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View Full Version : Best process for removing caked-on mud



zahena
Nov. 3, 2009, 01:37 PM
Since it's been raining non-stop here in Texas when it does stop, the horses promptly roll in the mud. And my horse seems to take extreme joy in this process. Since he's a skinny boy and its getting to be chilly out, bathing him is no longer an option. And as the winter draws closer and closer I'm quickly finding that bathing him really will be off the table in all shapes and forms.

Any suggestions on how to remove the mud without water? I have a scraper (like a shedding blade) and it seems to get the job done. However, my horse is also very sensitive and gets very "ouchy" with the blade.

Any hints or tips and tricks will be greatly appreciated!!!!

SkipHiLad4me
Nov. 3, 2009, 01:56 PM
I use one of these except mine has smaller, more flexible fingers. It's more of the "face" version of this one. Works great! Especially for long winter coats.

http://www.smartpakequine.com/productclass.aspx?productClassid=480

CB/TB
Nov. 3, 2009, 02:24 PM
I've found that getting dry mud off is easier than trying to scrape away at the wet stuff. Curry comb, shed blade, etc then stiff brush seems to work best for me, even with a winter fur coat!

buck22
Nov. 3, 2009, 04:10 PM
I like a rice root brush for knocking back the mud. and I agree, its best done when the mud is dry. I also am eagerly anticipating the arrival of my new shop vac, I love to vacuum long winter coats!

nadasy
Nov. 3, 2009, 04:36 PM
I find that the woven nylon dish scrungies for cleaning dishes works really well. I've been buying and using them since the early 90's when a friend in the UK gave me one to take mud off horses legs after hunting. They are about 2" thick and 4" across. I have a few yellow ones that are original.

Don't know what they actually called, but they look like donuts without a middle hole, but do have a center depression where the end is before it's rolled, if that makes sense.

You can find them at a supermarket or grocery near the sponges, but they are about 2"x2" for smaller hands-great for kids and their ponies, but sometimes you can find the larger ones, better for big horses and areas. I use mine every day after Harry's been out rolling in the little bit of mud he can find, usually on his cheeks, neck, knees, hocks etc. :D He gets his supper, and when I go out about an hour later, it's all dried on, and I can just lightly brush the donut over it, and it flakes right off. Great on sensitive and clipped horses because it takes so little pressure to flick off the mud.

Hope this helps. Dinah

SarahandSam
Nov. 3, 2009, 04:38 PM
Shed Flower! They work awesomely at getting off dried mud without bothering my sensitive little sorrel.

zahena
Nov. 3, 2009, 05:35 PM
Cool! I will have to try some fo these ideas out. Plus, I sometimes am a little ADHD and I don't want to groom my poor beast for an hour. I want to RIDE!

VarsityHero4
Nov. 3, 2009, 06:36 PM
wait for it to dry, take a shedding blade to the majority of it, then curry the rest out. finish with a flicker brush and voila! a (sort of) clean horse!

mothermucker12
Nov. 3, 2009, 07:11 PM
i start with the shedding blade too,the one you can pull out and switch the blade length, i switch it over to the shorter nubs(seems more gentle) and then use my jelly scrubber...love it!!

mvp
Nov. 3, 2009, 07:12 PM
Is it time for a whole 'nother thread about....

wait for it....

Ye Olde CACTUS CLOTH?!?

It could be. Do a search. If you still think you need to here more from me about mud and the cactus cloth, just let me know.

the_other_mother
Nov. 3, 2009, 07:58 PM
I use a mteal curry to get the worst off and then vacume off the rest! If you dont have a regular horse vac, a shop vac will do!

VarsityHero4
Nov. 3, 2009, 11:08 PM
I use a mteal curry to get the worst off and then vacume off the rest! If you dont have a regular horse vac, a shop vac will do!

How do you use it? I tried it after seeing a suggestion for it on this board and it was WAY too strong, I could barely pull it along my horse's coat as it just stuck in place. I used the wider attachment (maybe 6 inches?).

Laurierace
Nov. 4, 2009, 08:42 AM
Shed Flower! They work awesomely at getting off dried mud without bothering my sensitive little sorrel.

