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Meredith Clark
Nov. 19, 2009, 08:50 PM
I've just gotten into using hoof boots and I admittedly don't know exactly what i'm doing!

My horse used to wear shoes (front shoes) but he could not keep them on in the summer and I like to pull them for the winter anyway so I decided to get him Old Mac's so I could keep riding him without soreness.

The Old Mac's I got him fit well (i'm almost positive!) but are just sort of clunky and I think he's still getting used to moving in them and I'm getting used to the sounds they make. My friend had inserts called "Old Mac Sole Savers" which she said were great and helped with fit and comfort but I don't see that they make them any more.

They do have "Comfort Pads" (http://www.easycareinc.com/Other_Products/Comfort_Pads.aspx)

but how do I know what thickness I need?

I'd love to use them year round instead of shoes but I just don't know, he feels like he doesn't move as freely with them and they're sort of a pain to fit and put on.

tips, advice, recommendations are welcome!

craz4crtrs
Nov. 19, 2009, 10:13 PM
There are side inserts for horses with narrower shaped hooves, but I've never used any sole covers.

I just pulled my oldies front shoes and he went for a ride yesterday in his Old Macs. He was a little careful at first, but then he happily trotted and even loped a little down the trail.

If your horse doesn't have sore feet, I wouldn't use pads in the bottom.

The new G2's are a little less clunky. Someone borrowed those and haven't returned my pair. :(

Bank of Dad
Nov. 19, 2009, 10:27 PM
I used the Cavello pads (red) inside mine when his feet were sore. I don't think I need to use them now that they have hardened up. It may make the boots twist a little, I'm not sure. Last yr, I had that prob. in the back.

Meredith Clark
Nov. 19, 2009, 10:35 PM
If your horse doesn't have sore feet, I wouldn't use pads in the bottom.


Really? I figured they couldn't hurt esp since the bottoms have no padding themselves and exposed metal washers or something.



The new G2's are a little less clunky. Someone borrowed those and haven't returned my pair. :(

I wanted the G2's but my horse didn't measure like they would fit him (his feet are almost as wide as they are long) and the tack store near me only carries the original.

Nezzy
Nov. 20, 2009, 08:21 AM
get the 12 mm, b/c they squish down very fast. I hate my Old Macs. They are clunky and my horse would get rubs. i am loving the Easyboot Edge.

PRS
Nov. 20, 2009, 08:49 AM
I've used Old Macs for a couple of years now. Love 'em. I have the gaiters which are really good about preventing rubs or chafes and help keep debris out of the boots. I have used the "comfort pads" but they fell apart in fairly short order. I was thinking about about getting some of the leather pads that farriers use and cut them to fit inside the boot. Like these: http://www.jeffersequine.com/ssc/products.asp?CID=1&mscssid=NVBRUC2QN1V68MX5E939EE8NWJ8515X8&BrowseList=465&dept_id=1056 (about 8th or 9th item down)
Since the gaiter wraps have a plastic piece that goes inside the boot under the hoof I thought about putting this leather pad over the top of it.

Eddy's Mom
Nov. 20, 2009, 10:11 AM
Pads are always a good idea in boots, they prevent peripheral loading of the foot.

I would considering going to a newer generation of hoof boot- Easyboot Glove (my absolute fav), Edge or Epic. If you don't like those, you could try Renegades, but they are fairly clunky and some horses don't move well in them.

craz4crtrs
Nov. 20, 2009, 10:53 AM
Really? I figured they couldn't hurt esp since the bottoms have no padding themselves and exposed metal washers or something.



I wanted the G2's but my horse didn't measure like they would fit him (his feet are almost as wide as they are long) and the tack store near me only carries the original.

Depending on your horse's feet, pads may take up too much room causing rubbing on the heel.

If they are slightly big, the inserts velcro in and take up the slack. If your horse has tender skin, you can use the gaiters and they take up some more room, too.

For long rides, sandy, hills, etc, I have just used vet wrap around the heel bulb and no rubbing.

I have never had any issues having bare hoof in the boots. I have used them on 6 different horses and no problems (I have 3 pairs).

How about using a wash cloth or something thin instead of the pads?

Meredith Clark
Nov. 20, 2009, 04:51 PM
Pads are always a good idea in boots, they prevent peripheral loading of the foot.

I would considering going to a newer generation of hoof boot- Easyboot Glove (my absolute fav), Edge or Epic. If you don't like those, you could try Renegades, but they are fairly clunky and some horses don't move well in them.

Thanks for the suggestion! I already have the Old Mac's and I really don't want to have to go to the trouble of finding another boot that fits. I do plan on putting shoes back on him in the spring.

I know it sounds lame but I've found it to be quite a pain fitting these boots! I have to go to the store and buy them one at a time because they're pretty expensive. You can't really try them because then the store won't take them back, and if they end up not fitting you're stuck with them!

I haven't tried the Easyboot Glove (Dover doesn't sell them yet I don't think) but I tried the regular Easy Boots and they were hard to get on but seemed to fit and on our first ride came off about every 5mins. I had to get off and put them back on and it was a mess! The metal rope thingy also frayed and sliced my finger open :mad:

juanbadcat
Nov. 21, 2009, 10:29 AM
I used the Old Macs for low level eventing our first season. I have size 3, just measured his hoof and bought the correct size. I also have the sock inserts that prevent sores and rubs on the bulbs, it all worked but I found it a bit
strenuous each time I put them on. I kind of dreaded it, but he stayed barefoot for a year. I also used the same pair of Old Macs on our rescue horse that came footsore, he wore them in the pasture during the day and I took them off at night when he was in his stall. They really helped the horse feel better. You never know when you'll need them.