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View Full Version : SPCA won't adopt out dog because we have horses? UPDATE: He's home! Pics post 112 :)



mybeau1999
Nov. 24, 2009, 01:14 PM
We found the cutest little dog (JRT mix) that looks like he could be related to our current JRT mix. He's at the local SPCA, we went and looked at him, filled out adoption forms, etc.

Get a call today. We're not getting him because we have horses and our entire property isn't fenced.

We said we would keep him on a leash until he's trained (he's 1.5 years). And we don't allow them to go in the fields. Other horses are fine with the our dog. Plus we have a good sized piece of property, so it's not like he's going to be playing right next to a busy road. Busiest road is more than a mile away and it's not even that busy..

Is this just our SPCA being dumb? Or have you guys ran into problems getting dogs because of your farm?

It makes me so mad that they have these dogs that desperately need homes and will be put down if no one wants them. A perfectly good home comes along and they don't adopt them out.

Grr. Rant over.

classicsporthorses
Nov. 24, 2009, 01:27 PM
Personally I would raise a big stink. A few years ago we had something similar. We went to go adopt a dog from the SPCA in the neighboring county. Mind you I have raised a ton of dogs and we currently had 4 dogs, three of them on the elderly end.

I am there with my daughter and filled out the application. The woman behind the desk says "Is there a Mr. R?". What bearing does that have. I said "Yes and he's seen the dog". When she sees that we have 4 dogs, she say, get this, "You will have to bring your other dogs here and we have to see them interact with the dog before we make up our mind". I just looked at her and said "are you out of your frigging mind?" I have three elderly dogs, all rescues and TWO from this shelter! Bringing them here would cause them unbelieveable stress.

Then I simply said "I will be calling the exectutive Director on Monday, thank you very much".

We got the dog.

mjrtango93
Nov. 24, 2009, 01:29 PM
That seems really strange for a breed that is known for being around horses, and you have experience with a breed that can be difficult for people that don't know them. I have only heard of 1 other person being turned down when it was found they had horses and property but it was for a site hound, so thats a whole different ball of wax.

Robin@DHH
Nov. 24, 2009, 02:00 PM
Talk to the vet techs who work for your veterinarian.
I wanted to find a dog to replace our previous one who
we lost to heart failure in her teens. I checked with the
humane societies and they would not adopt to a farm
dog life. OK, so now what. Mentioned to the vet that
I ought to get a new dog and her tech took me aside
and explained that there was a "community" of vet
techs in my area who tried to place dogs. I now have
a nice spayed bitch who started life in a regional Indian
Reservation but could not be provided for there any longer.

mybeau1999
Nov. 24, 2009, 02:02 PM
Just talked to the Executive Director - talk about rude. I explained that if keeping the dog on a leash and away from the horses meant that he would be adopted - we'd be more than happy to do that.

She just launched about how they go by what we put down on the initial application because that's what we're really going to do with the dog. No, it's not, we can change how we handle him. PS what dog wants to live it's life on the end of a leash anyway?

When I mentioned our current dog staying on our property and not bothering/being bothered by the horses, that sealed the deal of us not getting him. And I quote "the pack instinct will kick in and they'll both run into the street and be killed by a car". Sure... if your train your dog so it doesn't have a good recall.

So much for trying to save a dog, now we'll go buy something I suppose.

Chester's Mom
Nov. 24, 2009, 02:09 PM
Just talked to the Executive Director - talk about rude. I explained that if keeping the dog on a leash and away from the horses meant that he would be adopted - we'd be more than happy to do that.

She just launched about how they go by what we put down on the initial application because that's what we're really going to do with the dog. No, it's not, we can change how we handle him. PS what dog wants to live it's life on the end of a leash anyway?

When I mentioned our current dog staying on our property and not bothering/being bothered by the horses, that sealed the deal of us not getting him. And I quote "the pack instinct will kick in and they'll both run into the street and be killed by a car". Sure... if your train your dog so it doesn't have a good recall.

So much for trying to save a dog, now we'll go buy something I suppose.


Please don't take one organization's rudeness and lack of flexibleness to color the whole of the rescue world!

One thing about Petfinder, DogsInDanger, email blasts, etc is that the pictures and story reel you in to want a particular dog. And yet, it works better the other way round. Check with local rescues, vets, other shelters and find a group that thinks YOU are gonna be a great home because you are responsible doggie parents. Then let them help find a dog for you!

Win-win. Doggie gets saved and you don't have to deal with folks who are (IMHO) only borderline better than hoarders sometimes.

If you don't have any contacts, PM me! I have a rescue and work with other small private groups and we all know that good adopters come from all kinds of homes/backgrounds... just as the dogs do. :yes:

mybeau1999
Nov. 24, 2009, 02:20 PM
Thanks Chester's Mom - I was actually just cruising around Petfinder while I wait for our farrier to get here ;)

We still want to rescue something... the "guess we'll have to buy something" came out of my POed-ness with the SPCA.

If we don't see anything - I'll send you a PM for sure :)

caryledee
Nov. 24, 2009, 02:32 PM
I found both my dogs on Petfinder...great source of available dogs!

I have some experience with rescues and their rules; my sister runs a cat rescue and I sometimes butt heads with her. She has turned down people for all kinds of reasons. With all the homeless pets in the world, I think rescues need to be a little flexible in their adoption terms!

None of the rescues I have adopted from have minded that I don't have a fenced yard or that I have horses. I think they have seen this as a positive; that someone is truly committed to having animals and taking care of them.

Best of luck on Petfinder...I hope you find the perfect JRT!!

Murphy's Mom
Nov. 24, 2009, 02:38 PM
To the OP - I would just tell them "fine, guess I'll have to go get one from a backyard puppy mill". Our humane society will adopt to anyone who gives them money. They just have too many animals to be picky. As for me, no rescue will let me adopt because I don't have a fenced yard. Doesn't matter that I've shown dogs to multiple obedience titles, frequently attend training classes, have taught obedience classes, etc. All my dogs have been given to me before going through a rescue because I have a reputation locally as the "heeler lady". Cattle dogs and I just click.

KPF
Nov. 24, 2009, 02:56 PM
Check out Danny and Ron's rescue... they are horsepeople who adopt many, many wonderful dogs to other horsepeople. They rock. :)

http://dannyandronsrescue.com/

ETA: check out "Zipper" under the "puppy" section... he is TOO cute!!! JRT/Poodle mix???

Bluey
Nov. 24, 2009, 03:02 PM
Our animal control shelter only can keep dogs three days, so if you are at all normal, not someone that looks like looking for dogs to fight, you can get most any dog adopted very easily, as that gives the dog one more chance.
Of course, no one wants to have to take the dog back or find it dumped again, but that rarely happens, because most people coming to get a dog are sensible and reasonable and not going to abuse a dog.

We have one no kill shelter locally, that gets the lion's share of donations, that tends to warehouse dogs, as they hardly ever adopt one out.

To adopt too quickly may be wrong, some dogs may end up in bad hands, but to be too strict and keep warehousing dogs is definitely not right either, when those dogs are using resources that could help so many other dogs.

I hope that you find a nice dog somewhere, where you don't have to knee and beg someone that let their power over the dog's lives get to their heads.:no:

cyndi
Nov. 24, 2009, 03:05 PM
I had the same problem, but with trying to get cats from our local shelter. We have 12 acres, and live on a dead end street. Our barn cats are fixed, get shots, etc. They rarely roam and live long lives.

Our local shelter - in a fairly rural area, mind you, would not adopt out cats that were not going to be 'house' cats. Far better to put them to sleep because they were not adopted, than to become a barn cat.:no:

FalseImpression
Nov. 24, 2009, 03:32 PM
"You will have to bring your other dogs here and we have to see them interact with the dog before we make up our mind".

It may be an inconvenience, but frankly I agree with that rule and it is one that is in place with the different Humane Societies and rescues that I deal with. I would rather see the dogs interact in a neutral location BEFORE I make the commitment to a dog. I would feel worse if, after getting home, things do not work out and I had to bring the dog back.

The rules I keep reading do state that every member of the household, human or canine/feline, have to come! I really don't see the big problem.

mybeau1999
Nov. 24, 2009, 03:38 PM
Thanks for all the suggestions!

Here is the little guy (although his page says he's a girl):
http://www.aacspca.org/view_animal.php?animalid=9090344

My mom and I filled out the adoption form together, so she's listed as the adopter and i'm the co-adopter. She also called the exec. director - but got a voicemail. If she doesn't get a phone call back she's going to write a letter to the editor of the county newspaper. She's irate. I know they're trying to look out for the animals best interest, but when something good comes along they should be willing to give it a chance for the animals' sakes.

analise
Nov. 24, 2009, 04:01 PM
I was wondering if you were looking at the AAC SPCA (I got my last dog from there, I haven't seen anything on the website lately that I want to go check out though).

You might get a better response if you go in person or volunteer there. I volunteered there (when I was living in Millersville) for months before I found the dog I wanted to adopt (and I feel like the adoption process was easier because they already knew me). Since you're in the area, maybe you could do that? (and then you'd get the chance to get to know the dog in the first place before you take it home).

Otherwise: there are a metric ton of dog shelters and rescues in the area, there has to be one that doesn't mind you have horses. :) (I'm currently on a search, myself, for a dog to adopt. Waiting on pins and needles for a response to an application I sent in.)

dressagetraks
Nov. 24, 2009, 04:27 PM
There are seriously places that want you to bring "every member of the household, human or canine/feline?"

I have a cat who takes at least a month to get past "different" to even begin voting on "good" or "bad." And that's at home. In a strange situation, cats especially I can see as not giving you a fair trial.

I know my cat, and I know the most she will do is slap lightly and growl, just be royally p.o.'d at ANYTHING different. She may love it 6 months later, but the first encounter, or the first hundred, are not going to be a fair evaluation. Heck, when I got another Siamese as a kitten, it took that one nearly a year to even be seen licking her. They get along very well now, with the occasional feline eye roll on the part of the prima dona. Not one fight at any point, just a lot of one-sided growls.

When I just adopted a dog (rehomed through an individual, not a shelter), I asked strictly about her attitude toward cats, not a chaser, etc., but if I had been required to bring mine, nope, they wouldn't have been instant friends. No matter what. Impossible to say "this will/won't work" based on that. The BEST analysis on whether this will/won't work is the owner who knows the other animals well, combined with an accurate history on the current potential adoptee.

The dog has been here for about 3 weeks and is doing great. The cats are slowly warming up to her, except that one, who is still royally p.o.'d. In a few months, when she's gotten over being offended at "different," she send me a ballot and let me know whether she likes the dog or not. If not, she'll just avoid the dog.

She's an extreme case, but I actually can think of very few cats I've owned whom I could take to a new surrounding and introduce there to a totally new animal and get any kind of valid opinion for long-term relationship success between the two. Dogs maybe, but cats, nope.

caffeinated
Nov. 24, 2009, 04:35 PM
Check out Danny and Ron's rescue... they are horsepeople who adopt many, many wonderful dogs to other horsepeople. They rock. :)

http://dannyandronsrescue.com/

ETA: check out "Zipper" under the "puppy" section... he is TOO cute!!! JRT/Poodle mix???

