PDA

View Full Version : Spinoff--Box Stall Trailers



vineyridge
Nov. 18, 2009, 09:49 AM
What are the downsides to horses riding in regular trailers in box stall configuration? If one never hauls more than one horse at a time, are there any real downsides to letting them have the freedom of the full trailer width?

And if one is using a trailer box stall, would the horse be tied or free? I've noticed that mine always seem to prefer riding with their heads away from the truck.

NancyM
Nov. 18, 2009, 10:08 AM
I was looking for a four horse head to head trailer, that could be used as such, OR two boxstalls. Couldn't find one in my pricerange in a timely fashion. Found a six horse angle haul Featherlite, an old one. Bought it, used it ONCE like that... it was horrible. Had it completely changed over, into three travelling box stalls. The stalls are 7 feet wide and about 8 feet long (4' of deck is tackroom onto the gooseneck). The front stall has it's own ramp, so only the middle stall does not have a ramp. Interior doors are slam gates. I LOVE this trailer. It is a luxurious three horse trailer. The horses love it, they load easily, and travel relaxed, it gives a lovely smooth ride. They are not tied in there. Since most of my horses live together anyway and know each other, I have the option of putting more than one horse into each of the box stalls. I have shipped seven horses in this trailer, in the three stalls. So I have multiple options on how many horses I can take places, or pick up to bring home.

The only downside is the deck length of the trailer, which you drag around with you no matter how few horses you are shipping. But once on the highway, this doesn't make a huge impact. Backing up is easier than short decked trailers (my hubby, ex trucker, told me this and to my surprise, I have found it is true). But it has taken a while to get accustomed to the amount it drops in going around turns (my last trailer had a 16 foot deck, this one has a 30 foot deck).

So I find there are huge bonuses to having a trailer set up like this... going somewhere that has no stabling, horses have their stall in the trailer, and have been content to stay in there. No pawing or fussing, or confinement/claustrophobic problems. I have seen others with similar trailers who do tie horses in box stalls, especially if more than one horse in the stall. But I haven't done this with mine yet. Leaving them both loose in there has worked fine too.

ponygirl
Nov. 18, 2009, 10:40 AM
What are the downsides to horses riding in regular trailers in box stall configuration? If one never hauls more than one horse at a time, are there any real downsides to letting them have the freedom of the full trailer width?

And if one is using a trailer box stall, would the horse be tied or free? I've noticed that mine always seem to prefer riding with their heads away from the truck.

I have yet to find a downside. I do this when I'm hauling just one in my 2+1. I haul loose. Mine also turn around so they are facing backwards when loose which was one of the main reasons I actually purchased a backwards facing trailer. lol Figured the horses knew how they liked traveling so I got a trailer to accomodate them.

eventersmom
Nov. 18, 2009, 10:46 AM
We have a 2 horse straight load Trail-Et that has removable dividers and can be used as one large box stall. We love the box stall configuration and so do our horses. Generally we tie our horses but it is because our neurotic she-mammoth tends to panic if she is loose.

NoDQhere
Nov. 18, 2009, 11:25 AM
There are no down sides :lol:. We have hauled hundreds of times over the years in box stalls, loose, and never had a horse that wasn't happy as a clam that way. We used to haul our two stallions in each "end" of our 5 horse head to head, with all their "stuff" in the middle section. Never a problem. We came very close to a serious accident where I had to slam on the brakes to avoid a crash and the horses were just fine. Being loose, IMO, gives a horse the ability to adjust themselves more quickly than if they were in a tie stall of any configuration.

The deck length is a "consideration", if you go head to head. Ours is 30' plus the goose neck and I have found a few places I just can't get in to. But all in all the benefits out weigh the "can't get into the WalMart" issues :lol:.

TrotTrotPumpkn
Nov. 18, 2009, 11:37 AM
When I am borrowing a trailer I choose the stock trailer and leave him/her loose. I only borrow the 2 horse featherlite bp if I have to use a bumper pull because of the hauling vehicle.

My horse vastly prefers the stock trailer--I know because he loads. He hates the featherlite. He's not a huge horse either--about 16 hands. So it isn't that he doesn't "fit."

I'm torn on getting a stock trailer or a more conventional trailer...

grinanride
Nov. 18, 2009, 12:38 PM
The only caution I have is to make sure your standard trailer is set up for box use - make sure any escape doors are strong enough to withstand what a horse may do and there are outside latches and bar guards, most straight loads with walk out doors would not qualify - I always haul loose
Risa
HappyTrailsTrailers
BalancedRideTrailers

dmalbone
Nov. 18, 2009, 01:57 PM
Can I ask a REALLY stupid question? What's the difference between box stalls in a horse trailer and using a stock trailer? We do not have a trailer right now, but my horse has hauled in straight load/slant load/open stock and he much prefers to have a 1/2 stock trailer to walk around in.

TrotTrotPumpkn
Nov. 18, 2009, 04:09 PM
Can I ask a REALLY stupid question? What's the difference between box stalls in a horse trailer and using a stock trailer? We do not have a trailer right now, but my horse has hauled in straight load/slant load/open stock and he much prefers to have a 1/2 stock trailer to walk around in.

