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Oldenburg Mom
Nov. 24, 2009, 02:28 PM
Which one(s) of you out there are expert(s) ... beside Tom King (of course.)

I have HAD it with the ground hogs, that are now so entrenched under my barn ... well, I don't know what to do. I'm seriously considering buying a bazooka, sticking it down one of their numerous holes (where they live) and pulling the proverbial trigger.

Ok, I am kidding.

But I really should learn to shoot. My BIL, who used to ranch in Montana, recommended a 22 Magnum. Whatever that is. Plus, I really want to be prepared in case any of the wild dogs that live around here start to pester the horses.

What do the rest of you CoTHers do ... ? Can you shoot? Let me know what you'd recommend...and yes, I do know this is NOT going to be a 5-minute exercise. It's going to take a lot of time to learn to shoot correctly and accurately.

mjrtango93
Nov. 24, 2009, 02:39 PM
Do you have a gun club or shooting range around that you could go to and get some shooting practice in and try different guns? That would probably be the best thing if you know nothing. They can teach you gun safety, teach you how to shoot, and you can try out several guns to see what you are most comfortable with.

twofatponies
Nov. 24, 2009, 03:27 PM
I took the state run hunter's safety class - it's free, and was run by two really good guys, both of whom offered follow-up lessons at the local gun club for anyone interested. 80% of the participants had been shooting all their lives and just needed to qualify for hunting licenses. The rest of us were newbies.

The first day was a bunch of demonstrations and videos, and the second day we all got to try shooting down on the club range. I envied the little boys who knocked down every target, while I shot randomly out over the swamp, hitting nothing.

It was a good overview, and gets you a license. Then you can follow up with practice with one of the instructors... or your uncle, or whoever.

Oldenburg Mom
Nov. 24, 2009, 03:30 PM
hey, mjrtango93. Thanks for replying.

Well, there's one that I pass on my home from work on Saturday. I went in there last week ... there were about 50 ... uhh ... guys there, all dressed in camo. Talk about feeling out of place ... it was pretty, umm pretty much like WalMart on a sales day, if you get my drift.

They do have a shooting range ... that was actively being used ... fairly deafening, as a matter of fact. Of couse, I wasn't looking for the Ralph Lauren of gun shops, ... but maybe something a little LESS hysterical?

Do you shoot? If so, how did you get started ???

Oldenburg Mom
Nov. 24, 2009, 03:32 PM
I took the state run hunter's safety class -

That's a great idea. I wonder if I need a license to shoot on my own property the mini-bears (aka groundhogs). I'll check out the info for VA.

THANKS!

twofatponies
Nov. 24, 2009, 03:34 PM
OM - the scene at the club might be intimidating, but smile and be charming, and you'll find a good number of guys who know a lot and are happy to help. :D

There ARE the Ralph Lauren gun clubs, too, but do you really want/need to pay $300 an hour and have someone wipe your boots on the way in the door?

LilyandBaron
Nov. 24, 2009, 03:35 PM
Definitely contact a local gun club that offers the class for hunting licenses. I've done some competition shooting, and gun people are so awesome - they truly love the sport and are excited when others want to participate. I got help from some highly qualified champion shooters, and had a blast - pun intended. For the ground hog holes, have you tried removing them? I love shooting, but hate killing, yet if they are going to break a horse's leg or hurt someone, I will. I've also known folks to drop smoke bombs in the hole, and then see where it comes out and have folks help shovel manure over the hole to trap them inside:( Also, a good gun store can help you decide on the best gun for you, and the best ammo - you want to be able to kill the bad critters without the bullet going through them and hitting something else!

danceronice
Nov. 24, 2009, 03:35 PM
You PROBABLY don't (around here at least they're 'vamints') but definitely check, and find out about a hunter-safety course.

