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View Full Version : Fence chargers...ARRRGGGGGG!



mlranchtx
Nov. 10, 2009, 09:20 AM
I'm tired of "cheap" fence chargers.

Ok, I didn't think $200(+/-) was cheap but apparently they are because I've had more trouble with them then I thought possible. I have these:

http://www.tractorsupply.com/electric-fencing/electric-fence-controllers/electric-fence-ac-controllers/zareba-low-impedance-100-mile-fencer-3604497

http://www.tractorsupply.com/electric-fencing/electric-fence-controllers/electric-fence-solar-powered-controllers/zareba-reg-6-volt-solar-operated-fencer-10-miles-3616266

I have had the electric one repaired once, for $160 but I figured it was cheaper than buying a new one. The solar one died, I bought a new battery and that apparently wasn't the problem. Geeeezzzzzzzzzz!

Now the electric one suddenly is putting out about 1/3 of it's normal "zap" so something is wrong again. The solar one sits dead in my barn.

I've checked fences and nothing's grounding it out. It's grounded properly. I just have no idea what happened.

What's a better brand to try? I'm tired of having them worked on once a year or so.

I also don't really need two anymore so I'm willing to get one GOOD one that plugs in. The solar thing just isn't my style.

Hilary
Nov. 10, 2009, 09:24 AM
I have 2 Parmak chargers. One is 10 years old and still going strong, and one of the horses tried to dismantle it once - she didn't succeed.

They were no more than $200.

Robin@DHH
Nov. 10, 2009, 02:16 PM
We've got about 10 miles of fence (that is easier than you think
to amass) and we went through several fencers. Finally, we
bought a Zareba rated for 100 miles of fence. It came with
a lightning arrester. This one has kept working for several
years. And the company will stand behind their equipment;
I have not sent one for repairs but a friend who did was
sent a remanufactured one free since the company felt
it should not have failed.

Tom King
Nov. 10, 2009, 02:19 PM
http://www.stafix.com/cyclic_wave.asp

jcotton
Nov. 13, 2009, 08:19 PM
My favorite is Gallagher and it is electric rather than solar.

secretariat
Nov. 13, 2009, 08:57 PM
Only solar/battery charger that we've found to work is Parmak 12v. No luck with 6v or smaller.

coloredhorse
Nov. 13, 2009, 09:08 PM
Ditto on the big Parmak. Loff mine! Rigged it to charge my rechargeable leaf blower that I use to clean the barn aisle, too.

GilbertsCreeksideAcres
Nov. 13, 2009, 09:14 PM
When you say "grounded properly," how many grounding rods do you mean? I lost charger after charger until I increased to three rods. No problems now.

KSAQHA
Nov. 13, 2009, 09:36 PM
Just a thought - as long as it's still providing some sort of shock, maybe you don't necessarily need to replace it. I have a Zareba Yellow Jacket charger that charges a front paddock fence. It's old, and although its zap is minimal (we're talking minor rubber band snap) my herd never tests the fence, as horses tend to be much more sensitive to electric shock.

I also use a Fi-Shock XB12 charger on perimeter fencing...for almost 7 years now. It operates on a 12V marine battery (wish the batteries lasted as long as the charger!). It's a deer fence charger and the instructions say "not suitable for use around pets or small children", so it does pack a wallop. ;) I paid under $100.00 for it at the time.

mlranchtx
Nov. 14, 2009, 05:39 PM
When you say "grounded properly," how many grounding rods do you mean? I lost charger after charger until I increased to three rods. No problems now.

It has 2 very long ground rods. I know, I need three, huh? Well, would 4 be better? I might just go to 4 tomorrow.

What does it do to the charger if you don't have 3?

secretariat
Nov. 14, 2009, 06:51 PM
Re: Ground, shouldn't hurt the charger if it's designed well. Poor ground = poor emf = poor shock potential.

goeslikestink
Nov. 14, 2009, 07:47 PM
I'm tired of "cheap" fence chargers.

Ok, I didn't think $200(+/-) was cheap but apparently they are because I've had more trouble with them then I thought possible. I have these:

http://www.tractorsupply.com/electric-fencing/electric-fence-controllers/electric-fence-ac-controllers/zareba-low-impedance-100-mile-fencer-3604497

http://www.tractorsupply.com/electric-fencing/electric-fence-controllers/electric-fence-solar-powered-controllers/zareba-reg-6-volt-solar-operated-fencer-10-miles-3616266

I have had the electric one repaired once, for $160 but I figured it was cheaper than buying a new one. The solar one died, I bought a new battery and that apparently wasn't the problem. Geeeezzzzzzzzzz!

Now the electric one suddenly is putting out about 1/3 of it's normal "zap" so something is wrong again. The solar one sits dead in my barn.

I've checked fences and nothing's grounding it out. It's grounded properly. I just have no idea what happened.

What's a better brand to try? I'm tired of having them worked on once a year or so.

I also don't really need two anymore so I'm willing to get one GOOD one that plugs in. The solar thing just isn't my style.

has it got a ground rod- you need to earth it if it has - tip a bucket of water down where the rod is obviously turn it off 1st then tip the water where the ground rod is - then wait a couple mins then turn it on

Frank B
Nov. 15, 2009, 09:10 AM
"Adequate" grounding depends on the soil conductivity. Download this manual (http://www.parmakusa.com/Install/Parmak_Energizer_Booklet_English.pdf) and pay particular attention to the sections detailing grounding around page four.

A good ground not only enhances the *zap* factor, but increases the probability of surviving a nearby lightning strike. An external lightning arrestor is also a good idea, especially where thunderstorms are numerous and severe.

Grounding can also be helped by digging a hole around each ground rod (use a posthole digger) about a foot deep and dumping in a few handfulls of Copper Sulfate, then backfilling the hole. Many Vets carry it, as do some electrical supply houses.

ReSomething
Nov. 15, 2009, 10:09 AM
My DH put all his ground rods in such that they were a minimum of 50' from all the phone poles and grounds for the house and barn electrical systems. I skimmed the Parmak manual and did not see this mentioned. I gather those grounds are the "wrong" grounds for the system.

What gets our solar chargers is weed and vegetation growth. We use them for deer and critter control and have a very low wire which may look OK from a distance but up close has dozens of shorts, little blades of grass just touching the wire.