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View Full Version : RIP: Annie (Canine Vestibular Disease)



CharliesMom
Nov. 7, 2009, 12:15 AM
I brought my 16 year old Australian Cattle Dog to the emergency vet tonight because she had what I term "doggie vertigo." She was fine last night....came upstairs to bed, no problem. This morning, she had some trouble going down the stairs and did a few circles once she made it to the yard. By the time I got home from work, she could no longer stand on her own. I couldn't get an appointment with my regular vet until Saturday, so we went to the emergency clinic. They believe she is having an episode of canine vestibular disease. Does anyone have any experience with this?

Marshfield
Nov. 7, 2009, 06:58 AM
Most recover with time and either some meclizine or Cerenia

ponygirl
Nov. 7, 2009, 08:33 AM
My sister and her fiance took their 6 yr old golden to the ER vet due to seizures and disorientation, vomitting, etc. She was diagnosed with Vestibular disease. She's on gabapentin, doxycycline, prednisone and sulfacrate. Has a head tilt and is still neuro in her left hind leg. She's slowly being weaned off the various meds and has shown improvement. We are hoping it's a one time thing or an inner ear issue and not a tumor. Since she's a relatively young dog, the vets said that normally in this case it's a good chance it's a one time thing. THey also mentioned that this is the time of year where it's more common to see. Hang in there.

Foxtrot's
Nov. 7, 2009, 02:10 PM
Two years ago our l3 year old daxie had it too. We absolutely thought he had had a stroke or been poisoned. But the vet took one look at him and said he had geriatric vestibular syndrome and that 'tincture of time' would cure him. If he did not improve within a few days to bringhim back.

His symptoms came on very quickly: were that he walked like a drunken sailor, that his left ear was cocked to the ceiling, that his eyes flickered left/right, left/right very quckly.

He improved in a few days and is fine now except he is very deaf. But then listening was never one of his strong suites anyway.

If I had a dog with the same syptomes again, I think Iwould save myself a bit of money. However, lots of people would be thinking that it could be a tumour, or this or that and to rush their dog in. My vet is not one to push expensive treatments on his clients but I do value his advice and have gone to him for years.

I've known people with a similar condition and they feel very unbalanced and often slide their hands along walls for suport and are cautious up and down stairs or on uneven footing.

Good luck with your bow.

Sing Mia Song
Nov. 7, 2009, 02:53 PM
I've seen it a lot in emergency practice. In fact, it's one of my favorite things to get because the owners think the worst and you get to be the good guy for telling them their dog will be fine with time and supportive care. Seriously, I feel like the world's greatest hero when a CVD comes in. :D
My own elderly dog had about three episodes before she died of unrelated causes. Twice I put her on fluids overnight because she was too upset to drink (she was the kind of dog who really hated the feeling of being out of control--would have a terrible time coming out of anesthesia) and gave her valium and a course of steroids. I do think the hospitalization and fluids helped her bounce back more quickly as her episodes never lasted longer than a couple of days.

CharliesMom
Nov. 7, 2009, 11:32 PM
This was her second episode in less than 5 months. She had a much less severe episode in July. At least then, she could walk with some assistance.

This time, she was completely unable to rise on her own for more that 24 hours. At the vet hospital, she was caged (something she never tolerated at home). I made the decision to "let her go." It was the most difficult decision I have ever made in my life. I wish I could have brought her home a different way, but at least she will be buried here on the farm.

kmsf
Nov. 7, 2009, 11:54 PM
So sorry to hear that things did not go well. Hugs to you for your loss, and for making a brave decision.

Buffyblue
Nov. 8, 2009, 07:50 AM
So sorry for the loss of your old friend.

My Two Cents
Nov. 8, 2009, 08:01 AM
My sympathies. It's never easy losing an old friend.

Zu Zu
Nov. 8, 2009, 08:44 AM
So sorry for your loss. I agree that is the most difficult decision for an owner to make . I made "the most difficult decision of my life 8-22-09 "- still hurts ~ still tears ~ thoughts and prayers for you at this impossible time. RIP Annie.

TripleRipple
Nov. 8, 2009, 11:39 PM
You knew your dog better than anyone else and knew what she might be facing, and chose to do the right thing for her. I faced a similar situation with my best dog ever, and after a third and critical episode of a different kind, made the same decision that you did. She spared me the euthansia by passing away here at the ranch, but part of me felt bad that despite knowing the odds, I didn't pull out all the stops in what I even knew would be a futile attempt to try every last possibilty.

But I reflected long and hard that week on what was best for my best friend ever, and I did what was best for her (and not what was best for me). I hope that I never am faced with such a tough choice again in my life.

I am so sorry for your loss and that you had to face that toughest decision and that it came down to doing the last kind act you could do in the best interests of your furry friend.

moonriverfarm
Nov. 9, 2009, 05:19 PM
Hugs to you. I too well know your pain. You were the caretaker and did best by your girl. She is now able to romp and play in Heaven with all the others who left us too soon.

Roxyllsk
Nov. 12, 2009, 06:31 PM
So sorry to hear this .

My old dog had one bad episode last October, then another THIS October, but not as serious (he seems okay now).

It's very difficult seeing them like this It's never an easy decision to make.

caryledee
Nov. 12, 2009, 06:40 PM
I'm so sorry...it's never easy but it sounds like you made the right decision. :cry:

Root Beer
Nov. 12, 2009, 07:39 PM
I'm sorry you lost your girl. It's never easy, even when it's the right thing to do.

Hugs to you.

Horsecrazy27
Nov. 15, 2009, 09:48 PM
This was her second episode in less than 5 months. She had a much less severe episode in July. At least then, she could walk with some assistance.

This time, she was completely unable to rise on her own for more that 24 hours. At the vet hospital, she was caged (something she never tolerated at home). I made the decision to "let her go." It was the most difficult decision I have ever made in my life. I wish I could have brought her home a different way, but at least she will be buried here on the farm.

So sorry to hear. God Bless

Laurierace
Nov. 15, 2009, 10:04 PM
Godspeed Annie, you are in good company now as you were on this side.