PDA

View Full Version : How would you have disciplined this "bratty" pony?



busterwells
Nov. 2, 2009, 07:24 PM
I need some advice on how "I should have disciplined" our pony on this particular trail ride. I will try to make a long story short.

5 of us go out on trail, including my daughter on our Pony of America. After a nice 30 minute ride. My daughter and my friend decide they are going to separate and canter around a big oval trail around a pond and the other 3 of us decide to wait at on side of the pond. I guess some brush had overgrown on this trail and they were cantering and had to zig zag while cantering and our POA decides to buck and throw my daughter off (she is bareback) in the field. I go and help my daughter brush herself off as my friend rounds up our pony. I then tell my daughter she needs to get back on and ride her back to the barn. As she tries to remount ( she was bareback so she usually takes a small leap and throws her leg over while grabbing the mane) the pony then rears up and then bucks and kicks out throwing my daughter on the ground again. Well by the time I get off my horse and calm my daughter down I am wondering if the horse is going to know what I am disciplining her for and I didn't quite know what to do? My daughter was riding in short contest reins so it would have been hard to lunge in circles. I don't want the pony to think this is okay behavior , but I guess I froze, not knowing what do. My daughter did get back on with my help and rode a 1/2 mile back to the barn. Hmmm, I guess I need to find out what would have been the correct reaction from me in case our pony acts like a "freak" again.

Huntertwo
Nov. 2, 2009, 08:02 PM
I have a POA myself. My first question- Is he normally like this? Could it be possible the brush hit his belly, possibly prickers?

As far as the remount, maybe she threw herself too hard up on him, startled him, possibly kicked him in a sensitive spot by mistake, hurt his back by leaping up on him?

busterwells
Nov. 2, 2009, 08:11 PM
She can get over excited sometimes and buck a little on trail (she is very spunky). But this time was inexcusable to me, she threw my daughter off. Secondly, my daughter mounts like this all the time and the pony never budges, she is great on the ground. Hmmmm. I tend to think she is just getting a little bratty lately and need to nip it in the butt.

Huntertwo
Nov. 2, 2009, 08:15 PM
Ah, okay... Is it possible for you to get on and work her or take her on a trail ride?
POA's are great, but still a pony. ;)

busterwells
Nov. 2, 2009, 08:20 PM
Ah, okay... Is it possible for you to get and work her or take her on a trail ride?
POA's are great, but still a pony. ;)

Yes, I can work her myself, I guess I have never been in this situation. My 2 other horses are my lazy trusty dusty trail horses, I never had to be agressive about bad behavior and I have seen all types of discipline and I don't agree with some people that decide to beat their horse?

twofatponies
Nov. 2, 2009, 09:40 PM
I don't think there's any "discipline" (ie punishment) that is useful after the fact. He wouldn't learn anything from being hit after she fell off, for example. He might have gotten worked up from the brush/fall situation and the leaping on startled him, because his mind was still elsewhere. I would have taken a read on his body language before leaping back on - was he calm and relaxed, or still tense and fussy? If the latter, then walk him in some circles or patterns or back him up a few times, or walk him over to a log or rock for remounting, or stand and chit chat for a moment, waiting until you see he has settled and is paying attention.

If it was a one time thing, I think he was probably just goosey from what had just happened and needed to refocus his mind on his rider.

goeslikestink
Nov. 7, 2009, 12:21 AM
I need some advice on how "I should have disciplined" our pony on this particular trail ride. I will try to make a long story short.

5 of us go out on trail, including my daughter on our Pony of America. After a nice 30 minute ride. My daughter and my friend decide they are going to separate and canter around a big oval trail around a pond and the other 3 of us decide to wait at on side of the pond. I guess some brush had overgrown on this trail and they were cantering and had to zig zag while cantering and our POA decides to buck and throw my daughter off (she is bareback) in the field. I go and help my daughter brush herself off as my friend rounds up our pony. I then tell my daughter she needs to get back on and ride her back to the barn. As she tries to remount ( she was bareback so she usually takes a small leap and throws her leg over while grabbing the mane) the pony then rears up and then bucks and kicks out throwing my daughter on the ground again. Well by the time I get off my horse and calm my daughter down I am wondering if the horse is going to know what I am disciplining her for and I didn't quite know what to do? My daughter was riding in short contest reins so it would have been hard to lunge in circles. I don't want the pony to think this is okay behavior , but I guess I froze, not knowing what do. My daughter did get back on with my help and rode a 1/2 mile back to the barn. Hmmm, I guess I need to find out what would have been the correct reaction from me in case our pony acts like a "freak" again.

not the horses fault its yours for letting your daughter ride the horse bareback and not fully under control - bit of unfairiness to your daughter in my book your the adult and should be a tad more responsible

kevinshorses
Nov. 7, 2009, 01:35 AM
not the horses fault its yours for letting your daughter ride the horse bareback and not fully under control - bit of unfairiness to your daughter in my book your the adult and should be a tad more responsible

I'll second that!!

carp
Nov. 7, 2009, 09:23 AM
There's legitimate spooking - a dove takes off twittering and flapping right right as you go past, a deer leaps out of the woods, etc.
Then there's bratty spooking, where a fresh and frisky horse decides to jump sideways and throw a bucking fit at the same rock you've ridden past for the last two years.

