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View Full Version : Race History for a TB currently at Finger Lakes?



danceronice
Nov. 24, 2009, 10:32 AM
Someone who knows how/where to look up race records--I am looking for the past performances of a 7yo FL bred bay gelding named Lucky to Cope. He's raced in Florida, Deleware, Pennsylvania, and New York (Finger Lakes) that I know of. Currently trained by Jared Schoeneman. AFAIK, he's had 68 stars, 4 wins, and has done best on turf. The trainer thinks he was raced at least once on poly.

I'm in the process of buying him as a trail/pleasure/field hunter prospect and all I really want to know is if there any long layoffs or anything else that looks unusual. The vet who did the PPE does not think there are any old unsoundnesses and he has not had any major injuries with his current trainer, but I'd like to know if anything jumps out. Everyone who has handled him lately including gallopers has nothing but praise for his temperment, and the trainer would keep him as a pony if he had the space, so I don't think I'm going to change my mind, but I'd like to know if there are any major surprises lurking from three or four years ago before he was at this barn.

MintHillFarm
Nov. 24, 2009, 10:38 AM
Check out the Daily Racing Form - www.drf.com

You will likely have to pay, but it is the way to go...

MintHillFarm
Nov. 24, 2009, 10:41 AM
RACE RECORD: Race Record in NA/US
2004 1 0 0 0 $115
2005 5 2 0 0 $19,350
2006 9 0 2 2 $7,680
2007 17 1 2 2 $52,275
2008 13 1 0 0 $10,427
2009 19 0 0 3 $5,127
Totals 64 4 4 7 $94,974

This is what I found on bris.net (a free report but no real details)
site:
http://www.brisnet.com/cgi-bin/fc_display.cgi?userfile=P67142130174838

Pronzini
Nov. 24, 2009, 10:59 AM
Equibase is your friend.

http://www.equibase.com/premium/eqbHorseInfo.cfm?refno=6464897&registry=T

MintHillFarm
Nov. 24, 2009, 12:28 PM
You can also go to

http://www.fingerlakesracetrack.com/new-york-horse-racing.aspx

This will let you look at video replays of his races at this track...

jengersnap
Nov. 24, 2009, 12:56 PM
I did a good scan of his PPs on equibase and nothing unusual. The owner/breeder had him for a long while, then he was with one other ownership before his current owner/trainer. Ran very regularly with the usual up and down results seen in moving tracks/ownership/class level and his campaign has been pretty much his whole life without significant time off so he's got to be an iron horse. When he was a "better" horse they raced him less (normal) and then when he was a cheaper claimer he raced more (normal also). So if anything he might enjoy a little time to rest, say a month or so to unwind and let any old aches from just being in use so long feel better, then restart him slowly and see what he says. He'll probably be jumping fences by the spring though and hacking nicely before that. Just one more thing to enable you (been reading your posts on the FL thread as well ;) )

Oh, Presque Isle would be the poly start for the current connection. In my skimming, I didn't see anything else besides dirt, no turf.

maunder
Nov. 24, 2009, 01:16 PM
I bought the past performances for my Number from Equibase. Quick and easy - they download to you.

danceronice
Nov. 24, 2009, 02:00 PM
Thanks, everyone! The last time we looked for a past performance was so long ago my parents did it!

Jenger--the trainer (who's quite fond of the horse by all accounts including his own!) had recommended he be given a couple months off to just relax after a long season, and as that's what I was planning to do anyway I'm glad he concurs! His trainer did think he had run on turf, which was why he'd been sent to try poly, and thinks he's just not a dirt horse at heart, but he didn't know much about his career before he acquired him. As I also think one reason my old horse was a spaz the first year was that he went from being at the track to jump training in six weeks, I'm also very enamored of the idea of some turnout time before I even think about training!

caryledee
Nov. 24, 2009, 02:39 PM
That's what I like about buying my OTTBs in late fall/early winter. They can have the winter to relax (when I don't want to ride anyway!) and when the weather starts turning nice, they are ready to start their new careers! :)

I am DYING to get on my new FL boy though; he is just such a cool horse to be around!