For pest control, my dad uses a .22 long rifle for distance shots and a .22 target pistol for killing animals in a live trap (mostly raccoons and possums). I wouldn't get anything bigger caliber. Hand or long gun depends on regulations where you live and what you're more comfortable with--I've always had an easier time sighting with handguns, for example.

mjrtango93
Nov. 24, 2009, 03:53 PM
hey, mjrtango93. Thanks for replying.

Well, there's one that I pass on my home from work on Saturday. I went in there last week ... there were about 50 ... uhh ... guys there, all dressed in camo. Talk about feeling out of place ... it was pretty, umm pretty much like WalMart on a sales day, if you get my drift.

They do have a shooting range ... that was actively being used ... fairly deafening, as a matter of fact. Of couse, I wasn't looking for the Ralph Lauren of gun shops, ... but maybe something a little LESS hysterical?

Do you shoot? If so, how did you get started ???

I used to shoot, but not anymore. I live in the burbs, and just don't have a need. I actually got started when I was about 8 with my grandfather. He thought every child should know about guns and gun safety and be able to hit something should the need arise. He actually took me to the gun club he was part of and I took a couple courses through them, plus shooting time with gramps and one of the instructors. I was a pretty damn good shot then too! I was always told your ability to hit your target was directly related to how comfortable you were with your firearm, hence trying out several before you buy one. Even as a kid a was an ace with a rifle which they all said should have been to much for me, go figure. Can honestly say I haven't actually fired a gun in well over 8 years now though, but pretty sure I could if need be.

Gun clubs can be intimidating (and yes very loud, bring ear plugs it helps), but just go to the registration desk and speak with them. The couple gun clubs I have gone to have been incredibly nice and informative, and none were the Ralph Lauren type (but I must say better then Walmart on sale days). You may just want to find a slightly different club, or actually wait until hunting season is more underway. Bet you had a lot of hunters there getting ready for the season to begin and it will quite down once they can get out of the club.

Oldenburg Mom
Nov. 24, 2009, 03:53 PM
Just made my first call. Apparently the classes are declining ... probably because of the season? Ok. I can cope with that. One of the volunteer leaders will call me later today to explain more.

I do know one rule is NO SHOOTING ON SUNDAY. Even "varmits", danceronice!

OMGiH! There ARE RL gun clubs!!! Go figure ... who'd a thunk it. I was just being a smart alec!

Ok, now I'm going to search for "gun clubs" and see what I come up with. Thanks everybody!!! You're a lot of help!

Well, I looked at three clubs that were fairly close.

1st one ... handguns.
2nd one ... no educational series ... but lots of social stuff! Oh, and skeet shooting.
3rd one ... Uhhhhh, not interested in learning about TEACHING, ... or automatic weapons, or concealed handguns.

This is a leetle more explosive than I want! :lol:

mjrtango93
Nov. 24, 2009, 04:02 PM
I forgot to mention do you have a police academy or sheriff training around you? We live across the highway from the local police academy and they even do classes for the public there that might be slightly less intimidating (well if you are ok being surrounded by cops). I think they do gun safety classes, and I know they have a couple hours a week for the public to shoot.

Oldenburg Mom
Nov. 24, 2009, 04:18 PM
I forgot to mention do you have a police academy or sheriff training around you?


Well, brrrrrrrr. I went to the sheriff site for my county...got distracted by all the ***offenders living nearby. That's enough to scare the bejesus out of you!!

Anyway, I'll try calling when I get home.

JSwan
Nov. 24, 2009, 04:33 PM
That's a great idea. I wonder if I need a license to shoot on my own property the mini-bears (aka groundhogs). I'll check out the info for VA.

THANKS!


You do not need a license to hunt on your OWN property in Virginia.

PM me your location (county is fine) and I'll try and help you locate a good firing range. If you feel nervous or uncomfortable about being a "newbie", if you're close by I'd be happy to meet you at the range.

