cost within your means.

Sunny's Mom
Nov. 27, 2009, 01:05 PM
In Colorado, my old trainer was 400/month plus $45 for lessons (on top of the 400). So it worked out to be about $625 if I took one lesson a week. A lot of weeks (show season) I took 2 lessons per week, so that worked out to be about $760/month. My trainer has gone to the east coast to ride, so I'm probably going to use another trainer in the spring. She's 600/month and I think that is 20 contacts that can be lessons or riding.