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ss3777
Nov. 17, 2009, 05:25 PM
Hi all,


So I am starting to do research into a 3-4 horse trailer or stock trailer. I have only owned 2 horse BPs. I have the truck, F350 diesel, now I need the bigger trailer. So I am trying to research the ups and downs of stock vs. horse, BP vs GN, all aluminum vs steel frame A skin, side ramps, no ramps, slant loads, straight loads, combos......etc etc. I am on a budget, will need to be able to haul a bigger horse and I am in the northeast. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!! I have until 2010 spring to decide.

Many thanks to the mighty minds of COTH BB in advance ;)

Susan

DD_TrailerMan
Nov. 17, 2009, 09:21 PM
How will you use the trailer? How often? All things being equal, my personal preference is a gooseneck over a BP if you have plenty of truck (which you do). Being in the harsh climate of the northeast, you have to consider the salty roads and the cold. I have included more info and questions in a PM to you...

Bartley Heath
bartley@DoubleDTrailers.com
Buy Factory Direct at DoubleDTrailers.com

SLW
Nov. 18, 2009, 11:19 AM
Stock trailers can be okay but remember they are designed for livestock of all types and not typically with the unique needs of a horse in mind. With a larger horse you would need a taller one as they normally run 6' to 6'5" high.

My own trailer is a 2 horse GN, slant load made by Titan. It is all metal and has held up very well for 5 years. The rear tack is collapable which is a must, IMO. The walkthrough door from the horse compartment to the DR is also a must.

Good luck and have fun, there are a ton of great horse trailers out there!

monalisa
Nov. 22, 2009, 08:29 AM
I have a 2-horse GN 4-Star that I bought new in 2001. It has a side ramp, stainless steel exterior (part of it anyway) and I LOVE it. Did a lot of research before buying it and clearly got exactly what I wanted. I would recommend a GN over a BP and would not go stock if you have to haul in cold weather in the NE. Would think in this economy that you might be able to find a very good deal on a used one. I could sell mine today for more than I paid for it in 2001. Good luck!

Renae
Nov. 22, 2009, 10:17 AM
Gooseneck and for hauling horses of multiple sizes and the versatility of it I would look for a 4 horse head to head or a 2+1. The H2H will give you a little more storage room as you can usually put hay or trunks in the aisle between the horses, sometimes you can even put a 5th horse or pony there.

I like having a divider between each horse in the trailer. I would not use a stock trailer as when you put two horses in a space you don't have a divdier between them.

I prefer straight stalls or the "box" stall you get in the front of a 2+1 or center of a H2H over slant stalls because most of the time slant stalls are too small for large horses and you end up having to use a double stall in a slant trailer for the really big horses to fit.

And I really like H2Hs for being able to get at any horse I want and get them out first without having to unload any of the others.

Bluey
Nov. 22, 2009, 10:34 AM
I have several friends that have trailer businesses, from making them locally, not a national brand, but redoing other brands also, to selling all kinds.

The preference of most buyers today, across the disciplines, as an average of horse trailers built and sold, seem to be first gooseneck, as it is definitively safer to pull and second stock trailer.
For those not into the pure horse trailer with tack and/or living quarters, stocktrailers carry the day.

Stock trailers can be used for all kinds of hauling, some can have divisions you can arrange in any one way for horses as boxes or slants, etc.
Stock trailers are the most versatile, tend to cost considerably less and have the best resale value.

Now, those are generalities.
You should keep your needs in mind first, because when it comes to you and your horses, you need to get what will work best in your situation, average will not be good enough.

Touchstone Farm
Nov. 22, 2009, 04:11 PM
I have a 3-horse, slant load GN, Featherlite (all aluminum) with LQs. I really like it. Have owned FLs for 20 years. My first was a 2-horse BP, then switched to a 3-horse GN and now mu current one. Much prefer the GN!!!) I would also look at Four Stars.

My horses range in size from foals to 17 H warmbloods. I have full-size doors on the back with a ramp that closes up over the doors. It's the only way I'd go. I feel that makes two barriers to prevent horses from falling out and extra protection from vehicles ramming me from behind. (And after a friend's horse fell out of a Kieffer trailer with defective doors, I really like the idea of the ramp closing up and over it. Double security.)

No mangers. Don't like the idea of horses crawling up into them. (Happened to a friend's horse. Not a pretty picture.)