Also, in addition to taking the hunter safety education course (anyone can take it not just hunters), you can take on-line courses free here:

http://www.ihea.com/

It's designed for hunters - but anyone can benefit and learn something about safety in the woods - not just firearm/hunting safety.

Hope that helps. :)

Miss J
Nov. 24, 2009, 04:39 PM
hey, mjrtango93. Thanks for replying.

Well, there's one that I pass on my home from work on Saturday. I went in there last week ... there were about 50 ... uhh ... guys there, all dressed in camo. Talk about feeling out of place ... it was pretty, umm pretty much like WalMart on a sales day, if you get my drift.

They do have a shooting range ... that was actively being used ... fairly deafening, as a matter of fact. Of couse, I wasn't looking for the Ralph Lauren of gun shops, ... but maybe something a little LESS hysterical?

Do you shoot? If so, how did you get started ???
Trust me, guys like that love to teach people about firearms! very helpful! Def get a safety course under your belt as a start. And those guys can help you along with anything!

i'll shoot something if it is causing problems, a nice light .22 rifle is all you need, they aren't heavy and have very little kick to them.

I started out young, my dad was a huge firearm and hunting enthiust (sp) (and he was not the full camo garb wal-mart type guy)

Bluey
Nov. 24, 2009, 04:44 PM
My closest neighbor is our sheriff and he took me to the range he runs, taught me how to shoot properly with different guns, etc.

You could ask your sheriff who he recommends for someone like you, wanting to get started.

I would say a 22 long basic rifle is all you need to potshot smaller varmint and that doesn't really need much instruction, just some common sense.

I don't think you can get rid of groundhogs by shooting them.
Ask a local pest control business if they do it for you.
There are ways to try to run them off, Gemplers.com has several kinds, castor oil works for that here.

Still, knowing how to use a gun is good thinking.

JSwan
Nov. 24, 2009, 04:55 PM
For the OP -

Here is a link to a list of shooting ranges in VA. See if any are close to you and give 'em a call.

I'm sure it's a bit intimidating - all that camo. But it's deer season - you'll be seeing a lot of it at ranges right now.

Here you go:

http://wheretoshoot.org/Find_Range/wts_subresults.asp

Pocket Pony
Nov. 24, 2009, 04:58 PM
OMG, I love shooting - it is a lot of fun and a good thing to know how to do (of course with the caveat that you know all about gun safety). Mr. PoPo and I go to the indoor AND the outdoor ranges a lot and also do competitive pistol shooting.

Call the gun club / range and ask if they offer private instruction - it is less intimidating that just showing up and trying to rent on your own. A shooting class will teach you all about gun safety and will get you time in the range to practice shooting targets and getting comfortable.

A 22 is what you would want for varmints - they are easy to shoot with almost no recoil. A rifle will be more accurate than a pistol for long distances...say if you want to sit on your porch, sip lemonade, and have at it! :lol:

You will need a lot of range time to practice getting used to the feel of your gun - for such a basic function, there are a lot of variances in magazines, safetys, etc. Getting practice shooting clay pigeons would also be a good way to get used to shooting at something that moves - 'cause varmints are a lot different from paper targets, that's for sure! :D

I find most people love to share their knowledge of the sport and teach newcomers the ins/outs/how-tos of shooting. I learned from Mr. PoPo and one of our neighbors who has a huge collection and loves to take us shooting. We went last weekend and shot old military rifles and hunting rifles and ranch rifles and it was great fun.

Ear protection and eye protection are MUSTS and our range does not allow shooting without them.

Tom King
Nov. 24, 2009, 05:07 PM
I did a quick search to find a trajectory for a.22 Magnum and found this. Scroll down to post #13. The max effective range to be consistantly able to hit something with a .22 magnum is 150 yards. Looks like it drops a LOT at 150 yards if you sight it in at 100. A .22 Magnum would be the minimum for groundhogs.

They can be found around the entrance to their holes at first light and right at sunset.

http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=102205

Groundhogs are very wary and hard to not scare away if you are less than 200 yards away. Most people who shoot varmints use something like a .22-250.

