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View Full Version : My horse jumps me out of the tack way too often - how do I fix this?



Beau Peep
Nov. 9, 2009, 01:10 AM
I've never had this happen with any other horse, but this one in particular has a powerful jump, and every time the jump is higher than 2'3" I get launched out of my position.

I used to be a hunter rider so it's really annoying that my equitation is very obviously terribly whenever this happens, not to mention I am terribly discombobulated after the fence. This is particularly problematic when riding a line.

I've just gotten back into jumping, but I haven't made any progress with this issue in the months since I've been back.

Help!!!!!

AppJumpr08
Nov. 9, 2009, 07:15 AM
Shorten your stirrups a hole or two - when my guy was green he jumped me out of the track alllllll the time, so my trainer cranked my stirrups up. Made all the difference in the world. I also rode with a neck strap to grab so I didn't jab him in the mouth by mistake.


Good luck!

retreadeventer
Nov. 9, 2009, 08:00 AM
How many months has it been since you jumped regularly?
Gotta get fixed before it ruins your horse's jump....been there, done that....
Need to tighten up your position, and that only comes with lots of work personally on your leg and seat as well as keeping your hands more independent. Hack w/o stirrups, keep the jumps low and stay in the grids until you can stay with the horse more comfortably. Get good regular instruction so you don't get into trouble on your own. You could be opening up too early or leaning forward and out of position at take off, can't tell without help. Can't train the horse until you train yourself to stay with him, really -- as I say, I have done this myself, so I know how you feel.
It is never easy and it is always hard! Speaking from experience! :)

yellowbritches
Nov. 9, 2009, 08:43 AM
I find that the most common reason people feel like they get jumped loose is that they ride their horse on a dead rhythm, leaving the horse with zero power at the fence, causing the horse to heave himself over, thus creating a "powerful" feeling jump and/or they drop their horse on the take off stride and get the same result.

Analyze how you are riding TO the fence. Are you making a powerful rhythm (not fast, just a GOOD rhythm) and keeping it to the fence? Are you waiting for the correct distance and not dropping and/or leaning for a long one that isn't there? If your horse is getting close, are you supporting him with your legs to help him compress and jump out of it? You'd be surprised how many "powerful" jumpers are actually just kind souls trying their hardest to jump from a nothing rhythm and stride. Once that's fixed, they usually jump very well, but smoothly and more conservatively. :yes:

wildlifer
Nov. 9, 2009, 08:47 AM
Thanks for this topic -- I have been having the same problem and I think Amanda hit the nail on the head for me. I think I am not keeping enough impulsion to the fence and in an effort to soften in his mouth for the jump, am dropping him. I do take lessons, but haven't been able to match up with jump coaches schedule recently and have been trying to puzzle out what I am screwing up!

Beau Peep
Nov. 9, 2009, 11:40 AM
I think it could be a combination of stirrups and approach. My stirrups are probably a hole or two long and my legs might be swinging at the canter as a result.

However, the problem jump this week was in a gymnastic. I have had trouble in the past with being jumped out of the tack due to lack of impulsion, but getting through a gymnastic usually helps me to avoid that situation. Every other jump on the course, though smaller, should have been much easier for me to botch the approach.

asterix
Nov. 9, 2009, 11:46 AM
What about the saddle? Last time I tried a bunch of different saddles I found that one or two really made me FEEL as though I was getting jumped out of the tack...on the exact same horse, same jumps, I was more secure in other saddles.

Not at all disagreeing with other posters with very good thoughts, just wanted to add one more potential factor in...

SkipChange
Nov. 9, 2009, 12:03 PM
What about the saddle? Last time I tried a bunch of different saddles I found that one or two really made me FEEL as though I was getting jumped out of the tack...on the exact same horse, same jumps, I was more secure in other saddles.

Not at all disagreeing with other posters with very good thoughts, just wanted to add one more potential factor in...

This is definitely something to consider.

I think the most important factor is having appropriate stirrup length. Too long and you're going to suffer, trust me, especially as the jumps increase in height. A horse I used to ride in jumpers was a habitual over-jumper. Here is what I did/would recommend:
1. Short stirrups (not talking jockey but if they're even one hole too long it's going to make it 10x harder)
2. The right saddle (switching saddles helped a huuge amount.)
3. Practice no stirrups work (on the flat for now, don't get killed!)
4. Ride him through gymnastics, lots of grid work to work on your position (will be good for him too).
5. Grab mane :D

I totally feel you pain though. It's frustrating when some people don't understand just how hard the horse is jumping under you. This was the horse that caused me problems. Phenomenal jumper though.
http://photos-a.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-sf2p/v215/139/34/1080645412/n1080645412_40410_7769.jpg

fooler
Nov. 9, 2009, 01:13 PM
You have a lot of great pointers to work through. I had to use most all of those with one of my horses in addition to 'waiting' for her to jump. She had a very powerful push and I tended to anticipate. Anticipating & yes jumping ahead put me in an even worse position and made her job all the more difficult - a vicious circle:(.
By waiting & me "staying in the middle of the saddle", She was able to lessen her effort which made the jump better for both of us. Have someone watch you and see if this is an issue or not for you.

pony grandma
Nov. 9, 2009, 04:48 PM
All of the above, esp to shorten the stirrups and learn to wait. Let the horse jump up to you. I'm adding to step into your heel at take-off and on landing -to help tighten your leg and keep it from coming loose and raising up (when some riders go up on their knees). And do the hunter eq thing with sticking your rear end back over the cantle of the saddle to keep you from roaching your back and lifting over the fences (your elbows in) and keep your shoulders over the withers.