Oh wow! I've seen articles about them before but this is the first time I've seen their website - they have some really adorable dogs!

I especially like the "yellow fluffy mix" ... awwwwww....

Widget
Nov. 24, 2009, 05:04 PM
There are seriously places that want you to bring "every member of the household, human or canine/feline?"

I know that some like the dogs to meet, but I've never heard about it with cats. The SPCA I used to work at did the doggie introductions, but the cat ones they felt were too stressful. But to some dogs it's still too stressful.

pintopiaffe
Nov. 24, 2009, 05:12 PM
Don't even get me going.

I can't adopt a cat from the KILL shelter in the city because I give my own vaccinations. :rolleyes: (with my Vet's blessing I do almost any procedure--up to and including stitches on occaision... )

I HATE the ASPCA shelters around here.

Instead, I have hooked up with the PDs who take strays to other kill shelters... and guess what, I don't even have to PAY for the privilege of getting a kitty that's due for the big blue shot. I can make a donation, of course, but they are happy to get an animal a home when it's time is up.

Chester's Mom
Nov. 24, 2009, 05:16 PM
As for me, no rescue will let me adopt because I don't have a fenced yard. Doesn't matter that I've shown dogs to multiple obedience titles, frequently attend training classes, have taught obedience classes, etc. All my dogs have been given to me before going through a rescue because I have a reputation locally as the "heeler lady". Cattle dogs and I just click.


MM- my rescue would adopt to you. We adopt to folks who have a plan to exercise the dogs according to the dog's needs.... We believe in common sense! Many other groups do to, although in my experience its more often found in small independent groups than those with BODs that have hard and fast rule lists to follow.

I do love Petfinder and we use it ourselves but it does make it waaaaay to easy for some folks to look 'rescue-y' when they don't let dogs go. I know two rescues near me personally who have literally dozens of dogs kept in crates in their homes and yet its like prying teeth to get them to even talk to an adopter. No one is good enough!

And don't even get me started on the local animal control groups who euth rather than let a rescue pull a dog!

OP- best of luck and be sure and update us when you are a new "mommy"!

mybeau1999
Nov. 24, 2009, 05:17 PM
I was wondering if you were looking at the AAC SPCA (I got my last dog from there, I haven't seen anything on the website lately that I want to go check out though).

You might get a better response if you go in person or volunteer there. I volunteered there (when I was living in Millersville) for months before I found the dog I wanted to adopt (and I feel like the adoption process was easier because they already knew me). Since you're in the area, maybe you could do that? (and then you'd get the chance to get to know the dog in the first place before you take it home).



Yea, that's it. I have been down there to see the dog 3 times... took him outside and he's great. Every other dog was barking his head off and he was just sitting, chewing on his toy. He's very sweet.

I'm actually in Millersville... I might go see what's over at the animal control. It's hard to convince my dad to get another dog though - that's why my mom and I were so excited when he agreed to try to get the JR from the SPCA.

Still waiting on a call back from the SPCA though. We'll see what happens...

Chester's Mom
Nov. 24, 2009, 05:21 PM
Don't even get me going.

I can't adopt a cat from the KILL shelter in the city because I give my own vaccinations. :rolleyes: (with my Vet's blessing I do almost any procedure--up to and including stitches on occaision... )

I HATE the ASPCA shelters around here.

Instead, I have hooked up with the PDs who take strays to other kill shelters... and guess what, I don't even have to PAY for the privilege of getting a kitty that's due for the big blue shot. I can make a donation, of course, but they are happy to get an animal a home when it's time is up.

PP and others wanting barn cats.... check with local small animal vets. Our own vet takes in cats "found" or "caught" by several local residents and gets them fixed, vaccinated etc... then looks for homes. There are always a few not suitable for the life of a housecat and they are forever begging for "barn" homes for them!

GoForAGallop
Nov. 24, 2009, 05:24 PM
I had the same problem, but with trying to get cats from our local shelter. We have 12 acres, and live on a dead end street. Our barn cats are fixed, get shots, etc. They rarely roam and live long lives.

Our local shelter - in a fairly rural area, mind you, would not adopt out cats that were not going to be 'house' cats. Far better to put them to sleep because they were not adopted, than to become a barn cat.:no:

Really? That's a shame. My AWESOME local no-kill shelter has a program designed FOR barn cats....the cats who constantly mark inside, or are too feral to ever be good house cats, or those who, for whatever reason, will be better off in a barn. It's better than having to put them down because no one wants them.
http://www.dpvhs.org/

chunky munky
Nov. 24, 2009, 05:32 PM
A second to call Danny and Ron's rescue. I was just on the phone w/ Ron two days ago and they just got about 40 new dogs. Not all the dogs are on the site. These guys do great work and will work with you to get the right pet. I am sure they can find a way to get the dog to you from Camden as well. Ron just told me a bout a darling Schipperke thay just got in. They are getting many because owners can't afford to feed them. Please check out their site and talk to them I am sure they will help you find a wonderful dog.

pintopiaffe
Nov. 24, 2009, 05:32 PM
Chester's Mom--that's what I do basically...


Though, um... I'm all set for kitties for a looooooooong while now mehopes... :p :winkgrin:

Janet
Nov. 24, 2009, 05:33 PM
Rescues tend to be "once bitten twice shy".

If they adopted out a dog to an unfenced property, and the next week it got hit by a car and killed, there is a tendency to say "That's it, we are never adopting to an unfenced proiperty again!".

And that becomes the RULE, even after all the people who knew the orignal dog have left.

libgrrl
Nov. 24, 2009, 05:39 PM
Just playing devil's advocate here...you sound like a lovely home, OP!

I do a *lot* of work with my local shelter (I'm virtually an employee -- just don't get paid!)

Did the shelter have any background info on the dog? It's possible that the dog was a stray (hence possibly a "known wanderer") that was tough to catch -- we've had some of those that were probably not good candidates for your type of situation. We've also had some dogs that were surrendered because they chased farm animals, so we weren't real inclined to adopt them out to a "farm" home, or (typical Jack story) they had had a "bad encounter" with cats.

mybeau1999
Nov. 24, 2009, 05:47 PM
Just playing devil's advocate here...you sound like a lovely home, OP!

I do a *lot* of work with my local shelter (I'm virtually an employee -- just don't get paid!)

Did the shelter have any background info on the dog? It's possible that the dog was a stray (hence possibly a "known wanderer") that was tough to catch -- we've had some of those that were probably not good candidates for your type of situation. We've also had some dogs that were surrendered because they chased farm animals, so we weren't real inclined to adopt them out to a "farm" home, or (typical Jack story) they had had a "bad encounter" with cats.


They said he was given up by his owner because they had to move into an apartment.

4Martini
Nov. 24, 2009, 05:49 PM
DH and I got turned down after an interview with a local rescue - well never even got a call back. I don't think they adopt to people that both work. I was annoyed at first, but we ended up with the best dog ever from somewhere else. I learned about a great program and was able to not only help a dog- but help a prison inmate prepare for a career beyond prison. BTW many prisons have dog training programs - you might look into it in your state!

I'm a strong believer that things happen for a reason. Somewhere else your perfect dog is waiting for you!

KentuckyTBs
Nov. 24, 2009, 06:01 PM
*sigh* I hope you find a dog that works with your family and that the rescue is not silly about you having a farm. That is just ridiculous! I'd much rather a dog be out in the country on a farm rather than cooped up in a tiny apartment only to go out on a short walk once or twice a day.... and most (not all, but a lot) dogs would rather be able to run around on a farm than be cooped up inside as well...

But shelters and humane societies can be strange... I actually am not a fan of "No-Kill" shelters... they tend to warehouse animals and are so strict on adopting out animals that they end up sitting there for months and months- if not years! How fair is that? But then again, "No-Kill" shelters dupe the public into thinking that they never euthanize animals, when in fact they actually just do not euthanize them on the property... they still euthanize animals, just not in their actual building. That is how they can say they are "No-Kill"...

But anyway, hope you find what you're looking for!

Alagirl
Nov. 24, 2009, 06:05 PM
darnit, you are too far away, I am about to rehome my neighbor's dog, sweet thing she is but rude with NO manners...:)

I heard the 'you can't have a dog' before. A lady had picked a black lab, scheduled to be put down the following day for her daughter as companion. The girl had mild cerebral palsy and the mom wanted her to have the dog around...no dice, living to close to the highway.

As stated above, there is no shortage on free animals, through many channels. I picked up 2 kittens from a lady down the road, she took in a preger cat and got a second litter before she could get her fixed.

(I could have gotten the whole box, plus an older black tom, with the extra thumb) :lol:

FalseImpression
Nov. 24, 2009, 06:30 PM
I agree that the feline meet may be pushing it. Maybe they don't insist, but the dogs and the whole family, yes.

When I got my lab from a lab rescue, there was a home visit and the yard had to be fenced. They would not adopt to a non fenced property, especially in the city, or to someone who would tie the dog up because of the lack of fencing.

There is also a cooling period between the time you visit the dog and you actually can take it home, while they check the references, etc. This is the Humane society. The rescues I transport for are even more thorough.

Polydor
Nov. 24, 2009, 06:42 PM
Yup definitly know where you're coming from! The one show jumping facility i worked at went out of their way to try and adopt the ugliest/least adoptable dog from the SPCA. She got turned down because she wouldn't bring in her other dogs. EVEN when said adopted dog would never ever see her other dogs since she doesn't live on same property as the stable. SPCA was more willing to put down the dog. Sooo we went the long way around and the house keeper went and adopted her. Loved that dog , she became my shadow, massive german shepard x irish wolfhound named tiger. (RIP beautiful girl).

Another pet peeve is that SPCA up here in Alberta seemed to have an actual black list against people wanting to adopt cat to be barn cats. My question to them... Have they seen some of those stables?? Fancier then some houses! And the cats are very very loved and treated like royalty.

P.

Susan P
Nov. 24, 2009, 06:42 PM
http://www.companimals.org/
Check this out, Leslie runs this small rescue and if you can show that you can control the dog I'm sure the fact that you have horses, have a farm, etc. will not be the issue since I know she's adopted to that situation before to a neighbor who worked at a horse farm near mine. However she took both dogs back after they were allowed to run all over, she found out because one ended up at my farm, sweet little pit cross. Just a coincidence that it turned out to be "Sparky" and I just happened to stop at her friend's business who called her and she picked him up that night. It happened more than once and that was enough. The adopters were not being responsible. In this case she was right to take them back and at least one of the adopters went back to Mexico so the dog would have been homeless anyway.

Find her rescue and adoptable pets on Petfinder http://www.petfinder.com/shelters/MD117.html and tell her Sue sent you. ;) Everyone around her in Chester County with horses has a dog, and JRT are not unusual, this is hunt country and these little dogs deal with critters that the foxhunters do not want.

