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View Full Version : Selling conundrum: WWYD?



WNT
Nov. 15, 2009, 05:49 PM
How can you effectively market a competition horse when you can't afford or have time to take it competitions?

Little background, I'd been hoping to keep my older T/P gelding but financially is not going to happen, even with working off most of board. I took him to a small unrecognized event and he was so excited to be there, he was a bit over-enthusiastic. If he shows regularly, it's a hum-drum thing for him. I can't afford to show him enough to make it hum-drum again, but he'll be too excited without getting to go out enough to make it boring again. Ack!

WWYD? Any opinions?

JeanieClarke2141
Nov. 15, 2009, 06:02 PM
I'd sell him without competing him. A good XC school and regular good riding will show him to good advantage when people come to try him, and his past competitioon record will speak for itself.

Since he's an older guy, his age, the time of year, and the economy will set your price ceiling rather than his lack of recent events. Save your money.

Leasing him for the winter season or sending him south to compete with someone's working student might look cheap, but it's a big risk. My guess is it would not raise his sale value enough to be worth it.

Good luck - sorry you'll have to sell him!

Jleegriffith
Nov. 15, 2009, 07:00 PM
WNT- I would say your horses record at training and prelim should speak for his ability without having to compete him. I understand not having the funds to go back out and get him started back up again but luckily he does have a record to stand on. I would just write as honest as an ad as possible and see what you get. I think there are many people that understand a situation like yours and while your horse might have to be a bit cheaper he should still be very marketable in my opinion.

I find selling horses with a competition record even from a year or two ago is much easier than selling a prospect. I would also send an email to all the local pro's in your area about your horse as they might have students that are good enough riders for a horse like him.

Meredith Clark
Nov. 15, 2009, 07:11 PM
Come from a buyers prospective (not that I'm in the market for a horse but I'm more often a buyer than a seller!) It wouldn't bother me if a Training/Prelim horse wasn't currently competing.

As long as you could prove his soundness- that would be the first reason I'd assume you're selling him and not competing - it wouldn't make a difference to me how often he competes and I'd be happy to buy him for a bit cheaper than a horse that is currently competing or in training.

make sense?