Let us know how it goes.

purplnurpl
Nov. 10, 2009, 09:58 AM
It could also be that your horse is just very very nice. lol.

I had to buy a new saddle. One with a thigh and calf block rather than a knee roll.

he was not so 'powerful' off the ground but he uses his back, abbs, neck and shoulder so well that he would come up with such force that he would literally chest me and knock my wind out and yank the reins out of my hands. When he was young I spent many a jump picking my reins back up on the landing.
I really had to learn to close my knee in order to stay on and he taught me a following release--I had no choice but to learn that one.
I also learned to stay very still and close to his center of gravity. And I have to let his body dictate where my position goes.

The more impulsion I give him the worse it is. To stay in the tack I have to let him lope around more huntery than jumpery.

Prestige eventer and sporty haft spray.

A good coach should be able to pin point the problem. It may very well be a strength issue on your part.

before the new saddle:
(I found two pics before and after with comparable poor release on my part--you can see how much the saddle improved my leg position)
http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p189/xckaboom/boom4b.jpg

http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p189/xckaboom/forCOTH.jpg

rugbygirl
Nov. 10, 2009, 10:06 AM
I find that the most common reason people feel like they get jumped loose is that they ride their horse on a dead rhythm, leaving the horse with zero power at the fence, causing the horse to heave himself over, thus creating a "powerful" feeling jump and/or they drop their horse on the take off stride and get the same result.

Nice observation, you just clicked something for me :)

Sometimes this observation is made by less articulate people as "you ride off your hands" which isn't helpful, or 100% accurate. Really, you pull up (usually with the reins) in the last three strides and then get popped out by your honest horse and probably grab his face a little.

Replace "you" in the last paragraph with "I" and you get my last few jumping lessons :D...sometimes even 3" higher changes your attitude and you're back to that beginner "OMG that jump is HUGE." Going back to your basics will never HURT BUT if the problem is really in your mind (like you've hit a plateau at 2'3" and the 2'6" fences are freaking you out) then you may just have to suck it up and actually work the fences.

One thing that my instructor sometimes does when people hit a mental stumbling block like that is put them on another horse and get them running "step up" courses where only the last fence is set to the plateau height.

Samantha37
Nov. 11, 2009, 09:05 AM
Agree with the saddle thing- having knee and thigh blocks definitely help- and love the Sporty Haft Spray!

The poster who mentioned staying in the center of the tack made a good point. That helped me a lot with my really powerful jumping horse. Sitting back and waiting made all of the difference in the world- I would get anxious and jump ever so slightly ahead, and then get popped loose and my back would usually get cracked pretty hard. My trainer told me to think of standing up rather than leaving forward in the air- and the horse could come to me. It helped me keep my shoulders back and stay centered over the horse.

Everyone on here mentioned really helpful tips- most of them helped me with my horse.

Good luck!

bounce
Nov. 13, 2009, 08:21 PM
I lived through this for years with a very powerful little jumper. Saddle Tight became my best friend. Often, when he chose to really bascule over the jump... the top flap of my saddle would ride up. Once on a preliminary XC course in the middle of a bounce where he put in a huge effort, both flaps pushed up and turned wrong side up. I had to stop after the fence, dig the flaps out from under my thighs and then continue on course. Never rode him again without an overgirth or monoflap saddle. Anyway... this little guy is now a huge success in the jumper world :yes: Good luck and give saddle tight a try :winkgrin:

lstevenson
Nov. 14, 2009, 09:27 AM
I find that the most common reason people feel like they get jumped loose is that they ride their horse on a dead rhythm, leaving the horse with zero power at the fence, causing the horse to heave himself over, thus creating a "powerful" feeling jump and/or they drop their horse on the take off stride and get the same result.

Analyze how you are riding TO the fence. Are you making a powerful rhythm (not fast, just a GOOD rhythm) and keeping it to the fence? Are you waiting for the correct distance and not dropping and/or leaning for a long one that isn't there? If your horse is getting close, are you supporting him with your legs to help him compress and jump out of it? You'd be surprised how many "powerful" jumpers are actually just kind souls trying their hardest to jump from a nothing rhythm and stride. Once that's fixed, they usually jump very well, but smoothly and more conservatively. :yes:


YB is very astute. This is a very common cause of the rider feeling like they are jumped out of the tack.

The other being the horse is jumping just fine, but the rider has a weak leg. Working w/o stirrups and lots of time spent in two point getting your weight solidly down in your heels and your leg tight.

sch1star
Nov. 14, 2009, 06:42 PM
Agree, agree. And while you're practicing staying in the middle, be willing to get left behind - if you keep your back soft and slip out your reins, you do no harm.

Some horses' jumping styles are just much more unorthodox than others, and really require adaptation on our parts. My TB can really tuck up and jump a careful four feet, but his head and neck are so low in the air you feel like there is nothing in front of the saddle. Like you I grew up in eq and was out of my depth. I got jumped out of the tack and fell off a whole lot of times before I learned to stay back and in the middle, and steer with my feet on landing, when I needed a little time to reorganize my reins.

As Purpl says - it may be that you have a tremendously talented one on your hands! I am so glad I was gifted with mine - I have learned so much.