Yep, this was going to be my recommendation as well. The only bad thing about it as opposed to the shedding blade is you are holding it right in your hand instead of holding the handle so much of the dust and dirt goes onto you. That has always been my unofficial method of horse cleaning anyway, I take the dirt off them, put it on me and we are finished so no big deal.

Zu Zu
Nov. 4, 2009, 08:44 AM
wait for it to dry, take a shedding blade to the majority of it, then curry the rest out. finish with a flicker brush and voila! a (sort of) clean horse!
DITTO ~ What VarsityHero said.

Hilary
Nov. 4, 2009, 11:51 AM
Then put a sheet on him.

PennyChrome
Nov. 4, 2009, 04:04 PM
I guess a curry comb has become a thing of the past?

mvp
Nov. 6, 2009, 08:03 PM
But the horse is SKINNY so he won't like metal and/or rubber curry combs!

Cactus cloth.

*JumpIt*
Nov. 6, 2009, 11:18 PM
after the curry, brush, repeat, use a damp towel and rub the horse down. The dust sticks to the damp towel, I swear after this my mare looks like she's had a bath. Another thought is to groom daily if possible 2x per day, it you don't let it build it will come off a lot easier.

MunchkinsMom
Nov. 7, 2009, 09:18 PM
I guess I was lucky, when I lived in muddy CT, the horse would have been inside for several hours by the time I got there, so all the mud was dry. I would break out my little Eureka canister style home vacuum, and within 10 minutes, I had a shiny horse, and no dust in my nose. The luck part was that the mud was dried by the time I got to the barn.

It was rather comical, he would usually be muddy only on one side, so I would get to the barn, think he was clean, and then he would move and show me is "adobe" side. . . out would come the vacuum.

equineartworks
Nov. 8, 2009, 07:15 AM
I just picked up a new rubber nubby wash mit at TSC yesterday for $1.79 on sale.

http://www.tractorsupply.com/equine/horse-grooming/other-horse-grooming-accessories/equine-editions-rubber-horse-grooming-mitt-5007081


I worked better than anything...even on Katie lol! My hands are so bad right now that holding anything for a long period of time is nearly impossible. So the glove works great for me and the horses love it...even on their faces and legs.

in_the_zone
Nov. 8, 2009, 08:37 AM
Professional rider and semi-professional groom...

Hose off the legs.

Use one of these plastic curries in one hand, and a medium brush in the other.
http://www.doversaddlery.com/product.asp?pn=X1-1009&ids=750280755

Spray some showsheen or vetrolin onto a brush and go over the body. Spray some on the legs too. Clip any grossly long hair so the mud doesn't cake on. Blankets and sheets.

VarsityHero4
Nov. 8, 2009, 10:24 AM
But the horse is SKINNY so he won't like metal and/or rubber curry combs!

Cactus cloth.

If he can't handle even a rubber curry mitt (with the tiny nubbies) I think you're going to have a rough winter. Unless he doesn't actually get that muddy I find that the cactus cloth doesn't give the deep clean on a winter coat like the curries. My skinny minnie gets CAKED to the point where the shedding blade has a hard time. I just take my time and have figured out a way that doesn't bother her. If it's that big of an issue I'd just put a sheet on him.

LauraKY
Nov. 8, 2009, 10:39 AM
Yep, this was going to be my recommendation as well. The only bad thing about it as opposed to the shedding blade is you are holding it right in your hand instead of holding the handle so much of the dust and dirt goes onto you. That has always been my unofficial method of horse cleaning anyway, I take the dirt off them, put it on me and we are finished so no big deal.

And then into the house! At least in my house!

Halcyon Days
Nov. 8, 2009, 11:57 AM
I have rheumatoid arthritis, no way can I deal with scrubbing on a crusty horse, mine are all wearing turnout sheets--hose off the legs, whip the sheet off, voila, you're ready to ride! :)

carp
Nov. 8, 2009, 02:44 PM
Showsheen on the mane and tail before the horse gets muddy so that the dirt slides out when you comb them.
Cactus cloth on the legs.
Vacuum the rest.

eventingismylife
Nov. 8, 2009, 03:47 PM
I've found that getting dry mud off is easier than trying to scrape away at the wet stuff. Curry comb, shed blade, etc then stiff brush seems to work best for me, even with a winter fur coat!

Yep, always does the trick.:)