I think the people with "box stalls" are probably driving head to heads, etc. that they are converting to one or more box stalls. Stock trailers--well you know that one.

I think it would be a similar experience for the horse, all things (suspension, etc.) being equal. Except the stock has more (for some arguably too much) ventilation.

Cloverbarley
Nov. 18, 2009, 04:21 PM
I'm another who has transported horses thousands of miles loose in my box stalls trailer. Even for short journeys I always transport loose. Horses like it and travel better and more quietly when they are loose, in my experience.

cutemudhorse
Nov. 18, 2009, 06:53 PM
I also agree w/hauling loose in a box stall, or removing the divider in a two horse when hauling only one. A good point was made by Risa; be sure the escape doors latch securely, or are locked w/a key if they don't have outside latches.

I'd like to ask if anyone has ever had their horse fall down when hauling loose though. One professional shipper told me he likes them snugged up in a slant load (okay, it's a quarter horse guy w/smaller horses) with the point being that they have something to lean on if he has to slam on the brakes suddenly.

Also, how would if affect the rig if you had a horse that did move around suddenly, or even frequently? I did not haul my four year old loose on a long trip this past summer because I was going through mountains and was concerned about the load shifting at inopportune (sp?) times. I see someone did post that they don't let their "stall walkers" travel loose.

vineyridge
Nov. 18, 2009, 07:35 PM
Mine is a gooseneck. I'm not sure I'd be nearly as interested in hauling loose box style with a BP. In fact, the very thought gives me shivers.

f4leggin
Nov. 18, 2009, 09:08 PM
I haul in a 2 horse bumper pull with no divider all the time - never had any problems. If I'm taking more than one horse (which hardly ever happens), I would probably use my stock trailer. A few years ago, I had a shipper pick up a 7 yr old mare that had only been hauled loose in my BP trailer - starting with Mom when she was a baby. When asked if she loaded, I responded - of course, she's an easy loader! When the trailer showed up - I thought oh crap - she has never been tied in a trailer or done anything but be loose. But, since she had always had happy experiences in the trailer, she walked right on their slant load, stuck her head in the hay net, and traveled like a champ....

Jill

Cloverbarley
Nov. 18, 2009, 11:30 PM
I'd like to ask if anyone has ever had their horse fall down when hauling loose though. One professional shipper told me he likes them snugged up in a slant load (okay, it's a quarter horse guy w/smaller horses) with the point being that they have something to lean on if he has to slam on the brakes suddenly.
We have a commercial equine transport business and I can say no I have never had a horse fall during transit. As to the horse having something to lean on in emergency braking - horses almost always travel backwards with their butts against the head of the trailer, so their brace position is to lean against the front of the trailer/gate, depending on which stall they are in.


Also, how would if affect the rig if you had a horse that did move around suddenly, or even frequently?
It doesn't affect it at all if the MAM is correct. You must use a tow vehicle capable of the tow capacity. Yes you can feel a horse moving, but with the MAM and your MTC figures worked out correctly then there shouldn't be an issue at all.

cutemudhorse
Nov. 19, 2009, 05:46 PM
Cloverbarley, thanks! But what is MAM and MTC exactly? ( I realize it's technical for the ratio and/or balanced weight distribution (??) of the rig, but. . . ??


I pull a 2H GN w/DR, 3500#/per axle with a Ford F350. I do have complete faith in the rig and how the dealer set it up.

starkissed
Nov. 19, 2009, 06:13 PM
I have been curious about this myself. I have never hauled loose though, I suppose it could be done in our trailer.

I have been on a trailer ride w/ my friend who had her horse lose in a 2horse stock trailer BP. And you could feel when the horse was turning around in the back.
I think its MUCH safer if you haul loose in a gooseneck rather than BP.

TheOrangeOne
Nov. 19, 2009, 11:12 PM
I have one horse and a 2 horse trailer, so I pulled the divider out and cross tie him in there. He usually ends up riding at a bit of an angle, but I find that he steps on himself and kicks the walls a lot less with the extra room to move around.

4Martini
Nov. 20, 2009, 12:00 AM
I haul my horse only loose in a 2h slant bp with the divider removed and him loose. I can't feel him moving around at all. I do have a 3/4 diesel for pulling and a really good weight distributing hitch. I've never had a problem- and he will load in this trailer unlike any other. It's also great since he's not a reliable tier to be able to leave him in his personal box stall at a show or clinic that doesn't have stabling. He's perfectly happy to hang out look out the windows on one side- turn around and look out the windows on the other side. I feel safer going to the bathroom with him inside the trailer than I would with a horse tied to the outside of a trailer. No one's dog can run up and mess with him, he's free to turn around and look if he hears a noise.