Renae
Nov. 24, 2009, 06:45 PM
I had the same problem onec when trying to adopt a Jack Russell from a shelter in Oakland, NJ. They actually said that Jack Russells were not good around horses or good farm dogs! So I ended up getting a dog that had been a puppy that a breeder had not been able to sell, and if I had not been able to find this dog I would have purchased a dog. So I tried to go through a rescue first but the rescue chose to not let a good responsible animal owner adopt an animal from them, which unfortunatly is the animal's loss.

Susan P
Nov. 24, 2009, 06:46 PM
http://www.petfinder.com/petnote/displaypet.cgi?petid=14961378 (http://www.petfinder.com/petnote/displaypet.cgi?petid=14961378)

LOOK! I found you a JRT at Companimals! :winkgrin:

Guin
Nov. 24, 2009, 07:47 PM
What about ADDIE? "ADDIE IS 18 MONTHS OLD AND WEIGHS 45 POUNDS. SHE IS GREAT AT THE BARN. SHE LOVES CATS, DOGS HORSES PEOPLE AND CHILDREN. SHE IS HOUSEBROKEN AND SLEEPS IN BED!"

See? She's already "Great at the barn"!


http://dannyandronsrescue.com/We%20Need%20Homes/female_dogs.htm

Equibrit
Nov. 24, 2009, 07:58 PM
Check out these folks http://www.russellrescue.com/

MunchkinsMom
Nov. 24, 2009, 08:06 PM
The problem is, we are all too honest! Do the shelters come and do a home check to see if you really have a fenced in yard, no barn, etc?

When we were looking for new pups when our older dogs passed away, we filled out applications at several rescues that had dogs we were interested in adopting, they were too slow to even process them. My husband drove 10 hours to GA to pick up Cubby and Jenna after I found them on petfinder, and a week later one of the rescues called back on our application, by then it was too late, we already had new dogs.

SpringOakFarm
Nov. 24, 2009, 08:11 PM
So sorry that it didn't work out for you.

Also, it appears that the SPCA does not apply the same rules state by state because here in VA, I adopted our last dog from them and they knew he was coming to a horse farm. That was 2 years ago and our Tucker has been great on the farm! We do have a fenced yard, but the farm was never a problem.

I do hope that you choose to go through another rescue. For example - we got our other dog through B.A.R.K - a dog rescue in Richmond.

It's so worth it!

Best of luck to you.

Wayside
Nov. 24, 2009, 08:26 PM
Really? That's a shame. My AWESOME local no-kill shelter has a program designed FOR barn cats....the cats who constantly mark inside, or are too feral to ever be good house cats, or those who, for whatever reason, will be better off in a barn. It's better than having to put them down because no one wants them.
http://www.dpvhs.org/

We have a similiar program around here, too :yes: http://www.daneferals.org/

OP has my sympathy, though. I know last year when we adopted our dog, there were many rescues who wouldn't work with us because my son was 4 years old at the time.

clm08
Nov. 24, 2009, 08:30 PM
Yes, it seems that our local Humane Society won't adopt out their dogs to families who live on farms with no fenced-in yards either. A friend who is a veterinarian and lives on a 800 acre farm at the end of a road with no traffic nearby, tried to adopt a couple of dogs from the HS and got turned down because of the lack of a fenced yard. She and her husband ended up buying 2 GSP puppies who lived long, happy lives on their farm.

I adopted a puppy from a rescue in MN thru Petfinder and had a very good experience. I happen to have a fenced in yard, but told the foster family who interviewed us that I was planning on taking the puppy to the barn where we board our horses, where the puppy could go on trail rides with us and play with other dogs at the barn. They were concerned at first because this dog was a stray and can run unbelievably fast! But home he came with us, and loves going to the barn, running along the trails and playing with other dogs. He will chase any critters he finds along the trails but has a very good recall and is very careful to keep an eye on me and never stray very far.

I wish the OP luck and hopefully the SCPA will let her adopt her JRT.

kdow
Nov. 24, 2009, 08:51 PM
Rescue ridiculousness is why we only get dogs from one of our local shelters - I do wish they were a little more careful about how they vet adopters but overall they're fairly reasonable and realistic for the situation they're adopting in.

Several of the other places, they won't even consider us because we don't have a fenced in yard.

(Our yard is the size of a postage stamp, seriously. We prefer big dogs. There's no point in putting the dog in the yard - even our cocker spaniel is too big to really get any exercise in our yard. The only time our dogs go into our yard is if we all happen to be sitting outside in the summer, or if they have to make an emergency pit stop and then someone goes with them. Exercise is via regular long walks and trips to dog parks and other time spent out and about - if I have to run errands, often my dad will go with me with the dogs and walk them around the area where my errands are, so they get to smell new stuff and investigate new places.)

Luckydonkey
Nov. 24, 2009, 08:55 PM
I think i would be placing an add that says something along the lines of .... "Family with Farm looking for new member to join us" we have XXXacres, and farm, etc... the SPCA turned us down because we have a farm, and they won't let us adopt a JRT from them, so we thought we would see if anyone out there who may be considering rehoming their JRT might like to give us a chance!

KPF
Nov. 24, 2009, 08:56 PM
I went thru the same crap trying to get barn cats. Spoke to two different cat rescues that specifically advertised that they were looking for barn homes. First one didn't want to adopt to us because we had dogs. House dogs never visit barn (they're like 10 acres away on invisible fence) and hubby's hunting dogs are in a 6' tall kennel. Also they didn't like the fact that my neighbor (not close, we have 30 acres) had cats and that they "might" interact.... umm... ok.

Tried second rescue, they actually sent someone to do a home visit and she was horrified that the dog kennel was so close to the barn and said "a cat might climb into the kennel"... ummm... OK, if a cat is stupid enough to climb a 6' tall chain link fence to get into a kennel with 4 hunting dogs, I'm thinkin' that cat's probably too stupid to live... period.:lol:

They were both classic "crazy cat people" and I basically told them both that they may as well stop advertising for barn homes since they wanted to be super picky. I wound up getting two kitties from our very own Erin of COTH fame, who is a fellow horse person with common sense, and they are doing GREAT! I wish I'd gone to her first.

So, moral of the story is, sorry but a lot of the animal rescue people are just plain nuts and don't know a good potential home when they see it. You have to find a kindred spirit, which is why I suggested fellow horse people Danny and Ron.:)

Silvercrown90
Nov. 24, 2009, 09:07 PM
About 3 years ago I lost two of my elderly dogs to old age. I was intent on "rescuing" some adult dogs to replace them. I rescued some dogs in the past with no issues.

Rescues and shelters have changed recently, and not for the better! I wasted over 1 year trying to find an adult "rescue". I live on a farm but I also have a fenced-in backyard and no kids. The red tape that I went through to find a dog and get approved was bad enough, but then after I got approved for some reason the dog would get "pulled" from the system.

It was a complete waste of time. I went dogless for over 1 year for the first time in my life. Never again. I know there are still some good rescues and shelters out there, but good luck finding them.

I apologize for the sour grapes, but I am still somewhat bitter about the experience with about 8 - 10 shelters/rescues that I dealt with during that timeframe. :mad:

And, no, I don't need a dog now. I purchased a puppy about 1-1/2 years ago from a breeder, and a second puppy joined my farm in early September (also purchased from a breeder).

tle
Nov. 24, 2009, 09:43 PM
Haven't read all the replies but honestly if you want the dog, have a good friend go in and adopt the dog... then give it to you. My friend worked with a Great Dane rescue but the local shelter refused to turn over dogs to the rescue (the head person had a bad run in with the lady who ran the rescue... who while good with the rescue was a bit nuts). Anyway, they knew my friend from her volunteer work so I went in, adopted the Dane that was there and handed her over to my friend. Turned out great in the end as the sweet girl was adopted by my friend's mom!

honestly I think some rescue type organizations are just WAY to controlling and a lot of dogs miss out on great (albeit not perfect) homes.

mybeau1999
Nov. 24, 2009, 09:53 PM
Haven't read all the replies but honestly if you want the dog, have a good friend go in and adopt the dog... then give it to you.

Not 2 mintues before I read this I mentioned doing that exact thing to my mom.. mainly as a joke. But now, I see it might work. I bet my mom's sister would be willing to help:yes:

We fired off an email to the director tonight because she never called my mom back. Told her how dissappointed we were that they would not adopt a dog out to a large property with horses. We don't allow them to go near the horses and of course, the dog will be leashed until it knows that.

We don't want this little guy's life to be decided by a leash:(
We asked them to call us to discuss, to please reconsider and to come out to our house to take a look at things for themselves. But I seriously want to get someone to go get him for us. Any MD area takers on here???;)

JanM
Nov. 24, 2009, 09:54 PM
I know what you mean about over-the-top rescues. There is a local no-kill shelter that would only euthanize in case of extreme illness or injury-so one dog that failed to adapt to two adoptive homes (not other dog or human friendly) lived for years in a big pen with 6-12 dogs with food, water and shelter plus minimum human interaction. I don't see that as a good way to live personally.

And there was a so-called rescue operating up the street from me, illegally run from a rental house, where the dogs were caged virtually all of the time-until someone (bet you can't guess who) told the local business license inspector about it, showed him the dogs pictured next to the stack of cages, and he took the animal control person with him too--next thing you know she downsized dramatically before they moved to another state to start over again. Plus the 'rescue' wanted about $400 for a little mixed breed unneutered puppy-the humane society and other shelters here charge less than $200 and actually adopt their animals out, unlike the 'rescue'.

I have adopted from shelters before, but my best dog ever was from a co-worker who had a perfectly nice miniature schnauzer, but she just had to have a big dog (in a small house and tiny yard), so I took her on and kept her the rest of her life. Ironically enough the big dog had several illnesses and had to be put down a couple of years later, but my girl lived for many years. I think some of the private or no-kill shelters lose track of the point of adopting animals out and become basically animal hoarders that would rather have an animal live out it's life in some cage instead of with a loving home. I think it's very sad and definitely in the animals best interest at all.

Pascova
Nov. 24, 2009, 10:02 PM
It is all crazy to me-- we ran into the same problem with some of the rescues-- they will adopt a dog out to an apartment in a city where it will be crated for at least 8 hours a day and walked on a sidewalk or put out in a dog run for a few minutes, but will not adopt to an 80 acre horse farm where they dogs can run around and play with people hanging around the barn all day. Completely insane!!!! Hence, we had to go to a local shelter where they did not care, but my sister did drop off her Golden (that she got from the rescue that would not adopt to us) at our farm in July. I feel sorry for her when she has to go back to her city life this winter!

Laurierace
Nov. 24, 2009, 10:09 PM
I got an email from the sheltie rescue in VA stating they wanted to come do a home inspection and I should call and let them know what day would be good for me. I wrote back and said thanks but we adopted a sheltie from a rescue in August! My inquiry to them was from July and it took until Mid November to get back to me. Makes you wonder....

RougeEmpire
Nov. 24, 2009, 10:12 PM
In my experience many of the people "in charge" at ASPC and Humane Society Rescues are social rejects. I too have gone through the BS of over the top red tape ended up feeling "talked down to" and the said screw it and got a "free kitten or puppy" from the 'free pet section of the local paper'. Don't even get me started on the so-called "behaviorist" and such employed by these places. Most of them are a total joke with NO UNDERSTANDING of Canine or Feline psychology. I saw a "certified bahaviorist" try to tame a rather aggressive and overwhelmed large dog by bribing it with cookies and baby talk. I though to myself no wonder that dog has been brought back three times...