In my opinion, the cure for both is the same - put the horse to work. Just approach the work differently. If the horse is truly scared, the work is a way to show that you are confident and unfazed by the scary object. Hopefully the horse will pick up on your confidence and focus on that rather than the scary object. Do a little bit of work: some stopping and backing, a few side passes, etc. and then continue on once you feel the horse relax. The work should be gentle and focussed, so that the horse thinks, "I guess my human isn't scared if she's thinking about sidepasses instead of those flapping things."

If the horse is being a brat, the work is a way to assert your authority and to redirect the energy into something other than bucking and bolting. Spin in circles, back for twenty strides, practice going from a trot to a dead stop and then into a trot again, whatever. The work should be hard enough that the horse says, "Well, that's no fun, I really would prefer to be quietly poking along right about now."

Unfortunately, since your daughter was bareback, she wasn't going to have a secure enough seat to win a pissing match if the horse copped an attitude about having to work. Bad decision on a brisk autumn day.

JackSprats Mom
Nov. 16, 2009, 09:51 PM
I would suggest that until the pony gets over the bucking on the trail your daughter ride in a saddle so she has a little more control.

Pony did learn on this occassion that the behavior wasn't going to get it out of work as your daughter rode it back.

Pony should be corrected for bucking on the trail every time! its not excusable even if its fresh (if it were my horse it would get a sharp smack when he bucked).

If pony rears again then I would get someone to ride it that has experience with rears its a nasty dangerous habit and needs to get nipped in the bud asap!

Kyzteke
Nov. 18, 2009, 06:58 AM
not the horses fault its yours for letting your daughter ride the horse bareback and not fully under control - bit of unfairiness to your daughter in my book your the adult and should be a tad more responsible

Ditto.

Sounds like this is a mare, right? Many of them are more sensitive to stuff under their belly, etc. Then you throw in brisk weather and a gallop with other horses, PLUS a rider who may have slid back and "goosed" the mare in the flank -- total recipe for disaster.

Riding bareback is great for developing the seat, but obviously you don't have the security & control you do with a saddle.

Personally, if you let your daughter ride a "spunky" pony at a canter with other horses out on the trail, expect the kid to part company with the horse from time to time.

If you ride, you fall off. Happens to us all. It's not the horse's fault if the person can't stay on them....that's our job.

If you feel strongly about the child NEVER falling off, get her a saddle. She'll still come off on occasion, but probably not as often :)

bizbachfan
Nov. 18, 2009, 08:18 AM
I would say saddle on the trail, bareback in more controlled environment in the arena. Separating from other horses and cantering around was something I would have allowed only on a very bombproof quiet old pony that had proven itself. I think there were just too many opportunities for issues on this ride and I really don't blame the pony. Okay so your daughter always mounts like that, however the pony was already obviously freaked out, upset. Doesn't sound like the best way to mount, a leg up would work much better.

As long as she got back and rode back I don't think any other discipline was needed.

Kyzteke
Nov. 18, 2009, 05:09 PM
She can get over excited sometimes and buck a little on trail (she is very spunky). But this time was inexcusable to me, she threw my daughter off. Secondly, my daughter mounts like this all the time and the pony never budges, she is great on the ground. Hmmmm. I tend to think she is just getting a little bratty lately and need to nip it in the butt.

Wait -- is this the same mare that you sent to a trainer and it started bucking all the time out on the trail? It seems it is:(posted by busterwells)

"Okay hear is the story. I hope I can get some good advice because I am so frustrated.

I have a Poa mare that is 11 years old. She is very spunky, but was my favorite horse because she was so trustworthy, never bucked or reared.
My only issue with her was slowing down, she always wants to go, but I enjoyed her spunk and happiness to play on the trail. She always made me feel safe.

Well, I decided to work with a trainer to do some showing in western pleasure and thought this would also teach her to slow up a little and be a little more controllable in the ring.

Well, after working with her to put her head down and putting a training fork on her, the horse started to get very irritated. She started kicking out her back legs and then to eventually bucking and now trying to throw me off.