I don't think I could handle showing without this solution. His old owner used to traq him to travel.

foggybok
Nov. 23, 2009, 04:21 PM
I have a 2+ 1 gooseneck and for just hauling two horses, I LOVE the box stall option. One of my horses is a real pain in that he can take off his halter and turn around in a slant load and has proven that too many times.... With a box stall, he is free to ride any way he likes :)

MunchkinsMom
Nov. 23, 2009, 07:21 PM
I'm interested in more information on this topic, as I have a younger gelding that has had issues in the past due to one bad trailer loading incident.

If you have a two horse BP with dressing room, and take out ALL the dividers, and leave them loose, how do you raise the ramp? Do you let the horse face the ramp as you raise it? Or is it possible to get some sort of gate installed that the ramp would close over, meaing close the gate first, then raise the ramp?

ponygirl
Nov. 24, 2009, 09:43 AM
I'm interested in more information on this topic, as I have a younger gelding that has had issues in the past due to one bad trailer loading incident.

If you have a two horse BP with dressing room, and take out ALL the dividers, and leave them loose, how do you raise the ramp? Do you let the horse face the ramp as you raise it? Or is it possible to get some sort of gate installed that the ramp would close over, meaing close the gate first, then raise the ramp?

When I did this, I had 1 butt bar that went the width of the trailer.

TrotTrotPumpkn
Nov. 24, 2009, 01:25 PM
I would only modify a two horse straight load IF the manufacturer says that it is a safe and viable option. I would think the manufacturer would have a good idea for the ramp question too?

I know Brenderups, for example, need the center divider. The center divider may be important for the integrity of the structure. Also, the doors may not be designed for a horse leaning on them (as stated above), etc.

Tiki
Nov. 24, 2009, 03:24 PM
Horses are pretty flexible. They can turn themselves into a pretzel to scratch the back of their hock with their teeth. I used to have a 17.3h horse who could easily turn around in an 8' long by 7' wide box in my box stall trailer. I have a Custom Fab that I designed myself. It is a step-up in the back with a ramp on the side. The center door has a walk through door. I can have access to each horse (or multiples - which I have done) and I can load or unload each horse independently. I'm a breeder and it's the ONLY way to haul mares and foals. I ALWAYS haul them loose. They all hop right on by themselves. If I haul 2, I put the hay nets in the middle and they usually ride nose to nose - one facing front and one facing back - usually on a slight diagonal. I don't think an elephant could get out of my trailer. Very strongly built with pins and latches - depending on the door. There's also a people slider in the back door. I love, love, love this trailer - a GN. I used to have a BP stock trailer and hauled one of my horses loose in it one day. I got up to an absolute max of 40 mph and it was swaying and fishtailing all over the road. Found a safe place to stop to see what was going on. The horse was crosswise against the back door dozing away. That weight distribution in a BP was a disaster. Had to go in and tie him up front. Never, ever had that happen with a GN. Would NEVER have another BP.

wildlifer
Nov. 24, 2009, 04:32 PM
I would only modify a two horse straight load IF the manufacturer says that it is a safe and viable option. I would think the manufacturer would have a good idea for the ramp question too?

I know Brenderups, for example, need the center divider. The center divider may be important for the integrity of the structure. Also, the doors may not be designed for a horse leaning on them (as stated above), etc.

This is VERY important! Horse trailers were designed to be used THE WAY THEY WERE DESIGNED TO BE USED. The design distributes weight correctly over the axle so the trailer will haul safely. If a trailer was not designed with hauling loose horses in mind, then you should not modify it to do so and expect engineering magic to occur -- it could get ugly in a hurry!

buschkn
Nov. 25, 2009, 02:47 PM
I have a BP stock trailer with a divider in the center that I use as 2 box stalls. I usually tie them but have also hauled them loose without any problems. I do think if you put one loose at the back, with no weight in front, you could end up with the problem mentioned above. GN would be better, but I haven't had problems with my BP in this way. They love to big open design.

MunchkinsMom
Nov. 25, 2009, 03:59 PM
I would only modify a two horse straight load IF the manufacturer says that it is a safe and viable option. I would think the manufacturer would have a good idea for the ramp question too?



Good point, although one of the features of my trailer is that all the dividers are easily removed, so I don't think that it is part of the structural integrity of the trailer. I currently have them all out and sitting in an empty stall in the barn.

And lucky for me, the factory is one town over, so I can call and get information, and see if they can come up with a way to rig a single butt bar.

Adding it to my list of things to do while on vacation.

Wanted to add, I would not haul him loose, he will be tied facing front. I'm just trying to get him over his fear of the tight space. The end goal is to get him back to loading and traveling fine with the dividers in place.

Fancy That
Nov. 27, 2009, 12:53 PM
I have a GN custom-made Turnbow 2.5 horse stock/slant combo with large dressing room and sleeping quarters.

Was made to haul 17+ hand Hannovarians :) Specifically, broodmares - so the ".5" was for a mare with a foal together.

We removed the second divider, as we don't need 3 'stalls'. I've always considered just opening the one divider to let a horse ride loose, but it has a ramp and without a very hefty "butt bar" type of thing....it's dangerous to open the ramp up for unloading.

So I've only tied in ours. I love love love my trailer, but if I had to do it over, I'd get a 2+1 :)