And who in there right mind doesn't think a FARM is the perfect place for a Jack Russel??? Such a breed is million time better on a farm than crammed in some apartment wearing a sweater and rhinestone collar and ignoring his name which of course will be "Eddie". Im no fan of Jack Russels but thats mostly because most of them I have ever met were neurotic apartment kept animals that did not get enough time to be a JACK RUSSEL, you know, killing rats, digging holes (to get at rats) and playing with dead rats.

Meredith Clark
Nov. 24, 2009, 10:15 PM
Yea, that's it. I have been down there to see the dog 3 times... took him outside and he's great. Every other dog was barking his head off and he was just sitting, chewing on his toy. He's very sweet.

I'm actually in Millersville... I might go see what's over at the animal control. It's hard to convince my dad to get another dog though - that's why my mom and I were so excited when he agreed to try to get the JR from the SPCA.

Still waiting on a call back from the SPCA though. We'll see what happens...

Same thing happened to me! I went a few times to try to adopt a dog and I found one I was in love with. I was honest (stupid me!) and told them I had 2 cats, and another dog and provided the vaccine records for all of them.

I got a call and said they couldn't give him to me because I have cats. :no:

They said they had done a "cat test" and although he was not aggressive he didn't "back down" from the cat like they want them too..

How many big dogs run away scared from a cat? Also I would never be so irresponsible to leave a new dog alone with my cats until I knew they get along.

I went to AA Co. Animal Control and got my Bella dog and have never looked back!

Oh! I forgot to mention I already have a dog from AA Co SPCA and they STILL woudln't let me adopt another one b/c of the cat issue.

Hampton Bay
Nov. 24, 2009, 10:25 PM
I went through something very similar a little over a year ago. I bought my own property and for the first time had room for a large dog. I have a fenced yard, surrounded by another fenced yard, with the horses in the back.

The dog in question was a very friendly greyhound. Filled out the application, met the dog, turned in the records for the existing dogs and cats, which of course required jumping through some hoops because the records regarding heartworm prevention and rabies shots had vanished from the vet's office. Thankfully I had other documentation.

So after jumping through all those hoops, they just stopped returning the phone calls and emails. Just stopped. No "we have changed our minds, this isn't a good fit for this dog". Just no response. A month later, the dog was still listed on their website.

I ended up getting a dog from a friend though, and she is the best dog! Smart, sweet, great with kids, finally not attacking the cats anymore, just a great dog.

Guilherme
Nov. 24, 2009, 11:06 PM
We found the cutest little dog (JRT mix) that looks like he could be related to our current JRT mix. He's at the local SPCA, we went and looked at him, filled out adoption forms, etc.

Get a call today. We're not getting him because we have horses and our entire property isn't fenced.

We said we would keep him on a leash until he's trained (he's 1.5 years). And we don't allow them to go in the fields. Other horses are fine with the our dog. Plus we have a good sized piece of property, so it's not like he's going to be playing right next to a busy road. Busiest road is more than a mile away and it's not even that busy..

Is this just our SPCA being dumb? Or have you guys ran into problems getting dogs because of your farm?

It makes me so mad that they have these dogs that desperately need homes and will be put down if no one wants them. A perfectly good home comes along and they don't adopt them out.

Grr. Rant over.

We had this happen when we tried to aquire some cats from our local humane society. It's not just your local group.

Some locals are run by level headed folks, but many seem to attract a particularly "off plumb" variety of folks.

"Raising sand" about it probably will do nothing. Move on down the road and find a dog elsewhere.

But remind them of this next time they hit you up for money.

G.

Drive NJ
Nov. 24, 2009, 11:12 PM
The 'animal (dog & cat) reporter' from the biggest in state paper was turned down by the local shelter because while she worked from home she couldn't guarantee that the dog would never be left at home alone (and no the dog did not have separation anxiety). I'm not overly impressed by the reporter, but from her article about it, it was a bit like the scene from "Pretty Woman" when Julia Roberts goes back to the first shop she tried to buy a dress from with gobs of bags of clothes hanging off her arms and dressed to the teeth. "You work on commission? Remember you wouldn't help me yesterday? BIG Mistake"

What I don't get is if they are looking for forever homes for their pets why not do less form filling out (two local shelters have 8 page applications) and more talking to you. When we lost Ivy to CHF at 15, we went looking for a new friend for Jess-a-minit our 12 yo cat. I wanted to be sure the new cat wouldn't make Jess miserable so was asking a lot of questions about the cats and how they work with others. All they wanted to know was that someone would be home all day (not, we work) They also had all kinds of info on how they would be doing home inspections, the cats would need to be vetted 2x a year and were horrified at the idea of allowing us to foster a cat for a while - long enough to really see if the cats would be OK with each other or if we'd end up with an armed camp with a DMZ shifting around the house.

Apparently that was a very.bad.idea. I had thought it would be better to make sure the home was a happy, peaceful forever home rather than not, but to these folks, if they do send along a pet it can never not work out or you are blacklisted for life.

Fortunately, when talking to the vet's office about references, the receptionist hooked us up with a perfect cat so we could leave the shelters behind.

On the other hand there was one shelter where we originally got Ivy and Jess who was great - she talked to me for a long time on the phone and let me know specifically about some cats she thought might work out. We met her at an adoption day (she fosters out her cats and didn't have them all in one place except then) and spent a long time interacting with the cats.

I also saw her chat with other lookers and one woman who wanted a lap cat who would be just as happy dumped off the lap when inconvenient, wouldn't shed or ever have an accident or do anything wrong. The shelter woman quietly suggested a stuffed animal might be the best pet for her needs.

There were some other good shelters who were willing to talk and we probably would have tried to work with had the vet's receptionist not had the right cat, but I'm telling you most people I've talked with are not going to shelters first any more, they are looking for that 'free' puppy or kitten because of all the red tape. Screening is necessary, but how about training the screeners to get a better feel for people rather than coming up with so many blanket rules.

DakotaTA
Nov. 25, 2009, 12:29 AM
Have you checked your Craiglist? 2 jack russells listed, one pure, one mix, for 11/22.

http://annapolis.craigslist.org/pet/1477232746.html puppy mix

http://annapolis.craigslist.org/pet/1477077126.html adult female

Here's a 5-year-old male in Ellicott City (nearby?)

http://washingtondc.craigslist.org/mld/pet/1480870448.html

Whitfield Farm Hanoverians
Nov. 25, 2009, 09:16 AM
Hey OP, I'd get a friend who has a fenced in back yard, & the "perfect" family on paper to adopt this dog, then I'd get it from her. Stupid people for not letting you get him.

SkipHiLad4me
Nov. 25, 2009, 09:32 AM
Rescues tend to be "once bitten twice shy".


This is exactly what it boils down to in many cases :no:

I volunteer with a large Boston Terrier rescue. We basically have had to alter our adoption rules to where we don't adopt out to families with children under 5 yrs old. We've had a lot of our dogs have come to us FROM families with small children that the dogs didn't get along with (aka children harrassed them) or we've had families turn adopted dogs back over to us after they were too hyper for the children. It's not the dog's fault usually... they're just very high energy dogs and many don't enjoy being wallowed on by kids. So in order to avoid dogs coming back to us, and especially coming back to us with behavior issues that we have to work through, we just avoid those situations all together.

The fence thing isn't an instant deal breaker for us but if there are other circumstances we're concerned about and there also isn't a fence, then it might be enough to be the straw that breaks the camel's back. Most people won't exercise their dogs like they're supposed to unfortunately so a fenced yard is hope that the dog will at least get some "out" time.

After you've spent so much time and energy getting a dog ready to go to a new adoptive home, the last thing you want is for that dog to fail (again) or get hurt- whether it be the owners' fault or the dogs' fault.

I'm sorry the SPCA won't work with you on the little JRT though! I definitely think they're going overboard there.

avezan
Nov. 25, 2009, 09:35 AM
Yes, I ran into the same problem when I wanted to adopt a dog last spring. I don't have a fenced yard. I live on a very remote farm. I had just put to sleep my 16 year old dog. I had a really great set up for a farm dog, but the rescues heard "no fence" and "outdoor dog" and that was it. (My dogs do come in for bad weather, but are out the majority of the time). I found a dog on petfinder at a pound 2 hours away. I drove to meet the dog. There were some issues with me getting the dog...he needed to be neutered, they wanted him to meet my kids first... I really couldn't make several trips there, and my kids really couldn't come on the 4 hour round trip drive. This was a hard-luck dog, who was going to get the blue needle in a few days. The director came out and talked with me, got to know me a little, and agreed that my place was a great home for this dog! I could tell he would be fine with my kids, and he is. I got him neutered locally and sent them the paperwork. I took him home that day, and he has been living the good life ever since!
So don't give up. But you may have to try more than one place to find someone who understands the life of a farm dog. :)

pAin't_Misbehavin'
Nov. 25, 2009, 09:58 AM
SPCA's can sometimes be tough to deal with. The rescue with which I used to volunteer had one SPCA who absolutely refused to release a dog to rescue, even if the dog were going to be put down.

I don't know this for sure, but I'd be willing to bet that the rescue got some dogs out of that shelter by sending in ringers to adopt.

I did once fail a potential home for having horses - but it was because they had a scary management plan in place. They thought it was a riot to allow the collies to go chase the horses in from the field. When one collie predictably got killed they wanted to adopt a replacement from us. Uh - no.

But of course, we weren't going to kill the collie if it did not get adopted within a certain time. I don't see what your SPCA has to lose by taking a chance that you will actually do as you say you're going to do. If they keep him, it's just a matter of time till he dies. If someone adopts him, yes, there's the possibility of an accident happening, but then, there's also the possibility it won't. And with the number of JRTs looking for homes, I would think it'd pay the SPCA to take the chance on his behalf.

Good luck with the little fellow.

Erin
Nov. 25, 2009, 11:21 AM
As someone who does rescue, remember, rescuers see the worst of the worst, and they routinely have people lie to them. Trust me, you'd be paranoid and suspicious too.

If you get dinged in an application process, I would NICELY ask to explain your situation. I think most of the time, it's pretty obvious when someone is a good animal person. But I also wouldn't fault the rescue/SPCA for just sticking to whatever its guidelines are... hey, there are zillions of rescues out there, just go to one whose criteria you meet, or rescue an animal off of Craigslist, where most of the people don't care at all about what you're going to do with their pet, as long as you come get it today. :rolleyes:

As far as adopting barn cats... I do not adopt any of my normal friendly cats to outdoor homes, *unless* they are not primo adoption candidates (big, plain tomcats who are not "cute") or have other issues. A barn is not the place for a highly adoptable cat, because that cat has a much greater risk of dying younger.

