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birdsong
Nov. 14, 2009, 10:21 AM
In Fl we are just planting our gardens. After the sandy disaster of a last minute garden last year I spent the summer moving manure to the plot in preparation.

Some of it is not yet broken down and not sure the rest really composted completely. With thoughts of bacteria and ecoli my question is...Is my garden safe to plant?

Thanks to all.

JSwan
Nov. 14, 2009, 10:24 AM
Yes.

deltawave
Nov. 14, 2009, 04:31 PM
Yes. Use normal good sense in washing hands after working in the garden, clean your produce before you eat it, and you will be way better off in terms of potential pathogens, more than likely, than if you were eating stuff from the grocery store. :)

Alagirl
Nov. 14, 2009, 05:28 PM
Yes. Use normal good sense in washing hands after working in the garden, clean your produce before you eat it, and you will be way better off in terms of potential pathogens, more than likely, than if you were eating stuff from the grocery store. :)


Sad but, true. Not to mention that the germs are home grown, you may actually have a resistance build up to them already (that's the poop you shovel from the barn, you know, maybe picked up with your hands....:yes:)

twofatponies
Nov. 14, 2009, 05:36 PM
Besides, you don't put fresh manure on a garden (it burns the plants) - you let it rot to black "potting soil" first, then apply it (or apply it to fallow beds, let sit a season, then use the bed). The transformation of the manure into composted manure takes it yet another step further from "poop." By the time you use it it's more like dirt.

birdsong
Nov. 14, 2009, 05:44 PM
Besides, you don't put fresh manure on a garden (it burns the plants) - you let it rot to black "potting soil" first, then apply it (or apply it to fallow beds, let sit a season, then use the bed). The transformation of the manure into composted manure takes it yet another step further from "poop." By the time you use it it's more like dirt.


Thanks guys for the info. Actaully my profession for 30 years was growing ornamentals but you don't eat them..:lol:

I am knowledgable with composting but I know this might not have completely broken down yet. The summers are so sopping wet that I had to keep it covered or it would have washed away!
I have been turning it though into my "non-soil" which is nothing more than sugar sand with NO bacteria. OK ...we'll see what happens.
Saw a blurb about the lettuce farm in Ca. where the E coli was traced to . I believe it said that it had come from wild hogs. Thats what made me start thinking.

starkissed
Nov. 14, 2009, 07:03 PM
yeah you should be fine.
I usually this time of year pile up the garden with manure. I get it straight from the pile, dig down a little bit, but not really 'composted' (although our pile get's removed once a year!). It has straw and bits of old manure. I don't worry about it.
It sits there for several months over the winter and it's great by spring!

twofatponies
Nov. 14, 2009, 07:45 PM
Maybe a bad idea, but I actually make a point of not being pristine about washing my hands at the barn - I figure I might pick up something beneficial - probiotics ya know? ;)

Grew up with a garden - at out of it all summer. We rotated fallow beds where we buried our household food waste (non-meat) and manure from a local dairy farm. Never got sick from eating the lettuce, berries, etc straight out of the garden without washing it first, even.

JSwan
Nov. 14, 2009, 10:01 PM
\
I have been turning it though into my "non-soil" which is nothing more than sugar sand with NO bacteria.


You probably already know this but I'll write it anyway. Don't be frustrated or disappointed if your soil doesn't become productive right away.

With really "bad" soil, it can take several years to really build up really good soil. And it can continue to improve over the years if you manage it well. It may just take time.

You can do things like soil tests (even using an over the counter testing kit works great), dumping leaves into your compost, fireplace ash, lime, etc.

Compost is like a Pot Au Feu. A bit of this, a dash of that, a dollop or two of all kinds of things - mix - cook down - and voila.

Doesn't have to be perfect - just lots of things thrown together and blended. :)

ETA - Feral hogs are nasty little critters.

Alagirl
Nov. 15, 2009, 12:13 PM
you can also check local restaurants and grocery stores if they are willing to save the coffe grounds and salad leftovers to compost, some eggshells are good too.

Mix with manure and pile high! :cool:

Speeds the process of soil building a great deal, and don't rejects leaves....I am near tears when I see them burned in my neighborhood, but I just don't have the time atm to devote myself to that task.