I am so upset because now AND I cannot ride her at all and have tried to work with her for the last month to work out this bucking issue. I have her walking now, but If I try to get her in a trot she instantly starts bucking. I feel like I have ruined my wonderful trail horse and wish I had never started this.

I guess I am lookig for advice on how to work out this issue, I feel it is mental with her and maybe this was not a good idea with such an energetic horse to train for western pleasure showing or maybe the trainer worked too fast at trying to set her head and setting her pace at the same time. I am new at this so I don't know. I just want my old happy horse back. Help!

If this is the same mare she has a pretty long history of bucking...you mention it over & over again in your posts. Really NOT the appropriate horse for a young kid to be riding bareback, Mom!

mishmash
Nov. 23, 2009, 07:58 PM
Daughter needs to ride in saddle. Mom needs to be sure path is clear and safe before daughter goes cantering off.
If pony has had bucking problem, daughter should probably ride a different pony....

Beverley
Dec. 12, 2009, 12:49 AM
I agree with Twofatponies- 'getting after' a horse after it's dumped the rider really doesn't accomplish anything. What works is getting right back on the horse and working it harder, the ol' make the right thing easier and the wrong thing harder work philosophy.

When riding in France, I was assigned to a young selle francais mare who had succesfully mastered the 'drop the shoulder and dump the rider' technique. I was somewhat prepared, knowing it would be coming sooner or later- and when it did, I made sure to hang onto the reins, pop up, get right back on. She was astonished. Never tried it with anyone again. Mind you 'one time' doesn't cure many of them.

In your case, there could be a whole lot of reasons why the pony bucked when being ridden on the trail bareback. If it were mine, I'd ride saddled only on the trails, bareback to kid's heart's content in an arena, where, if rider falls off, getting right back on and continuing the ride is more easily accomplished and less intimidating. Maybe in a year or two, try bareback on trails again. Set pony and rider up for success, not failure.

Beverley
Dec. 12, 2009, 12:52 AM
If this is the same mare she has a pretty long history of bucking...you mention it over & over again in your posts. Really NOT the appropriate horse for a young kid to be riding bareback, Mom!

It seems to me that when someone comes to these parts seeking some friendly advice, and all you have to offer is a haughty lecture, maybe you should just skip posting?

Kyzteke
Dec. 12, 2009, 05:13 PM
It seems to me that when someone comes to these parts seeking some friendly advice, and all you have to offer is a haughty lecture, maybe you should just skip posting?

Or maybe the mom should not put her child bareback on a horse with a history of bucking? That's what I advised, and if you define that as "haughty" you & I are not using the same dictionary.

When someone posts on a public forum, they are asking for anyone's advise/opinion, etc. Please notice that I was far from the only one who advised that a) disciplining a horse AFTER it had bucked someone off was pointless and b) a child should be using a saddle in this case.

So what makes my advise "haughty" and yours just ducky?

Please....

candyappy
Dec. 12, 2009, 05:54 PM
If you feel your daughter is safe riding this pony under normal circumstances then it isn't a " bratty pony" issue. Most horses will give us a warning if we are taking the time to listen . Now that we are into cooler weather the horses are going to be more fresh. I would suggest a good lunge session so you can gauge her attitude before your daughter rides. Put your daughter in a saddle if you are trail riding or away from home please. Once you got your daughter back on the pony, you should have ponied her at least for a while to see if the pony was still feeling the same. I think ponies get a bad rap and are blamed for the incompetence of the adult who owns them. My kids had a wonderful shetland. I couldn't ride him but I lunged and worked him from the ground before they got on and even when they didn't ride . We never had issues.

Beverley
Dec. 12, 2009, 09:59 PM
So what makes my advise "haughty" and yours just ducky?

Please....

Oh, the longwinded recap of prior threads, presented in a manner that suggests something 'bad' about the poster, and ending with:

"Really NOT the appropriate horse for a young kid to be riding bareback, Mom!"

Sure doesn't come across as an effort to be helpful.

You are quite correct that you are not the only one who stated disapproval of a Mom 'allowing' her daughter to ride a horse under a given set of circumstances. BS, I say, just another example of the helicopter parenting so prevalent these days. All horses are potentially dangerous, one accepts risks riding any of them. I say good for Busterwells for wanting to get to the bottom of the pony's issue so her daughter can enjoy her. If you're going to condemn a parent for letting a kid ride a horse that 'might' buck or otherwise misbehave- well, gee, guess we better outlaw kids from from riding, huh? I wonder if today's riding child gets to have any fun at all- I suppose some of y'all would be horrified that us 'barn rats' back in the 60s rode all sorts of different horses, all over the place, all day long, without a speck of adult supervision, and, gasp, no hard hats or safety vests. What fun it was.