If you're looking for a barn cat, pleasepleaseplease don't go on Petfinder and look for cute house kitties -- contact rescues and ask them about cats with issues that would make them less adoptable. There are almost zero adoption options for cats with litterbox issues, cats who are difficult to pick up, super-shy cats, friendly cats who were abused on the street and need time to get used to people again, cats with FIV, or older kittens who were rescued from feral cat colonies but just aren't getting socialized very quickly. The rescue I work with is always desperate for barn homes. And we deliver. :winkgrin:

FalseImpression
Nov. 25, 2009, 11:31 AM
For that matter, I think it is the same if you want to adopt a horse, a cat or a dog. It seems to me that you have to be hollier than thou and have pristine stables and paddocks for some rescues to accept you as an adopter! They would rather cry that their numbers are too high than accept that an older barn, trees and blankets for shelter, a run in instead of a stall and love and attention are better than corrals with x horses in so few acres...

The HS in the next town seems to have it right. They work with rescues/high kill shelters in the US and bring in dogs from different shelters. I have seen in their "Adopted" list that some dogs went to live on farms. I know of one dog brought in from the US who appeared on the Adoption list, then disappeared and never made it to the Adopted list. They told me he had issues that needed work and they were trying hard. Another update told me that they had found a breed specific rescue (hound) to take him. I do believe them.

Also one of the rescues I do transport for has adopted quite a few dogs to "farms", as recently as this weekend (a Great Dane). One of their fosters has a horse farm as well. Another rescue is located on a hobby farm with horses/cattle.

I do feel that for some people working in shelters, it is all a power trip. THEY get to decide on who the adopters are and which dogs live or die. Ain't that great? sheesh, sad that it may be the only time they have that "power".

Trixie
Nov. 25, 2009, 01:07 PM
The rescue I work with is always desperate for barn homes. And we deliver.

Indeed, our farm got a barn cat from Erin and have been quite happy with him :)

VCT
Nov. 25, 2009, 01:23 PM
What about ADDIE? "ADDIE IS 18 MONTHS OLD AND WEIGHS 45 POUNDS. SHE IS GREAT AT THE BARN. SHE LOVES CATS, DOGS HORSES PEOPLE AND CHILDREN. SHE IS HOUSEBROKEN AND SLEEPS IN BED!"

See? She's already "Great at the barn"!


http://dannyandronsrescue.com/We%20Need%20Homes/female_dogs.htm

I agree, Addie looks awesome!! If I was in the market for a dog right now she'd be my pick. Very pretty, huge smile and sounds like an excellent, loving, virtually problem- free personality. All my dogs sleep in my bed so thats no issue either LOL.

I hope she gets a great home, she sounds like an awesome girl!

Alagirl
Nov. 25, 2009, 01:40 PM
oh MAN, there is the cutest Beagle mix, looks so much like my dear late Chappy Sinclair, the Iron beagle...:sadsmile:

llsc
Nov. 25, 2009, 02:44 PM
My mom runs a rescue and gets many people with farms who have been turned down by Animal Shelters because their property isn't fenced. If you are looking to adopt she has tons of really lovely dogs.

Friends of Pep Border Collie Rescue, but she has tons of other breeds, because the shelters send her the nice dogs of all breeds that are slated to be put to sleep.

Here's the link:

http://www.petfinder.com/search/search.cgi?pet.Animal=Dog&pet.Breed=&pet.Age=&pet.Size=&pet.Sex=&location=18424

MunchkinsMom
Nov. 25, 2009, 03:14 PM
Am I the only one that sees something wrong with this picture (meaning stupidity on the part of the first shelter)?

Shelter A will not adopt the dog out to anyone without the "perfect" setup - fenced in yard, no other pets or children and the humans are home all day every day, with nothing else to do but dote on the dog.

Shelter A then sends the dog to Rescue B.

Rescue B will find the dog a home due to more reasonable adoption standards.

So, why can't Shelter A learn something from Rescue B's operation and requirements? Or do they choose to sit on their high horse, lament the fact that they have a low adoption rate, and turn a bind eye to the fact that Rescue B has a better adoption rate due to more realistic guidelines for home screening?

Oy!

cheval convert
Nov. 25, 2009, 03:35 PM
Just talked to the Executive Director - talk about rude. I explained that if keeping the dog on a leash and away from the horses meant that he would be adopted - we'd be more than happy to do that.

She just launched about how they go by what we put down on the initial application because that's what we're really going to do with the dog. No, it's not, we can change how we handle him. PS what dog wants to live it's life on the end of a leash anyway?

When I mentioned our current dog staying on our property and not bothering/being bothered by the horses, that sealed the deal of us not getting him. And I quote "the pack instinct will kick in and they'll both run into the street and be killed by a car". Sure... if your train your dog so it doesn't have a good recall.

So much for trying to save a dog, now we'll go buy something I suppose.

When we went to adopt our aussie from aussie rescue they also asked if we had a fenced yard. I replied, "I've never needed one since I teach my dogs to come when they are called." They let me have the dog - I now have a radio fence for the dog who comes only if he feels like it. lol (And yes, we have worked with a trainer for over a year. The dog knows the command but unless I have an electric collar on him, he thinks of it as a suggestion, not a command.)

mybeau1999
Nov. 25, 2009, 03:37 PM
Thanks for all of the links to the dogs - wish I could help them all!!

My mom and I emailed the executive director last night and she called back around 1 today. We explained everything to her and she agreed to authorize the adoption!!! :D

The only thing we have to do is take our Max down friday morning to make sure they get along. If they do, we can bring him home :yes:. So fingers crossed everything goes well!

But, yes, there is something wrong with a lot of the shelters. How do they expect to save more dogs when they can't find good enough homes for the dogs they already have because they're too picky? I'm glad the SPCA saw the light for this little guy (in reality they probably just didn't want to deal with our never ending phone calls and emails;))... but there are so many who aren't lucky enough.

I commend everyone who has a rescue and adopts the dogs out based on their individual needs, and to the rescues who adopt cats out to barn homes when they wouldn't have anywhere else to go.

mybeau1999
Nov. 25, 2009, 03:40 PM
When we went to adopt our aussie from aussie rescue they also asked if we had a fenced yard. I replied, "I've never needed one since I teach my dogs to come when they are called." They let me have the dog - I now have a radio fence for the dog who comes only if he feels like it. lol (And yes, we have worked with a trainer for over a year. The dog knows the command but unless I have an electric collar on him, he thinks of it as a suggestion, not a command.)

Yes, we told them that if we did have a problem containing him we would get an invisible fence - which is the truth. We were going to get it for our first JRT but he ended up not needing it.

trubandloki
Nov. 25, 2009, 03:44 PM
But, yes, there is something wrong with a lot of the shelters. How do they expect to save more dogs when they can't find good enough homes for the dogs they already have because they're too picky?

Not commenting on your situation, generic answer.

They have to draw a line some where. They have to give the adoption counselors a set of rules to follow and those rules can not be 25 pages long of exceptions. The rules are written to meet most situations.

And the idea is not to just find homes for dogs, the idea is to find good permanent homes for the dogs. Which is frequently two very different things (again, not referring to your case). Being adopted and coming back six times is not better, actually worse, than not being adopted at all. People look and see a dog has been returned and they assume there is something wrong with the dog, not the idiot who adopted it and lied on their application and did not follow the rules.

So you put the two things together and you get what happened to you.

Some people trying to follow the rules that were set out to fit 98% of the situations.

MunchkinsMom
Nov. 25, 2009, 03:54 PM
Thanks for all of the links to the dogs - wish I could help them all!!

My mom and I emailed the executive director last night and she called back around 1 today. We explained everything to her and she agreed to authorize the adoption!!! :D

The only thing we have to do is take our Max down friday morning to make sure they get along. If they do, we can bring him home :yes:. So fingers crossed everything goes well!

But, yes, there is something wrong with a lot of the shelters. How do they expect to save more dogs when they can't find good enough homes for the dogs they already have because they're too picky? I'm glad the SPCA saw the light for this little guy (in reality they probably just didn't want to deal with our never ending phone calls and emails;))... but there are so many who aren't lucky enough.

I commend everyone who has a rescue and adopts the dogs out based on their individual needs, and to the rescues who adopt cats out to barn homes when they wouldn't have anywhere else to go.

Good for you and your perserverence. I guess the old saying "the squeaky wheel gets the grease" is true.

Jingles for you that the meeting of the two dogs goes well, and you can bring the new dog home.

Bluey
Nov. 25, 2009, 04:03 PM
Not commenting on your situation, generic answer.

They have to draw a line some where. They have to give the adoption counselors a set of rules to follow and those rules can not be 25 pages long of exceptions. The rules are written to meet most situations.

And the idea is not to just find homes for dogs, the idea is to find good permanent homes for the dogs. Which is frequently two very different things (again, not referring to your case). Being adopted and coming back six times is not better, actually worse, than not being adopted at all. People look and see a dog has been returned and they assume there is something wrong with the dog, not the idiot who adopted it and lied on their application and did not follow the rules.

So you put the two things together and you get what happened to you.

Some people trying to follow the rules that were set out to fit 98% of the situations.


I think that the problem IS the rules and some times too many rules.

Adoption groups need to be flexible, because the dogs to be adopted out and the adopting families are not all from the same cookie cutter mold.

Our animal control shelter also has the problem of three days and euthanizing, so there is tremendous pressure to give most any sensible situation a try, even if a few of the dogs have to be returned.
It is very hard to tell a family no, you are not good enough for this dog and then euthanize the dog the next day.
You (the generic you) try that, day after day, dog after dog.

No Kill shelters have the luxury to refuse adoptions, with good reason or on a whim, but then, they don't have to DO something with all those many dogs a day that come in and have nowhere to go but to the landfill in three days.

Alagirl
Nov. 25, 2009, 04:16 PM
Am I the only one that sees something wrong with this picture (meaning stupidity on the part of the first shelter)?

Shelter A will not adopt the dog out to anyone without the "perfect" setup - fenced in yard, no other pets or children and the humans are home all day every day, with nothing else to do but dote on the dog.

Shelter A then sends the dog to Rescue B.

Rescue B will find the dog a home due to more reasonable adoption standards.

So, why can't Shelter A learn something from Rescue B's operation and requirements? Or do they choose to sit on their high horse, lament the fact that they have a low adoption rate, and turn a bind eye to the fact that Rescue B has a better adoption rate due to more realistic guidelines for home screening?

Oy!


I don't think shelter A sends dogs to shelter/rescue B

But rescue/shelter B is the option for the people who have been turned down by shelter A.

BLBGP
Nov. 25, 2009, 07:57 PM
Keep in mind that all SPCA's are independent. Don't write them al off because of one bad experience. :)

Bogie
Nov. 25, 2009, 08:36 PM
Glad you got the director to come around!

Eight years ago I wanted to get a dog for my daughter. We found a great Westie at a local no kill shelter. He was about a year old. They wouldn't adopt him to me because I had children and terriers can be nippy.

A friend of mine who works with dog rescues told me that she would go adopt him for me :winkgrin:. Luckily the shelter figured out that he was raised with children and had no problem with them and we were able to get him without any issues.

Yes, I think that shelters need to be careful, but they also need to place dogs and cats. I am an experienced dog owner who has managed dog/child relationships. They wouldn't even let me come in and see how the dog would do with my child.