There are only two things I wish I would have gotten:
* An escape door at the front of the third stall (the one closest to the truck). I usually am hauling two horses and use that third stall for storing hay and equipment. IF you do that, get the removable "stud gate". This piece comes on and off the bottom of the divider so things can't slide under it into the stall where your horse is standing.
* An electric jack. It's 100 turns for me on the "easy" setting to get my trailer up and off the hitch (or 25 if it's on the harder but faster setting...but I have to put my body weight on the handle to get it around!).

Good luck with your search!

092556
Nov. 23, 2009, 11:08 PM
I have a 1988 Gooseneck 4 Star Alum. Stock trailer that I bought used in 1989, plan on having it another 20 years. Love it.

Guilherme
Nov. 23, 2009, 11:33 PM
Hi all,


So I am starting to do research into a 3-4 horse trailer or stock trailer. I have only owned 2 horse BPs. I have the truck, F350 diesel, now I need the bigger trailer. So I am trying to research the ups and downs of stock vs. horse, BP vs GN, all aluminum vs steel frame A skin, side ramps, no ramps, slant loads, straight loads, combos......etc etc. I am on a budget, will need to be able to haul a bigger horse and I am in the northeast. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!! I have until 2010 spring to decide.

Many thanks to the mighty minds of COTH BB in advance ;)

Susan

Brand-wise I'm on Featherlight Number Three. I vote with my $$$. :cool:

It was a 4H GN and had a finished dressing room and mid-tack when we bought it. We removed the wall and now have a "weekender" LQ that is OK for us.

If I had it to do over again, I'd get a "stock type" horse box. In the South the enemy is heat and if we load four it gets kind of warm even with windows down, open, vents set, etc.

On the other hand the enclosed box does make it easier on long trips where we're only hauling two horses (and that's most of the trips).

We've got a roof rack and that's nice on long trips as I can haul the hay I need and don't have to worry about availability, quality, chaning hay types, etc.

Having owned straight load and slant load I really have no preference; it's what you like. It's my opinion that the horses might ride easier in a slant load as they can use the walls to brace against trailer movement.

No mangers; we use hay bags. This costs storage space but might reduce risk of equine injury (as noted above).

AL is lighter but may give away a small measure of durability over steel. On the other hand it's much lighter and corrosion resistant.

I'm very satisfied with the Featherlight and our configuration. :)

G.

ss3777
Nov. 24, 2009, 09:15 PM
Thanks everyone!! I will definitely give the FL and the 4 Star hard looks. I love the idea of the versatility of a stock trailer. I will measure my current BPs height and width, it is an extra tall/wide model and the horses love it. Has anyone else noticed that the closer you get to the northeast the higher the prices get?

Would appreciate any further advice/feedback :)

Nipntuck
Nov. 25, 2009, 08:50 AM
One concern I have with an all aluminum floor is the maintenance required by the manufacturers to avoid voiding the warranty. When I sold my 1979 two horse trailer a few years ago the original wood floor was still in excellent shape, with very little care on my part. I swept the poop out after every ride. I bought a 2+1 Hawk and opted for a wood floor, which has a better warranty than the rumber option. Realistically, I am not going to pull mats every time I trailer, especially with a large trailer.

As was said above, I wouldn't have mangers. An electric jack would be nice, maybe some day I will see about adding one. :) A lot of the other options end up being personal preference.

Guilherme
Nov. 25, 2009, 10:16 AM
One concern I have with an all aluminum floor is the maintenance required by the manufacturers to avoid voiding the warranty. When I sold my 1979 two horse trailer a few years ago the original wood floor was still in excellent shape, with very little care on my part. I swept the poop out after every ride. I bought a 2+1 Hawk and opted for a wood floor, which has a better warranty than the rumber option. Realistically, I am not going to pull mats every time I trailer, especially with a large trailer.

As was said above, I wouldn't have mangers. An electric jack would be nice, maybe some day I will see about adding one. :) A lot of the other options end up being personal preference.

We don't do the "clean the trailer after every trip" thing. The trailer is now seven years old with no signs of problems.

Thank you for mentioning the electric jack!!! :) We put one on last year and I'm kind of "kicking" myself for not having done it sooner. It makes life with a trailer SO much nicer.

Now all we have to do is "automate" the awning. :lol:

G.