To learn to shoot, get a .22LR since ammo is so cheap. It takes many rounds to get proficient enough to depend on your own skill. Often the availablilty to take a shot is so brief that you don't have time to think about all the details.

Here's another bullet trajectory chart I found: .22Magnum is .22 WMR
http://www.chuckhawks.com/rifle_trajectory_table.htm
The last column shows at what yardage the bullet drops 3". That's the one that makes the most difference in being able to hit something like a groundhog in the head. Notice that it's 90 yards for a .22LR, 123 for a .22WMR, and 254 yards for a .22-250.

wildlifer
Nov. 24, 2009, 05:15 PM
Wouldn't it be easier to get a dog?

Trixie
Nov. 24, 2009, 05:17 PM
I'd like to find a good one in NOVA as well. My dad keeps buying my siblings guns for their birthdays... good little Washingtonians that we are.

Frank B
Nov. 24, 2009, 05:18 PM
Another option is the .17 HMR. Essentially it's a .22 Magnum with a .17 projectile for a trajectory with less drop that the .22 Magnum.

Walmart carries the Marlin 917V (http://www.marlinfirearms.com/Firearms/17HMRMagnum/917v.asp) for about the same price as the .22 LR. It's designed for use with a 'scope, and may be available with the scope mounted and bore-sighted.

I have the .22 version, which is good at 50 yards, but a friend's .17 HMR is a real tack-driver at 100 yards.

Whatever rifle you choose, make sure it's a bolt action. The accuracy is more repeatable than other actions.

Of course, if you want a high Yee-HAA! factor, there's always The Rodenator (http://www.rodenator.com/)! :lol:

Oldenburg Mom
Nov. 24, 2009, 05:18 PM
Wouldn't it be easier to get a dog?

We have a JR, and yes, he has gotten three of the little b@stards, BUT, we are talking serious infestation here. I just found four more holes underneath another building. AND, I really need to do something about this.

I have offered $75 per GH killed. Everybody says "Sure". And then never shows up. After two years of this BS I'm taking matters into my own hands.

Leather
Nov. 24, 2009, 05:22 PM
There are actually a category of guns called varmint rifles for this very purpose--low killing power but accurate at long distances.

http://www.chuckhawks.com/varmint_rifles.htm

Oldenburg Mom
Nov. 24, 2009, 05:48 PM
What, I can't get a .457 magnum and play "Dirty Harry"?

OMom: Hey groundhog,... is today your lucky day?
GH: squuuigggggggghhhhh (guesstimate of what a GH sounds like?)

Ok, kidding aside. That is an excellent reference document. Thank you, leather.

TOM KING! Thanks so much for your reference material.

Isn't it interesting...something so "simple" as getting rid of some GHs turns into a dynamic discussion of velocity, grains, scopes and "drop" rates. Actually, it's quite fascinating.

Thanks everybody!


Of course, if you want a high Yee-HAA! factor, there's always The Rodenator (http://www.rodenator.com/)! :lol:

I would LOVE to do this to those SOB's. And you're right ... it really is the Yee-HAA factor!

Berkley
Nov. 24, 2009, 06:27 PM
Hello

I'm in VA, Goochland County along the James River.....I've hunted quail, grouse and ducks for over 50 years...Having grown up on a 900 acre working farm and now living on a small horse farm; I've sent many ground hogs to their final resting place.....

A sighted in scoped .22 magnum or .22-250 long rifle is the best bet IMHO for a new hunter....They are not easy to kill....I personally use a .243 scoped Ruger # 1......be sure they are dead before picking one up.....I've seen mangled hands result from folks who made the assumption of "Dead".....


Best of luck

Berkley

Oldenburg Mom
Nov. 24, 2009, 06:41 PM
I've sent many ground hogs to their final resting place.....