Fast forward to now. We've had Kirby now for 8 years and he's a doll.

chism
Nov. 25, 2009, 09:02 PM
It makes me so mad that they have these dogs that desperately need homes and will be put down if no one wants them. A perfectly good home comes along and they don't adopt them out.

Grr. Rant over.

It's EXTREMELY frustrating & counter productive to the welfare of the animals and the mission of adoption agencies in general.
I tried to adopt two feral cats last year. I offered to adopt them when I saw a post on another Equine BB that said they would be put down because they were un adoptable due to their feral nature. The agency was supposedly desperate for barn homes. I spoke to one of their agents on several occasions & was promised two cats..they even sent me pics of them which I shared with my children. We made plans to have them delivered on the weekend. I called them up to confirm the date/time & some random other person decided to deny me because my barn set-up didn't meet their standards which I found amazing since she had NEVER even seen my house/barn!! It really soured me on the whole "adoption" deal. I won't ever attempt it again.

Trevelyan96
Nov. 25, 2009, 09:25 PM
OP, I'm also in MD and had the same problem with some of the area 'rescues', but it was the opposite problem. When I told them I had a fenced yard, they wouldn't adopt to me because they were afraid the dog would be left outside! I was like 'huh' ????

I'm in Charles County, and our local animal shelter always seems to have a lot of JRTs , and found they're pretty easy to deal with. I got my little guy there, I think he's mostly a Patterdale They won't adopt unless the dog passes temperment test and is heartworm neg. For the adoption fee they spay/neuter, rabies shot, worm, and micro chip.

PM me if you want to check them out. They try to keep healthy dogs as long as possible.

Trevelyan96
Nov. 25, 2009, 09:57 PM
What's really laughable about the whole thing is who in their right mind that knows anything about Jack Russels would think they can be contained by a fence anyway? Mine's a patterdale, but if he picks up even the slightest hint of a small animal scent in the air, or hears our friends outside with their schnauzers, he's over that fence and gone! That's why he's mico-chipped and also wears an ID tag with our phone #.

Susan P
Nov. 25, 2009, 10:15 PM
If anyone wants barn cats within a 2 hour drive of northern Delaware let me know, I'll get you some. If you're within an hour they will give you only one if that's all you want, but if you live further they need it to be worth the trip so you would need to take 2 or more and that's what they recommend anyway.

You have to be willing to crate them for at least 3 weeks with food, water and clean litter then provide food, water and shelter. They will clean up your mice.

Susan P
Nov. 25, 2009, 10:17 PM
I second that!



As someone who does rescue, remember, rescuers see the worst of the worst, and they routinely have people lie to them. Trust me, you'd be paranoid and suspicious too.

If you get dinged in an application process, I would NICELY ask to explain your situation. I think most of the time, it's pretty obvious when someone is a good animal person. But I also wouldn't fault the rescue/SPCA for just sticking to whatever its guidelines are... hey, there are zillions of rescues out there, just go to one whose criteria you meet, or rescue an animal off of Craigslist, where most of the people don't care at all about what you're going to do with their pet, as long as you come get it today. :rolleyes:

As far as adopting barn cats... I do not adopt any of my normal friendly cats to outdoor homes, *unless* they are not primo adoption candidates (big, plain tomcats who are not "cute") or have other issues. A barn is not the place for a highly adoptable cat, because that cat has a much greater risk of dying younger.

If you're looking for a barn cat, pleasepleaseplease don't go on Petfinder and look for cute house kitties -- contact rescues and ask them about cats with issues that would make them less adoptable. There are almost zero adoption options for cats with litterbox issues, cats who are difficult to pick up, super-shy cats, friendly cats who were abused on the street and need time to get used to people again, cats with FIV, or older kittens who were rescued from feral cat colonies but just aren't getting socialized very quickly. The rescue I work with is always desperate for barn homes. And we deliver. :winkgrin:

trotification
Nov. 25, 2009, 11:49 PM
I had the same problem, but with trying to get cats from our local shelter. We have 12 acres, and live on a dead end street. Our barn cats are fixed, get shots, etc. They rarely roam and live long lives.

Our local shelter - in a fairly rural area, mind you, would not adopt out cats that were not going to be 'house' cats. Far better to put them to sleep because they were not adopted, than to become a barn cat.:no:


Kudos to you for fixing your barn cats. Too many barn owners add to the kitty overpopulation problem !

MunchkinsMom
Nov. 26, 2009, 12:42 AM
I don't think shelter A sends dogs to shelter/rescue B

But rescue/shelter B is the option for the people who have been turned down by shelter A.

Alagirl, I was talking about this scenario:


My mom runs a rescue and gets many people with farms who have been turned down by Animal Shelters because their property isn't fenced. If you are looking to adopt she has tons of really lovely dogs.

Friends of Pep Border Collie Rescue, but she has tons of other breeds, because the shelters send her the nice dogs of all breeds that are slated to be put to sleep.

Here's the link:

http://www.petfinder.com/search/search.cgi?pet.Animal=Dog&pet.Breed=&pet.Age=&pet.Size=&pet.Sex=&location=18424

Alagirl
Nov. 26, 2009, 11:55 AM
LOL, but I would expect that in that scenario the shelter A would not have a problem to adopt out to a less than picture perfect home.

I mean, that is going out and about to give the critter another chance.

midnightdream
Nov. 26, 2009, 01:12 PM
I am up in Canada and we have the same issues up here. The humane society if very picky about who adopts. You are pretty much not going to get a cat or dog if you live on a farm and I even know of one older gentleman who wasn't given a cat because of his disability. This gentleman was perfectly capable of taking care of an adult cat (didn't want a kitten because he felt it would be too much for him) and I know the humane society has lots of them who are older and just want to cuddle with their owner, but they wouldn't adopt out even with a doctor's note. I think it's sad when there is such a need for homes for these animals and they are denying them to people who will care for the animals properly and have the animals' best interests at heart.

Guilherme
Nov. 26, 2009, 01:20 PM
The humane society in Knox County has euthanized an average of 12,500 small animals per year for the last three years. And they have some of the pickiest rules I've ever seen.

I know an assistant district attorney who tried to obtain a dog and was totally frustrated by more red tape that she had when she adopted a child.

Sure they must have some standards to ensure that they don't put animals into abusive circumstances, but when the standards are so strict that you're killing 12,500/yr. you really need to look to the reality of your program.

G.

clint
Nov. 26, 2009, 01:48 PM
I do a lot of volunteer work and fostering for a local rescue, and recently had a friend ask me about getting a barn cat. Our rescue has a fellow who does a ton of trap/neuter/release of ferals, and over the last year that colony has come to include many, many dumped cats who are friendly. We don't adopt out our house kittens/cats as barn cats, but we are thrilled to be able to relocate some of these "feral" cats to barns; it is a much better life than living in a feral colony. Anyway, we were delighted to place a beautiful, young torti with her who had been dumped in the colony. This cat had been so desperate for companionship that she jumped in our volunteer's car and wouldn't get out. Our rescue has lots more like that who are fixed and just need some place to go, and I'm sure that rescues all over the country would be grateful to relocate cats to a barn who have found themselves in similar straits.

Hampton Bay
Nov. 26, 2009, 10:17 PM
What's really laughable about the whole thing is who in their right mind that knows anything about Jack Russels would think they can be contained by a fence anyway?

That's a very good point. I have seen many of them climb fences. Not just jump up to the top and haul themselves over with their front legs. Actually CLIMB.

mybeau1999
Nov. 27, 2009, 12:12 PM
Well we took our dog to meet "JR" and they got along great! They actually kind of even ignored each other. So we signed the papers and brought him :D

Once we got home we had a few minutes of "romp-a-room" as they chased each other around the house, having a grand old time. The new guy got a bath and now every one is relaxing.

We're thinking his new name might be Tucker... but Tag, Oliver and Chewy are also options at the moment.

He's absolutely adorable!

Claddagh
Nov. 27, 2009, 12:31 PM
WOW! Congratulations!!! :) What great news! I'm so glad that you didn't give up on getting him. And it is wonderful that your dog and the new little guy are getting along right from the start. I bet they will be best buds for life! I'm just so happy for all of you - and especially for little "Tucker" or "Oliver" (like those two names you're considering) :yes:

Now go and take some pictures so that we can all admire your new baby! ...please... ;)

Bluey
Nov. 27, 2009, 02:25 PM
Wonderful.:)

Now, you can't tell us all that and not have any pictures to go with it?;)

Any of those names seems fine.:yes:

vineyridge
Nov. 27, 2009, 06:04 PM
On my anti-HSUS high horse again, but one of their "good works" is training shelter management personnel. If they are the ones who are pushing/training for shelter rules that accept only "perfect homes" for adoption, then won't the euthanasia rate go up, leading even sooner to a world without domestic animals?

Meredith Clark
Nov. 27, 2009, 06:37 PM
On my anti-HSUS high horse again, but one of their "good works" is training shelter management personnel. If they are the ones who are pushing/training for shelter rules that accept only "perfect homes" for adoption, then won't the euthanasia rate go up, leading even sooner to a world without domestic animals?

I always forget which large rescues are legit, the Humane Society are sorta crazy that don't think people should own animals (PETA-ish) and the SPCA is ok and the Humane Association is ok right?

Bluey
Nov. 27, 2009, 06:52 PM
I always forget which large rescues are legit, the Humane Society are sorta crazy that don't think people should own animals (PETA-ish) and the SPCA is ok and the Humane Association is ok right?

The HSUS is an organization run by some animal rights people that came over from PETA.
At last count I read uses only some 4% directly for the animals they claim to try to help, of the millions they gather every year from donations from the gullible.
Here is more on them, including their financial statistics, for you to be amazed over and some quotes by their members, all that to be found on the menu on the right:

http://www.activistcash.com/organization_overview.cfm/oid/136

The local humane associations are the ones that run the shelters and have adoption drives, etc.

The SPCA, I don't really know, but I think they are also locally run.

JanM
Nov. 27, 2009, 06:53 PM
Meredith-the HSUS national organization, and PETA are basically the same type of organization that are basically dedicated to wiping out all animal companions and domestic animals. They don't give money to any local program unless they will get tons of positive publicity for them, and they give nothing to local shelters. There have been many cases documented where they are allied with radical organizations such as Animal Liberation Front and the others who turn animals loose from labs and fur farms to died in the wild, and the PETA people had two employees going down to NC and getting give away animals from vet clinics and I think shelters too, promising good homes, and euthanizing them in the back of the van and dumping the carcasses in a grocery store dumpster-dumping the bodies is how they got caught.

The ASPCA New York is one I contribute to because they do have a great medical facility, a spay/neuter mobile van, and are law enforcement officers. The Philadelphia ASPCA is the one that raided the Murder Hollow Basset Kennels and threatened the owner into surrendering animals or haveing them confiscated and put down, and be prosecuted too. The NY ASPCA is not a national organization like HSUS is, and the other ASPCA's around the country are also independent.

sidepasser
Nov. 28, 2009, 02:57 PM
Try Lori of Sunkissed Acres - she gets dogs from time to time and mostly they are just weary, need love and food and a good landing place.

