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RacetrackReject
Nov. 11, 2009, 12:37 PM
Are there specific rules or regulations about crossing state lines with hay?

I am asking because I plan on going into the next state over to pick up some hay, about 100 bales, and someone mentioned that I needed to check into the regulations about doing such. I googled but didn't really find much, so I came to the only place I could think of where people would know the answer =).

The states involved are Louisiana and Texas if that makes a difference.


Thanks!

goodhors
Nov. 11, 2009, 01:22 PM
Get in contact with the Dept of Agriculture. I am sure there are rules, but don't know what they would be.

I do know a number of folks hauling north a couple seasons ago, were unpleasantly surprised when they got stopped and turned back or forced to make other accomodations for the uninspected hay. There was much concern about hay that contained blister beetles heading north, contaminating new states.

I know folks haul without papers on their hay, same as no health papers on their horses when crossing state lines. It is a PITA to jump thru the hoops, then appear to never have been noticed anyway. Still, the ease of mind in doing it right is best for all. Better to find out ahead, have the papers you need, than be stopped and hit with big fines for hauling uninspected hay. Hay with bad stuff in it, never inspected, is how pests get spread.

Maybe Tamara in Tenn could give you other places to check for Ag regulations.

Tamara in TN
Nov. 11, 2009, 01:29 PM
Are there specific rules or regulations about crossing state lines with hay?
The states involved are Louisiana and Texas if that makes a difference.
Thanks!



yes there are actually if you are going from a fire ant infestation to a non fire ant area and taking hay with you....

the farm you buy it from must be on record as being fire ant storage compliant or they will turn your butt around...the station at I-40 Memphis did it all last year...you need the number of the ag checking station on your route for either state and ask them about transporting hay...the Dept of Ag in either state can get you that number....can you dodge them ? sure but there is hell to pay if they catch you;)

goodhors
Nov. 11, 2009, 04:17 PM
Thanks Tamara. It WAS fire ants, not blister beetles, heading north.

Go Fish
Nov. 12, 2009, 02:48 PM
Years ago, my parents used to sell alfalfa to Japan. You wanna talk about jumping through hoops!

moonriverfarm
Nov. 12, 2009, 02:59 PM
It's getting difficult to haul anything these days!

RiverBendPol
Nov. 15, 2009, 03:38 PM
Holy mackerel, that never even occurred to me. I hauled 2 trailer loads of home grown Maine hay to Aiken last winter for my own use, am doing the same this winter. Do I have to get inspected?????? Horrors!

Meredith Clark
Nov. 15, 2009, 07:06 PM
I buy my hay in PA and live in MD. Not huge loads and not on main highways. I never thought to check rules!

fivehorses
Nov. 15, 2009, 07:10 PM
I guess I can join the list of those non compliant...NYS to NH.
Maybe its a northeast thing that we don't think about it???

tabula rashah
Nov. 16, 2009, 08:21 AM
LOL! I guess this could make me non-compliant ridiculously often, since when I cross my back yard I am in a different state.

Daydream Believer
Nov. 16, 2009, 08:45 AM
I would not breeze past Florida's Ag. Inspection stations at the border without stopping! They will run you down...don't ask me how I know. Now I was hauling an empty horse trailer when that happened (and I just got a warning) but all tractor trailers have to stop and declare their load. Horse trailers will be inspected and paperwork checked. I've had less trouble getting on a military base than getting into Florida with a horse trailer.

Tamara in TN
Nov. 16, 2009, 10:47 AM
I guess I can join the list of those non compliant...NYS to NH.
Maybe its a northeast thing that we don't think about it???



the concern is mainly that you do not bring critters from an infected area to a not yet infected area...

so a Maine to SC trip would not be a big drama...hauling hay from a place in SC that had fire ants and was not storage compliant, to Maine could cause the little bastards to fall off any place in between and start new nests...

it is the same way that the pine tree beetles spread along major interstates and haul roads and ending up killing millions of trees...

anyway do your part when you buy hay...ask (or get out the map) and see if fire ants are there at the farm where it was grown (even buying at a feed store mind you)
and ask if the facility FA compliant....otherwise you are helping spread them to a pasture near you;)

fivehorses
Nov. 16, 2009, 06:44 PM
good info as always tamara. thanks.