And by the way, Lucky to Cope is GORGEOUS!

danceronice
Nov. 24, 2009, 02:53 PM
That's what I like about buying my OTTBs in late fall/early winter. They can have the winter to relax (when I don't want to ride anyway!) and when the weather starts turning nice, they are ready to start their new careers! :)

I am DYING to get on my new FL boy though; he is just such a cool horse to be around!

And by the way, Lucky to Cope is GORGEOUS!

Lol, the place I'll be at has lights on the outdoor but no indoor, and given it's Michigan I am not planning on doing much riding for a while! I figure we can bond over grooming, handwalking, and cookies. Or possibly skijorning if the snow gets TOO bad...it may be my only way to travel!

I showed pictures of a few FLFs (Finger Lakes Finest) to my more 'horsey' friends and the response was pretty overwhelmingly OMG BUY THIS ONE! Well, my brother said "He's a little short for my taste" ("I'm not buying him for YOU! But there's a 17hher on there..." Bro prefers and looks better on a taller beast.)

And my Mom said "Another bay, huh?"

http://www.facebook.com/jennifer.quail?ref=profile#/photo.php?pid=1467403&id=508320766&fbid=29102240766 That's my old horse.

My ponies were all bay, two (mare and two foals.)

Someday I'll own a chestnut. Maybe.

caryledee
Nov. 24, 2009, 03:07 PM
I've always gotten plain bays myself...until this year! I now own 2 chestnuts with chrome!! Of course, I still have 3 plain bays! :)

A good looking horse is a good looking horse no matter what color he is though, and Lucky to Cope is beautifully put together. He reminds me of my first horse who was plain bay, but he was one of those horses people would always take notice of.

I bet you will have loads of fun with him, even before you start riding!

jengersnap
Nov. 24, 2009, 03:09 PM
As I also think one reason my old horse was a spaz the first year was that he went from being at the track to jump training in six weeks, I'm also very enamored of the idea of some turnout time before I even think about training!

All depends on the horse I guess. For some reason, I'm seeing ours transition to riding horse much easier and faster then most.

My chestnut TB mare bowed at 6. 2 months stall rest and I started riding her as a pleasure horse. She was certainly "tough" at the track, and I'm no dare devil lol We just did a parade this weekend, just over a year later, and she's been a multitude of other places. The only thing I've found she can't stand is monkeys screeching when we go by the zoo, but giraffes and wolves are ok. :lol:

Just retired our 10 yr old at the end of our meet (Oct). Had him cow sorting 3 weeks after his last race.

Retired a 5 year old this summer after he finished a race and stopped dead still at the end with a "what the heck was that" look on his face. Outrider went up to him, broke his trance when he looped the pony strap through the bridle, and he happily loped back to us, not a thing wrong with him. Went back to the farm the next day and was packing the new owner's 8 yr old daughter around less then 2 months after that, walking and trotting like he's carrying a basket of eggs on his back. "Mom" has to remind her not to let go of the reins when they are just standing around as he prefers to stand stock still with his ankle bent, dozing. She has to kick for the trot, and finds that annoying LOL Mom pops logs and hacks alone with him w/t/c

They are all so different, but having the game plan of time and treating anything sooner as a bonus is the best bet overall. Lucky sounds lucky to have caught your eye :)

danceronice
Nov. 24, 2009, 03:38 PM
Well, my old guy (the one in my sig file) was bought off the track by a H/J trainer who basically took them right into under saddle/over fences, and if they were strong, they got a pelham and a standing martingale and lunged in side reins. In my horse's case, he was retired not because he didn't want to run but because of injury and he never had time to learn that he was not supposed to be a race horse. He was also four and gelded after she bought him. It took a long, long time for him to settle down. Like until age six or seven with a trainer switch. So I'm hoping for a substantially less exciting time this round!

foundationmare
Nov. 24, 2009, 06:07 PM
Lucky to Cope is the bomb!