My Baby came from Lori - she is a wonderful dog, very, very smart. She loves McDonald's Cheeseburgers and if I go to McDonalds, she rides in the backseat and waits for "her" cheeseburger.

I wish I could teach her to order for herself as I forget she doesn't like pickles..those end up on the back seat..lol..

I don't like to try to get a puppy from some of the "rescues"..some are just plain ridiculous with all their "requirements"..jeez..it's a dog folks, dogs like to dig, run, get nasty, roll in dead things, and bring you stuff they think is important. Sometimes important things are horse apples, baling twine, plastic coke bottles they have chewed on, even a halter if they can reach them.

Farms are GREAT for dogs as long as the dog is supervised and not allowed to chase the other critters. Too bad most rescues have no common sense.

I prefer my adoptees to be fully grown, housebroken and leash trained, the rest I can deal with, but the older I get, the less I like holes dug in the yard, housebreaking, etc. But most rescues won't adopt to me.. I have a farm..the house is a mile off the road, and the property is fenced, but not "dog proof"..and no..I am not limiting my dogs to staying in the house or on a leash at all times when I have 32 acres of prime "dog friendly" land a mile off the paved road. Not fair to the dogs who love to run through the fields!

Good luck on your dog search!

mht
Nov. 28, 2009, 10:26 PM
check out this story about what is happening now between the Toronto Humane Society and the Ontario SPCA.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/toronto-humane-society-officials-to-be-arrested-charged-with-cruelty-to-animals/article1378385/

FalseImpression
Nov. 28, 2009, 10:33 PM
Isn't it awful? To me, the THS president is a hoarder extraordinaire. His addiction was facilitated by his position. Proper care? how about "giving them the gift of letting them go without suffering"?

And he defied the order to put down the pit who mauled a little boy 3 years ago... and the dog went for a police man right away... what a life that dog had! in a crate in an office all the time except for pee breaks.

I just hope the charges stick and the penalties are as heavy as they can be!

kipster
Nov. 28, 2009, 11:05 PM
So glad to know I'm not alone. I was rejected by our local rescue group because of no fenced yard. I couldn't believe it at the time. As my previous two dogs had died at the age of 13 after a well loved life. It did not matter that we have a routine of daily exercise and have put CGC, agility and obedience titles on our dogs they still rejected us.
What made it worse was neighbors who do have a dog fenced area - but get a new dog yearly (for various reasons) were able to 'adopt' a dog from this rescue. It made me upset at the time. I wrote a letter to the director and then adopted a great dog from another rescue and love this dog dearly!

HenryisBlaisin'
Nov. 28, 2009, 11:55 PM
I can even beat the "no fence" excuse. I put in an application on a dog through our local Humane Society and one of the questions on the application had to do with what would happen to the dog if you suddenly became unable to care for it. I put that either my roommate would take care of it (or take it permanently) since she would know the dog already, or if she couldn't, my family would. I got turned down because I didn't write that the dog would be returned to the rescue! I can see why they would want that, but really? Why ask if that's the only option? And is returning the dog to the rescue REALLY better for the dog than going to someone who already knows her and whome she knows? Seriously.

On a side note, I do think that was a cover. My roommate and I went to the adoption event together (DUH, the dog would be living with both of us, that seemed to make SENSE) and I think the foster parent in charge of adopting out that dog thought we were a "couple" and her little homophobic self decided to discriminate because of her completely untrue assumption!

deacon's mom
Nov. 29, 2009, 08:52 AM
So I went to another county. I have the same thing - acreage, cul-de-sac, excellent vet care, plus a heated and air conditioned tack room.

I ended up adopting two cats. One has congestive heart failure and cost me over $3k to get well (she's fine - just has grey gums) and the other was infected with toxoplasmosis and is now my bedroom kitty (and she's adored by all).

I understand the horror stories and why the shelters don't want to adopt out but still. Folks told me to lie to get a cat but that didn't seem right. Perhaps it was meant to be since I was willing to spend so much money on barn cats. (They are all family members to me).

Susan P
Nov. 29, 2009, 09:51 AM
You're an angel!



So I went to another county. I have the same thing - acreage, cul-de-sac, excellent vet care, plus a heated and air conditioned tack room.

I ended up adopting two cats. One has congestive heart failure and cost me over $3k to get well (she's fine - just has grey gums) and the other was infected with toxoplasmosis and is now my bedroom kitty (and she's adored by all).

I understand the horror stories and why the shelters don't want to adopt out but still. Folks told me to lie to get a cat but that didn't seem right. Perhaps it was meant to be since I was willing to spend so much money on barn cats. (They are all family members to me).

JanM
Nov. 29, 2009, 09:59 AM
Henry-if you had adopted through that so-called rescue I'm sure that homophobic loser would have been the person that monitored you (it always seems to work that way). So the dog lost in the process but you didn't since you don't have to deal with them again. Now you can go to Danny Robertshaw's site and get another dog from them-unless you already found another dog somewhere else.

Zu Zu
Nov. 29, 2009, 10:04 AM
Congratulations on your new dog, Tucker? ~ any photos ??? Glad you were able to adopt him. Enjoy !

AnotherRound
Nov. 29, 2009, 01:49 PM
That's a very good point. I have seen many of them climb fences. Not just jump up to the top and haul themselves over with their front legs. Actually CLIMB.

I just wanted to add a little story to this: I adopted a border collie/flat coated retriever mix, and swear to Dog, this dog could climb a 7 foot chain link fence, paw over paw. Never saw anything like it. Took him about half a minute to get out of anything not entirely wired together on all six sides, and then he would work at it all day and all night with his teeth. Just wasn't going to be contained. But isn't that wild, when a dog climbs a fence like that? LOL!

Alagirl
Nov. 29, 2009, 02:01 PM
I just wanted to add a little story to this: I adopted a border collie/flat coated retriever mix, and swear to Dog, this dog could climb a 7 foot chain link fence, paw over paw. Never saw anything like it. Took him about half a minute to get out of anything not entirely wired together on all six sides, and then he would work at it all day and all night with his teeth. Just wasn't going to be contained. But isn't that wild, when a dog climbs a fence like that? LOL!


Sounds like the reincarnation of my Mom's Great Dane: She would climb over, dig under and if that was not an option she's hang onto it and pull until the chainlink fell open like a zipper.

We eventually had a dog pen constructed out of rebar mats, sunk into the ground and bend inwards. Next step would have been land mines I suppose...:lol:

Pelican Bay
Nov. 29, 2009, 02:07 PM
I can even beat the "no fence" excuse. I put in an application on a dog through our local Humane Society and one of the questions on the application had to do with what would happen to the dog if you suddenly became unable to care for it. I put that either my roommate would take care of it (or take it permanently) since she would know the dog already, or if she couldn't, my family would. I got turned down because I didn't write that the dog would be returned to the rescue! I can see why they would want that, but really? Why ask if that's the only option? And is returning the dog to the rescue REALLY better for the dog than going to someone who already knows her and whome she knows? Seriously.

On a side note, I do think that was a cover. My roommate and I went to the adoption event together (DUH, the dog would be living with both of us, that seemed to make SENSE) and I think the foster parent in charge of adopting out that dog thought we were a "couple" and her little homophobic self decided to discriminate because of her completely untrue assumption!

I had the opposite problem. I adopted a dog from the pound and we had her a year and tried everything to get a bond going with this dog and could not. The only member of the family she responded to in the slightest was my daughter when she spoke Spanish to her. :confused: Anyway as the year progressed, the dog got more and more aggressive with the horses to the point I was afraid she would harm my foals that were going to be born in a few weeks. I decided that since neither the dog or we were happy with the living arrangement the only real solution was to take her back to the pound per our contract. When I arrived at the pound they wanted to know why I had brought her back to them instead of trying to find her another home!! I told them that my contract said I had to bring her back. They said they did not enforce that and please take her home and attempt to find another place for the dog! I insisted they take the dog per THEIR contract. So they charged me a 48.00 fee to take the dog back...
I will get a farm dog off craigslist the next time.

animaldoc
Nov. 29, 2009, 02:27 PM
OP - congrats on your persistence and glad you got your new family member! :)

While I understand rescues need to screen, I have had some crazy experiences (before and after becoming a vet)....

One time I went to the shelter (Knox Co.) in the place of one of my friend's husbands (who is an ENT Dr. and working) get a cat for my friend who had just lost hers (to old age). They wouldn't give me one because I wasn't a family member (even though he was on the phone telling them he had asked me to go), and because they wouldn't keep the cat inside. They live on 13 acres and have a great house, guest house and barn (with 4 stalls and 2 horses). Pretty nice place for a cat.

As I was leaving, they let the cat that lived at the shelter OUTSIDE and chuckled about how it was impossible to keep him in since he would just cry at the door......seriously?

Luckily, the woman's son was walking past a dumpster in a parking lot one night after that and heard mewing - he fished the kitten out of the dumpster it had probably been dumped in when the students left for Christmas Break. That kitten lived to a ripe old age on the farm.....and managed to co-exist quite nicely with the kids, horses and the Labs.

I agree with the others that say sometimes the rules are a little strict - so many get euthanized that might have good homes if the rules were relaxed.

My dog lives inside and sleeps on my bed, but does every dog have to? Yes, the dogs are happier inside and more a part of the family, but if it's the difference between being an outside dog with a warm doghouse and food/water in a bowl and euthaniasia......

My cats live inside, but do all cats need to? Cats DO live longer inside, but if it's the difference between being a barn cat (with the risks that come with that lifestyle) and euthanasia.....

I think sometimes the rescues are just encouraging people to lie since it's the only way reasonable people can get around the rules. I know a great couple that lost their last Golden at age 14. When they tried to adopt from a Golden Rescue near them, they wanted an adult since they figured it would be nice to give a home to a dog that others might not want. They didn't get the dog because they admitted they didn't always use a leash with their last Golden. After all - she hadn't needed a leash for the last several years - she couldn't go far with her arthritis, and didn't want to since she was so bonded to them! They tried to tell the rescue that the new dog would always be on a leash, but the damage was done.

I told them they should have called me before filling out the application and I would have told them what to say.....another dog missed out on a home.....

r (home to a rescued JRT, two rescued cats, and an OTTB)

Guilherme
Nov. 29, 2009, 03:04 PM
The director of the Knox County animal shelter is going to be the guest on "DIALOGUE", a call-in program on WUOT on Dec. 2 @ 1 p.m. The ad for program notes that they euthanize 70% of the 17,000 plus animals that get taken in. I might just give them a call and point out my experience of several years ago (no cats for me as they would live in the barn and have to work for a living).

I don't have a problem with a review to reduce the risks of placing an animal in an abusive environment, but catching mice in a barn hardly seems abusive (at least from the cat's point of view).

Maybe if a few more folks called and asked this kind of question it might be "reality check" for the folks in charge. But, then, maybe not.

G.

Bluey
Nov. 29, 2009, 03:28 PM
Many years ago our neighbor had lost their dog and wanted a lab.