Calvincrowe
Nov. 17, 2009, 12:14 AM
Up here in rainland, you need to use certified weed-free hay when hauling into the backcountry now--to hunt or trail ride for example. Mucho expensivo. And they do check at trailheads I understand. Thank goodness we don't have fire ants! They scare me.

BrookdaleBay
Nov. 17, 2009, 01:38 AM
My BO regularly hauls hay from NE Ontario to Ocala and Wellington for the winter show season, and never has a problem at the border.

Zu Zu
Nov. 17, 2009, 08:54 AM
Never have encounter any problem with transporting hay across any state lines. Thanks for starting this thread - valuable information.

Valentina_32926
Nov. 17, 2009, 10:50 AM
I would not breeze past Florida's Ag. Inspection stations at the border without stopping! They will run you down...don't ask me how I know. Now I was hauling an empty horse trailer when that happened (and I just got a warning) but all tractor trailers have to stop and declare their load. Horse trailers will be inspected and paperwork checked. I've had less trouble getting on a military base than getting into Florida with a horse trailer.

Yup - was passing a Florida Ag station with horses going to a (Florida) show and one of their Ag guys followed me for many miles. No lights on his car so I didn't pull over.

RacetrackReject
Nov. 18, 2009, 05:02 PM
Thanks guys! I did call the Texas Dept of Ag and they said there is some regulation about fire ants, but since the hay was coming from and through a fire ant quarantine area to a fire ant quarantine area, I would be fine. I live pretty close the LA border. If I lived deeper into Texas then I would have to have a certificate for the hay.

moonriverfarm
Nov. 18, 2009, 05:16 PM
Where is FL does one need to worry about all of this? Cuz i have sold 3 horses who went down from AL to FL and the way we go, you don't pass any ag stations.....barely even a gas station at the line!

CarolinaGirl
Nov. 18, 2009, 05:48 PM
Where is FL does one need to worry about all of this? Cuz i have sold 3 horses who went down from AL to FL and the way we go, you don't pass any ag stations.....barely even a gas station at the line!

My guess would be they are going down I-95. That's the only way I've ever gone into FL and yes there is a major station there lol.

Daydream Believer
Nov. 18, 2009, 07:21 PM
Yes, I was on I95. It was a PITA...you have to stop both going in and out of the state. We did stop (voluntarily) on our way home with the mare and it was a fairly tedious procedure to check her coggins and health papers. He even went and looked at her and her markings.

I would imagine on some back roads you would not get stopped.

CarolinaGirl...our cop had lights on his car. Scared me half to death seeing him my mirror! He was a funny guy and the next day when we were headed home, he was at the Ag Station and said he thought he recognized our rig! No hard feelings and we gabbed a bit while the other guy did all sorts of things with my horse's health papers.

tuppysmom
Nov. 18, 2009, 10:43 PM
We recently returned home from our annual fall trip. We hauled roughly 7,600 miles, crossed thru, or stopped in 15 states. We stopped at EVERY single Port Of Entry and/or weigh station. We had on board: horses, hay, grain, water, CDL licensed drivers and non CDL licensed driver.

Wyoming wanted confirmation that we would not be unloading any horses or feed in their state. No other state asked any questions.

We spent plenty of time and money to get all the CDLs, health certificates, loaded only certified feeds, and no enforcement people even asked to see any of it. The states that gave us trouble last year didn't even look at us other than to weigh the rig as went thru the station.

I am not complaining, though, they gave us enough trouble last year to make up for it.

I do think that the weigh stations had a better idea of what rules applied to horse trailers and which did not apply.

tuppysmom
Nov. 18, 2009, 10:49 PM
Oh yes, Here is a list of Interstates that we travelled.

I70, I80, I64, I75, I40, I95, I76, and state hiways to numerous to remember.