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View Full Version : Getting a second dog-do you need to think about gender?



IFG
Nov. 25, 2009, 08:55 PM
We have a 14 month old fixed male standard poodle. Our twins will be going to college next year, and we are starting to think about getting another dog for company for him when we are out.

He is friendly with almost all other dogs, though he recently seems to take offense to very dominant other large male dogs. Most he is fine with, and he will never start a fight, but he will finish it.

So as we start to think about another dog, should we stay away from other males? It seems that more dogs on Petfinder are male than female, so it will be harder to get a female.

Any thoughts on how to ensure a peaceful household?

SarEQ
Nov. 25, 2009, 09:04 PM
In my experience it's more about personality than if the dog is male or female.

I've known males that only get along with males, and males that only get along with females... same goes for females. I expect all my dogs to be polite and mannerly with other dogs, even if the other dog is acting up. My dog doesn't have to be playful or friendly, but it is expected that they won't fight or cause issues.

If your male dog seems to dislike some types of male dogs, avoid those dogs. Or start searching for a female, if he gets along with all females. No matter what, there will be a settling in period and some dogs are more accepting than others. Take your dog into account... if you pick a male dog, pick a laid back, smaller male dog, or one that's more submissive.

TKR
Nov. 25, 2009, 10:40 PM
I would think hard about a female. My male GSD won't tolerate another male dog on the farm (other than the little Yorkie in the house who is neutered and he is not convinced he's actually another dog, lol).My farrier had a mature Bull Mastiff who almost killed a Redbone Hound he brought in -- not much more than a puppy, but another male. If he shows aggression or is territorial or possessive it would be much easier to just get a female and have her spayed. My male GSD is great with our female Border Collie, who actually bosses him around. JMHO! Good luck.
PennyG

Go Fish
Nov. 25, 2009, 11:23 PM
I think the breed of dog can make a difference. My Corgi bitches have always been more aggressive than the males, without exception, and I've had them for 40 years.

That being said, if your dog is showing a propensity to fight, I would question adding another dog to the household, particularly if you are gone from the house frequently and are not there to supervise.

jetsmom
Nov. 25, 2009, 11:36 PM
I've had neutered males, spayed females, and 2 of each at the same time. It depends on the dog, but you would most likely be best with a spayed female. Second choice would be a submissive male that is over 18 months old. The personality is more "set" by then.

MunchkinsMom
Nov. 25, 2009, 11:49 PM
In my experience it's more about personality than if the dog is male or female.

I've known males that only get along with males, and males that only get along with females... same goes for females. I expect all my dogs to be polite and mannerly with other dogs, even if the other dog is acting up. My dog doesn't have to be playful or friendly, but it is expected that they won't fight or cause issues.

If your male dog seems to dislike some types of male dogs, avoid those dogs. Or start searching for a female, if he gets along with all females. No matter what, there will be a settling in period and some dogs are more accepting than others. Take your dog into account... if you pick a male dog, pick a laid back, smaller male dog, or one that's more submissive.

I agree with this post, it depends more on the temperment of both dogs.

JanM
Nov. 26, 2009, 09:08 AM
No matter what you do (and I would go with a submissive female/spayed) I hope you have central air or good soundproofing. When I got the male Miniature Schnauzer (unneutered-got that done ASAP) he and the much older spayed female got on fine, but I made it clear to him that it was her house. She slept on the bed & he slept on the floor, she got fed first and him second (with total supervision), and they did very well. BUT I fortunately had central air-that way when he tried his hump the female routine (dominance humping) the neighbors didn't hear me yelling at him "Stop Humping Your SIster You Little B#*$&#$". He only tried this a few times, and the disgusted look on her face was really funny, and she did snarl at him when he tried too. He didn't move up in the pecking order until I put Mindy to sleep at a very advanced age. Maybe you can find a dog that you can try introducing them first, off your property so you can guage the interaction. Don't forget an animal at a shelter may be very different at your home. My dog didn't bark once at the shelter when the dogs around him were going nuts-but he certainly barks at his house when he needs too (there's some dispute about needs between him and me-I don't worry about the mail truck, but he does).

wendy
Nov. 26, 2009, 10:07 AM
The situation where you are most likely to have problems is with two females of approximately the same age. If I were you I would look for a female that was quite a bit younger than your male, just to stack the decks in favor of not having problems.