I had been going to our animal shelter, helping out there and on my way. driving by there, I had seen at least ten labs in the local no kill association's pens.

I told him I go with him, because they had odd hours, three days from 2 to 4PM, two days 11 to 12PM.
We drove over there, got there five minutes before they opened at 2, the gate was closed but unlocked, so we walked in and saw a dog that my neighbor was interested in a pen right by the door.
We knocked at the door and a lady came out and closed the door behind her, like she was hiding something, we thought later.
We told her we were looking for a dog and if that one was for adoption.
She ignored the question about that dog and jumped all over us for walking in when they were closed and herded us back out the front gate, locked it and left us standing there. It was a little past 2 pm by then, when they should have been open.:confused:
I had heard several not so good stories about them, now I had my own.:no:

We went on to the animal control shelter a few streets over.
As I knew, he didn't find what he was looking for right then, but was going to come in a few more days to check.

Then a friend asked if someone needed a lab, as her one year old was not going to be breeding quality, she didn't pass her early hip exam, so she spayed her and was looking for a home.
That is the dog my neighbor kids grew up with and still today happy running around their place.:cool:

I hope the OP is happy with her new dog and taking many pictures, so we can see the handsome fellow happy in his new home.:)

mybeau1999
Nov. 29, 2009, 04:20 PM
I know - how can I post about Tucker:D being home and not post pics???

Sorry for the delay, but here are 2 of his most flattering (normally he's a blur;))

Tucker's on the right:
http://s953.photobucket.com/albums/ae17/MyBeau1999/Tucker/?action=view&current=Tucker047.jpg

Tucker's on the left (note to the spca - he's on a leash!:lol:):
http://s953.photobucket.com/albums/ae17/MyBeau1999/Tucker/?action=view&current=untitled.jpg

He and Max are getting along VERY well. And Tucker likes sleeping in my bed, which is what I was hoping for since Max ditched me for my parents' bed a year ago....

Bluey
Nov. 29, 2009, 05:35 PM
What a handsome pair of dogs.:cool:

Thanks for the pictures, they were worth the wait.:yes:

Glad that they let you have him, after all.:)

I can't believe that they were so hard on you.:no:

FalseImpression
Nov. 29, 2009, 05:38 PM
I guess I can count my blessings that the Ontario Lab Rescue let me have my dog without any problem! I filled out the application, she called, asked me a few questions, called one of my references and my vet, called back saying she could bring him for a meeting on Saturday and if we did not want him, she had a foster in town for him. While there, she checked the fenced yard, saw the crate set up for him and left him. She told me I had the week to decide before she would give my cheque to the vet clinic that performed the neutering.
Never looked back and I am still in touch with her. Oh, and she brought a "Welcome" basket from a local pet store too. Guess where, 4 years later, I still go and buy my dog food, treats and toys?

I explained that I wanted a younger dog since I had to put two senior dogs to sleep in the last two years (my 12 yo lab and the ?? yo Golden we had rescued). He was 7 months old and we were his 4th home... and last! I can understand the questions, but I realize sometimes the restrictions are too much. My barn owner got a dog off CL (kijiji here) because she is on a farm. The dogs NEVER go towards the road (very long driveway). She would like to have them as house dogs, but they don't want to go in, even the puppy!!! I guess she would not stand a chance with the Humane Society or SPCA!?

Bluey
Nov. 29, 2009, 05:50 PM
A friend lost their old dalmatian, that they got at the animal control shelter some 14 years ago as a puppy.

A few months later, they went back there and got an ACD/pit cross, about five months old.

They love this dog and he goes in the pickup all the time while he does chores, but they can't get the silly dog to want to stay in the house for longer than a visit, then he wants out, even in blizzards.:eek:
He has a dog house and they keep putting a blanket in there, but he pulls the blanket out and sleeps on it, even when it is snowing on top of him.

They have seen him in the night, playing under the yard light with coyotes.
Guess he has his own friends he parties with at night.:p

Zu Zu
Nov. 29, 2009, 06:17 PM
Love the photos ~ thanks for sharing - Handsome guys ~ Max and Tucker !

animaldoc
Nov. 30, 2009, 12:09 PM
What a cutie! Glad he's home!

And G- if I still lived in TN I might call in Wed!

Guilherme
Nov. 30, 2009, 03:44 PM
What a cutie! Glad he's home!

And G- if I still lived in TN I might call in Wed!

I spoke to my collegue today and she might call, too.

There are some other East TN folk that might read this. I thinks it's an issue that needs to be pressed.

I'll report back if I get in and get an aswner (on the last point people in positions like this are as slippery as eels on this sort of issue).

G.

Meredith Clark
Nov. 30, 2009, 04:13 PM
What a happy update!

These things always seem to work out whether it's finally getting the dog, or like me (and many other posters) finding the dog of our dreams somewhere else after we were rejected! :lol:

I've really been thinking about getting involved with my local SPCA now that i'm out of college and sort of settled. I just hear that it's go such political issues within..

Chester's Mom
Nov. 30, 2009, 04:25 PM
A friend lost their old dalmatian, that they got at the animal control shelter some 14 years ago as a puppy.

A few months later, they went back there and got an ACD/pit cross, about five months old.

They love this dog and he goes in the pickup all the time while he does chores, but they can't get the silly dog to want to stay in the house for longer than a visit, then he wants out, even in blizzards.:eek:
He has a dog house and they keep putting a blanket in there, but he pulls the blanket out and sleeps on it, even when it is snowing on top of him.

They have seen him in the night, playing under the yard light with coyotes.
Guess he has his own friends he parties with at night.:p


Too funny! My Cairn is like that... out in ALL weather...

Guilherme
Nov. 30, 2009, 05:16 PM
What a happy update!

These things always seem to work out whether it's finally getting the dog, or like me (and many other posters) finding the dog of our dreams somewhere else after we were rejected! :lol:

I've really been thinking about getting involved with my local SPCA now that i'm out of college and sort of settled. I just hear that it's go such political issues within..

Walk carefully around any "animal welfare" group. They are not all created equal.

I did five years as the VP (and Large Animal Committee) of our local humane society. At that time the directors were most "cat and dog" folks. They were also pretty reasonable (even if our president wasn't).

Then, five years after I left the organization, I could not get "barn cats" because they would not live in the house and the "yard" was not fenced. A perimeter fence around about 100 acres didn't count. Today our local shelter euthanizes about the same percentage as Knox Co. does and has the same extremely restrictive rules.

I don't say "don't do it" but do say to be real careful and ensure that you're dealing with reasonable folks and not a bunch of zealots.

G.

jumpjesterjump
Dec. 5, 2009, 10:52 PM
my fiance and i tried three different times to adopt animals (dogs and cats) from the local no kill shelter they would not adopt to us. they had to check all the references and make sure you had a vet first. when we finally recieved a phone call from them almost a month later we had already adopted from Animal Control (where they euthanize after 1-2 weeks). There are some animals at the no kill shelter that have been there for years! the shelter employees were telling us "oh yeah Buzz has been here for 5 years, we just can't seem to find him a suitable home" i wonder why when the poor dog has been cooped up in a 6x10 kennel his entire life with no socializing, you walk past the kennels and hope you don't get your arm taken off.

We found our 3 dogs at two animal control shelters and one rescue, the 2 cats came from parents and friends. they all live happily in the same household. the dogs know not to chase cats, unless the cats chase them first :)

i'm with everyone else on why the shelters and other animal rescue/ ASPCA type places are holding onto the animals, if you find a home that is "almost perfect" i would think that would be a better situation for the animal than spending its life in a shelter. i just don't understand people sometimes.

Heinz 57
Dec. 6, 2009, 08:12 PM
Like many others, I feel your pain! I'm glad you ended up with the dog you wanted, but some of the hoops we have to jump through are silly. I've been looking for a rescue dog, but have run into some issues.

I'd like to find a young adult border collie or sheltie - no older than about 3 or 4, and if a BC I'd prefer a rough coat on the smaller side (under 50lb). Just needs to be housebroken. I like the herding breeds, especially those two, have experience with them and enjoy obedience training. I don't want a puppy - I don't have the time to work on potty training and would rather not subject my new house to accidents or the chewing phase of puppyhood.

I haven't even applied with the only BC rescue I know of in the pnw because they clearly state that they don't adopt to homes without fenced yards. They have a very pretty female that I would just love to bring home and would happily pay the $150 adoption fee and drive the 7 hours to do it. But....my four acres doesn't have a 'fenced yard', nevermind the fact that I would never leave a dog out in the yard alone, fence or not. I've had dogs my entire life and they have always been indoor/outdoors under supervision only dogs. No one goes outside off leash until they are reliably trained to stay with me and not venture out of sight (and come when called!).

I watch craigslist but finding a purebred border collie or sheltie is a joke on there, and if you do, good luck getting to it in time. I swear people just want the animal gone NOW and don't care where it goes. I don't know how many emails I've written describing what I'm looking for, my lifestyle, etc. just to get no reply, not even saying thanks but we found a home for fido.

Falconfree
Dec. 6, 2009, 08:27 PM
Heinz, look up the BC Rescue Forum (or the rescue section of the BC Boards). They are great resources for finding a rescue BC. Good luck. :)

OP, congrats! Tucker is a cutie! I can't believe they wouldn't adopt to you because of horses and not being fully fenced. I was absolutely jubilant when a horseowner with some land adopted one of our young foster Border Collies. That was the best match I've seen over my fostering years.

I know some rescue groups will say on their websites that they won't adopt without a fenced yard (or to a family with young children, or whatever), but I've been told before that those are usually just guidelines. It is worth asking if they would take specific circumstances into account. But on the other hand... we got turned down by one of the major Papillon rescues because we have 2 Border Collies ("oh noez, big dogs!" lol). Even though all the Pap owners I personally know are also BC owners. :/


I just wanted to add a little story to this: I adopted a border collie/flat coated retriever mix, and swear to Dog, this dog could climb a 7 foot chain link fence, paw over paw. Never saw anything like it. Took him about half a minute to get out of anything not entirely wired together on all six sides, and then he would work at it all day and all night with his teeth. Just wasn't going to be contained. But isn't that wild, when a dog climbs a fence like that? LOL!

Haha, reminds me of a Cocker Spaniel we had when I was really little. We had a 12 foot wooden privacy fence and Caleb would climb it and escape, never did figure out a way to keep him in (even replaced the fence, it was originally only 6 feet). One day we didn't manage to get home in time to bring him when a thunderstorm hit (thunderphobic) and he climbed the fence. Ended up getting hit by a car and dragged himself a mile and a half to go lay in front of our vet's practice. Crazy! We were so relieved to get that call from the vet, and amazed that he apparently recognized the building.

Bluey
Dec. 6, 2009, 08:33 PM
There are some very good breeders of herding border collies in your area of the PNW.
They regularly have mature individuals that don't work well for herding and look for obedience homes for them.

You could contact some and see if they have what you are looking for.
You can ask here for herders in your area or see when they have a herding trial and go ask around there:

http://www.usbcha.com/


The sheep group generally has the rougher coated, smaller dogs, the cattle group the leggier and shorter coated ones, but not necessarily.