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gold2012
Nov. 16, 2009, 08:42 PM
Help.

I need some ideas to develop a canter in two seperate horses. I want a canter short, and very uphill and in hand. Suggestions for exercises?

Background on horses:
1....TB, 8, hot, has a ginormous natural stride, and can jump naturally out of it, like it was a small stride. Too much leg can get him really hot. Goes uphill pretty good, but just getting that smaller stride can be hugely difficult.

2. Downhill 17.2 ISH. Way built downhill with long neck. Kinda just wants to go around on his forehand like western pleasure horse. He is harder, just due to his build.

Thanks....I got two months....am hoping that some of the previous work will just click, and we will be doing well...but need some more ideas.

Rainier
Nov. 17, 2009, 02:01 AM
I have found that canter poles placed in a line at about 9' apart, ultimately raised alternately at opposite ends, is a great way to develop that pouncy fluffy uphill canter. Start out with 3 or 4 and work up to 6-8. Its hard work for them, but really helps the canter that you want to have for stadium.

GleeRider
Nov. 17, 2009, 06:34 AM
Help.

I need some ideas to develop a canter in two seperate horses. I want a canter short, and very uphill and in hand. Suggestions for exercises?

Background on horses:
1....TB, 8, hot, has a ginormous natural stride, and can jump naturally out of it, like it was a small stride. Too much leg can get him really hot. Goes uphill pretty good, but just getting that smaller stride can be hugely difficult.

2. Downhill 17.2 ISH. Way built downhill with long neck. Kinda just wants to go around on his forehand like western pleasure horse. He is harder, just due to his build.

Thanks....I got two months....am hoping that some of the previous work will just click, and we will be doing well...but need some more ideas.


For both of them i would definitely suggest doing spiral down circles at both the canter and trot. Starting out at a full 20 meter then leg yielding inward and staying on that size circle, then moving inward a little bit more and so on, then down to a 10 meter circle and slowly leg yielding back out again. It's a great exercise for a lot of things including making the horses really connected with the outside rein but most importantly it really gets their hind end moving and gives them something to focus on. I think this will help with the first horse because it really forces them to slow their step and pay attention to where their feet are going and relax. And at the canter it makes them jump more in the canter and use their whole body and at the small circle especially. Then just try to keep that in the bigger circle. Good luck! :)

vbunny
Nov. 17, 2009, 08:59 PM
Small tip for horse 1 - sometimes if they have a naturally organized stride that just gets big and energetic if you can just soften and dissipate some of the energy you can get a much more maneuverable canter. Courtesy of Jimmy Wofford ;). Maybe see if while you work you can get him to just take it down a peg and not put so much into it.

Blugal
Nov. 17, 2009, 09:05 PM
Don't forget to work transitions within the canter, so that you are developing the horse's muscles and mind as well as his "short bouncy canter".

ACMEeventing
Nov. 17, 2009, 09:38 PM
I like gymnastics grids to encourage that canter:

Grid #1 is trot poles (4 feet apart) to bounce - bounce - bounce - 1 stride. (bounces are 10 feet jump cup to jump cup)

Grid #2 is canter-in to a spacing pole 9 feet from a vertical, place another canter pole 9 feet from vertical to another vertical 9 feet later, etc. The result is 4 verticals with a placing pole 9 feet before and after.
Bounc-a-licious! :yes:

lstevenson
Nov. 17, 2009, 10:29 PM
Don't forget to work transitions within the canter, so that you are developing the horse's muscles and mind as well as his "short bouncy canter".


This and canter/walk/canter transitions. Or half turn on the haunches, canter, walk, half turn on the haunches, canter the other way, repeat.

cyberbay
Nov. 18, 2009, 07:36 PM
I'd focus more on the flat work than jumping to get the bouncy stride, since you are wanting, I would guess?, to have your horse come back into an energized packed canter stride -- so, that means he has to listen to your aids while cantering, not using a jump to make that so?

Anyhow, transitions, to basically repeat what others have mentioned, within the gait are a good way to do that. Canter fwd, then bring him back into that desired bouncy canter -- or, as close as he can get without overfacing him initially -- then back up to fwd, then bring him back down again. A 20m circle can help with this, but he should be able to do this on a straight line, as this what you'll be facing on course...

bornfreenowexpensive
Nov. 18, 2009, 08:28 PM
This and canter/walk/canter transitions. Or half turn on the haunches, canter, walk, half turn on the haunches, canter the other way, repeat.


Exercise from Frank Chapot expanded on this. walk, turn on haunches, as you get almost around pick up the counter canter from the walk. Hold counter canter around the short end of the ring and when back on the long side walk a few steps to turn on the haunches to counter canter etc....repeat, repeat, repeat.

warning...much be ridden correctly (not tons of hand) and the horse ready for it. Not something to do if they are really green.

ACMEeventing
Nov. 18, 2009, 11:15 PM
I'd focus more on the flat work than jumping to get the bouncy stride, since you are wanting, I would guess?, to have your horse come back into an energized packed canter stride -- so, that means he has to listen to your aids while cantering, not using a jump to make that so?

Anyhow, transitions, to basically repeat what others have mentioned, within the gait are a good way to do that. Canter fwd, then bring him back into that desired bouncy canter -- or, as close as he can get without overfacing him initially -- then back up to fwd, then bring him back down again. A 20m circle can help with this, but he should be able to do this on a straight line, as this what you'll be facing on course...

True Dat.

The gridwork just helps strengthen the muscles that are needed to compress into that bouncy canter. Also helps the rider feel the horse really coming under in order to duplicate it on the flat.

Bounce on!