Don't suppose you'd like a job, would you? Heck, I'll even give you lunch ... and traveling money!

Berkley
Nov. 24, 2009, 06:51 PM
Sure....happy to help gratis.....my pre-retirement hourly rate would be over the top:cool:

Send me a PM.....if to far, I might suggest someone to help you

Tom King
Nov. 24, 2009, 06:58 PM
After thinking about it, my recommendation is to get a Ruger 10/22 to learn how to shoot and a Ruger .204 to off the groundhugs. The 10/22 is a semi-auto and is pretty accurate, so you can shoot a lot without having to fumble with a bolt and a brick of .22LR is cheap and readily available at Walmart. If you decide you don't need to keep it after you get good enough to suit, resale is quick and easy for a 10/22.

After using that until you are comfortable with it, make your own desicion about which .204. The .204 is very flat shooting, with very low recoil, but still has enough impact to do what you want. You could start with the .204 but ammo is a LOT more expensive than the .22.

Google searches will find all the info you need on either.

jdeboer01
Nov. 24, 2009, 07:34 PM
Just an idea...

My husband and I had several groundhogs in a new pasture where we wanted to turn our horses out. We just drove our truck out to each set of holes (each set had one entrance and one exit hole), filled in one of the holes, put one end of a washing machine hose down the other hole, and attached the other end of the hose to the exhaust pipe of the truck. Then we ran the truck for about ten minutes, pulled out the hose and filled the hole in. Haven't seen any groundhogs since.

Oldenburg Mom
Nov. 24, 2009, 07:46 PM
After thinking about it, my recommendation is to get a Ruger 10/22 to learn how to shoot and a Ruger .204 to off the groundhogs.

Google searches will find all the info you need on either.

Well, I did just exactly what you suggested ... and ended up at Cabela ... and ended up looking at their Purdey shotguns for sale ... $14,000+

I get distracted so easily!!!

Tom, automatic seems like cheating! I mean I DO really hate them ...

twofatponies
Nov. 24, 2009, 07:48 PM
The groundhogs are evil. I walk our trail in the area where there are a lot of them, and put big sticks in the holes so we can see then easily from horseback. Some of them are tricky - the grass lays across them, hiding the hole nearly completely. Mostly I just cut out to the road for that section, then come back on the trail. I'm downright paranoid about going faster than a walk on any terrain I haven't carefully walked first, or where there's no existing beaten down animal or vehicle trail.

A friend hit one in an area where we'd never seen any to be, in short grass where she thought holes would be visible, at a canter, and was thrown hard. Fortunately the horse just got a scraped knee and a scraped nose. It could have been deadly.

Tom King
Nov. 24, 2009, 08:30 PM
That's semi-auto. Full Auto is a machine gun. A semi-auto shoots every time you pull the trigger but does require a trigger cycle for each shot. They might not be quite as accurate as a bolt-action, but we have one we can hit a dime with at 100 yards. Only run a couple of thousand rounds through one and you can resell it real quick.

Buy one from your local gun shop which will be more knowledgeable and no more expensive than Walmart. They can hook you up with a decent scope for a reasonable amount and mount it for you too-maybe even sight it in for you. They might even have a used one and can take ithe 10/22 in trade when you get ready for the .204.

chai
Nov. 24, 2009, 08:41 PM
When I lived in ME, I was home alone quite often while Mr. Chai traveled on business. I had considered firearms, and after a rabid skunk got into our barn and almost killed our goose, Mr. chai and I decided to move forward with that idea. The police had to come and shoot the skunk, and they kindly put our poor goose out of her misery, but I felt so helpless, I was furious with myself that I waited so long, but I was afraid of firearms.

The Chief of Police in a nearby town hosted a 'Gun in the Home' course that was fanatastic, and we also took lessons at the range. Mr. Chai bought me a Walther PPK for target shooting and a shotgun to keep on the farm. Thank God I never had to use either of them on a living creature, but once I became comfortable with safe handling of a firearm, I liked knowing that I had them if I ever had an emergency situation, and target shooting is really fun.

I took a refresher course a few years ago and it was very helpful. A good instructor is really the key, because safety is such a priority. Be careful at a public range, because some people are very cavalier with their firearms. If you can find a private range with qualified instruction, that might be the way to go. Good luck.

sk_pacer
Nov. 24, 2009, 08:47 PM
As advised, take a gun safety course first, then see about mooching assorted rifles until you find one you feel comfortable with. For most varmints, I use the Mossburg .22 and fire 22 longs, same with the single shot Cooey which has a habit of pulling to the right and up for some reason. The Mossburg is a heavy old beast (1940's vintage) with a 10 shot magazine but fits me better than the Cooey. For coyotes, I tend to use the 30-30 Winchester - more power over a longer distance.

Things I have learned, well, thing anyway - never shoot at a gopher sitting on a clay mound while facing a building with windows as you will miss the gopher, hit the mound and the ricochet will take out a window in your workshop :)

trinityhill
Nov. 24, 2009, 09:15 PM
For ground hog removal I highly suggest the .22 long rifle.

Find someone to teach you to load, use, clean and care for it safely and correctly. Got any hunting farmers, relatives, friends etc? Ask around, guys with guns love talking, helping, and shooting them and are usually more than happy to help a newbie. Find out your local laws and stick to them.

Than practice practice practice. Once your shot it accurate than it is time to take out the little buggers...

Watch to see what their usual habits are, (mine liked to come out in the morning... which meant hunting in my PJs some mornings) than before they are usually out take a 4-wheeler or truck or tractor, drive it out and park it. Sit on there so there is no foot noise on the ground, bring a cup of coffee and wait. When they pop up, move slowly to raise the rifle to your shoulder, and than fire hitting them preferably in the head, make sure they are dead (may take a second shot if you missed the kill shot). Then bury them in their own hole. Turns out they don't like digging through other dead groundhogs. Gruesome concept but it works wonders. We had a serious problem with them tearing up the main riding field so I used this method and once I had one dead one buried in each hole the rest of the colony moved elsewhere.

Good luck and happy hunting.

mares tails
Nov. 25, 2009, 10:51 AM
Guns? We don't need no stinkin' guns! :lol:
Try this (http://www.rodenator.com/) Organically Friendly Pest Control Method.

.

Frank B
Nov. 25, 2009, 12:20 PM
You can trick that Ruger 10/22 out (http://www.cabelas.com/10-22-accessories.shtml) with all kinds of goodies that'll really wad up a left-wing gun-grabber's panties! I like this one (http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/item-link.jsp_A&_DAV=null-cat20803&id=0034775227757a&navCount=0&podId=0034775&parentId=cat20803&masterpathid=&navAction=push&catalogCode=IK&rid=&parentType=index&indexId=cat601233&cmCat=netcon&cm_ven=netcon&cm_cat=&cm_pla=&cm_ite=netcon&hasJS=true)!

I have one with a 3-9 power scope. A fun plinker and surprisingly accurate for an auto-loader.

MunchkinsMom
Nov. 25, 2009, 01:25 PM
Of course, if you want a high Yee-HAA! factor, there's always The Rodenator (http://www.rodenator.com/)! :lol:

I almost wet my pants laughing - flashbacks of the movie Caddyshack going through my head!

Oldenburg Mom
Nov. 25, 2009, 08:08 PM
Frank B!!!!

I have to admit, a Gatling gun for ground hogs DOES seem a little over the top... but with the infestation I've got ... well, I'm seriously considering it. :lol:

All kidding aside, trinityhill, you've got a very sensible plan. Now, all I have to do is find some sort of assistance.

Off to search ... wish me luck!

Eventer55
Nov. 26, 2009, 01:52 PM
Hey OM

Give me a call, both George and I shoot and both of us have a concealed weapons permit. I would hire someone to shoot the GHs and then you have to have someone buldoze in the holes which can be as deep as 5 ft. Just becasue you kill the GH doesn't get rid of the Gigantic tunnel under the ground that is left. The ground will cave in over time and cause a serious hazard.

Give me a call (ask leslie for my nunber if you can't find it)

I personally wouldn't shoot a GH because if you don't kill it with the first shot what would you do then? Our neighbor shoots all of ours for us with a M4.

And I like something like a Lady Smith for myself:)

fooler
Nov. 26, 2009, 04:17 PM
Which one(s) of you out there are expert(s) ... beside Tom King (of course.)

I have HAD it with the ground hogs, that are now so entrenched under my barn ... well, I don't know what to do. I'm seriously considering buying a bazooka, sticking it down one of their numerous holes (where they live) and pulling the proverbial trigger.

Ok, I am kidding.

But I really should learn to shoot. My BIL, who used to ranch in Montana, recommended a 22 Magnum. Whatever that is. Plus, I really want to be prepared in case any of the wild dogs that live around here start to pester the horses.

What do the rest of you CoTHers do ... ? Can you shoot? Let me know what you'd recommend...and yes, I do know this is NOT going to be a 5-minute exercise. It's going to take a lot of time to learn to shoot correctly and accurately.

Didn't read all of the posts as just will share info from DH. DH has a passion for firearms like we do about horses and has shot, hunted and trained (military and police) thru the years. His 1st gun recommendation is a revolver aka wheel gun. Reason? If you are in a situation where you must use a gun to protect yourself the revolver is mainly point & shoot - as opposed to an automatic weapon that requires additional steps to fire.
Next go to your local gun store and request info about conceal-carry training as well as training specifically for women new to guns. The conceal-carry training is great, makes you familiar with the laws in your state and gives you basic info in what to do in certain situations, it is not all inclusive tho.
Most gun stores with firing ranges will allow to test fire different caliber and types of weapons so you find the one you are most comfortable with.
FYI - my first fun was a 6 shot .22 caliber pistol. Fortunately have never had to use it. Good luck - PM me if you want.

Oldenburg Mom
Nov. 26, 2009, 05:00 PM
Hey Eventer.

Yup, looks like you're the folks closest. And bulldozing is NOT an option. These guys are UNDER my barn. Which actually, now that you've brought all this to my attention is pretty scary.

What am I going to do?????????????????????????????????????????????

(Sorry, got a little carried away with the ?)

Couldn't I use the exhaust ... once they're hibernating? That'd kill 'em.

jdeboer01
Nov. 28, 2009, 10:04 PM
Couldn't I use the exhaust ... once they're hibernating? That'd kill 'em.

Like I mentioned, that's exactly what we did. Simple, humane (they just go to sleep then die) and cheap! :)

Judy

ManyDogs
Nov. 28, 2009, 10:43 PM
LOL
My DH and I went into the local sports store a month or so ago and the guy behind the counter asked DH how he could help him. I hadn't noticed he wasn't talking to me so I rattled off that I wanted a Smith and Wesson .357 with a 4 inch barrel. DH still laughs about me going in there and kicking A**.
(I look like a girly girl but Ah ain't :lol:).
I saw a poster that NRA was holding classes so that might be an option, too. When I had my first .357 we just plinked coke cans on our property but that was in AK where everyone is armed :winkgrin:.
Good luck-we don't have too many groundhogs but the fields behind us are overrun with them.

oldenmare
Nov. 28, 2009, 10:48 PM
One method I found to be most effective with infestations of groundhogs in barn/outbuildings - dump well-used cat litter down the GH holes.... apparently they do not dig through that!

Not the total solution to your problem, but you may be able to limit the number of holes they utilize plus not shoot up your building.

I do have people come out to hunt them in the field - I simply prefer other options in my building areas.