Hip
Dec. 13, 2009, 01:37 AM
If you're going to condemn a parent for letting a kid ride a horse that 'might' buck or otherwise misbehave- well, gee, guess we better outlaw kids from from riding, huh? I wonder if today's riding child gets to have any fun at all- I suppose some of y'all would be horrified that us 'barn rats' back in the 60s rode all sorts of different horses, all over the place, all day long, without a speck of adult supervision, and, gasp, no hard hats or safety vests. What fun it was.

10-4, 10-4. I think my mom probably would have been in jail today for the stuff she 'let' me do while out at the barn...'by myself'. Didn't see me from sun-up to sun-down when it became too dark to do anything fun.

Anyway, first off, a horse(wo)man never blames the horse for falling off. If you're overmounted, then find another horse to ride. People fall off horses. Just the way it is. If you haven't fallen off, you haven't 'really ridden' much.

Next, bucking is when a horse bogs his head between his knees and you might even hear a bellow when he blows. His mouth will be open (usually) and to the person standing on the ground, his hooves will be about eyeball height. They can either peg-leg it or do a sunfish, which is that spectacular sight you see in rodeos. Usually, a horse might crow-hop a bit and while it seems scary from aboard, it's not really that much. I've even seen firsthand where people thought a horse bucked with them when the horse coughed.... But, you can fall off of any of them.

Personally, I think the kid should get back on and ride back, which she did. This sounds like a case of **** happens. Don't blow it up into something where the pony starts to think ahead. Just go along till something does happen, then deal with it. Sounds like you've had problems with her for quite a while. I'm thinking that maybe you should get the help of the trainer again...and let your daughter be a kid with a pony. :yes:

meupatdoes
Dec. 13, 2009, 09:08 AM
Once you've already fallen off, here's what you do:

Calmly walk up to the pony without holding a grudge and catch it.


Calmly lead him back to the mounting block or a place where you can get back on. Do not act pissed or get after him as it will only scare him and that sounds like it is what caused the second episode with the pony. Either your daughter was getting pissy with him or someone who owned him before taught him he would get his @ss beat.

Get back on.


Carry on.
To school the pony, do exactly what you were doing before and THAT is the place where you school the behavior.


I walked this talk two days ago. A four year old got playful in a lead change going away from a jump and sent me absolutely unceremoniously sailing. He did a surprised little courtesy circle, and trotted right back to me. I took the reins, quietly led him back to the mounting block, hopped on, gave him his customary pat for standing well at the block, promptly picked up a nice little canter, and headed immediately back to the same jump, jumped it, and without being rough or holding a grudge halted on the back side, softly backed two steps, patted him for halting and backing well, and then did the whole thing a couple more times before putting him away.

The part where I trained him to try to contain his youthful exuberance a little more was where we quietly halted and backed after the jump. That was where I said, "BooBoo, you need to stay focused a little better after the jumps, ok?" THAT was the training moment.

Do not set up the appurtenant training moment for disaster by getting after a horse on the ground before you get to the training moment. Get to the real training moment as quietly, smoothly and undramatically as you can so the horse has half a (calm, quiet) brain to LISTEN to the training moment when it occurs.

They are just horses.
Getting their @ss beat from the ground doesn't teach them anything.
Getting back to WHERE THE PROBLEM OCCURRED and quietly showing them what you DO want them to do does.


And when he does it well again, pat him and put him back in his house.

Hip
Dec. 13, 2009, 12:26 PM
Once you've already fallen off, here's what you do:

Calmly walk up to the pony without holding a grudge and catch it.


Calmly lead him back to the mounting block or a place where you can get back on. Do not act pissed or get after him as it will only scare him and that sounds like it is what caused the second episode with the pony. Either your daughter was getting pissy with him or someone who owned him before taught him he would get his @ss beat.

Get back on.


Carry on.
To school the pony, do exactly what you were doing before and THAT is the place where you school the behavior.


I walked this talk two days ago. A four year old got playful in a lead change going away from a jump and sent me absolutely unceremoniously sailing. He did a surprised little courtesy circle, and trotted right back to me. I took the reins, quietly led him back to the mounting block, hopped on, gave him his customary pat for standing well at the block, promptly picked up a nice little canter, and headed immediately back to the same jump, jumped it, and without being rough or holding a grudge halted on the back side, softly backed two steps, patted him for halting and backing well, and then did the whole thing a couple more times before putting him away.

The part where I trained him to try to contain his youthful exuberance a little more was where we quietly halted and backed after the jump. That was where I said, "BooBoo, you need to stay focused a little better after the jumps, ok?" THAT was the training moment.

Do not set up the appurtenant training moment for disaster by getting after a horse on the ground before you get to the training moment. Get to the real training moment as quietly, smoothly and undramatically as you can so the horse has half a (calm, quiet) brain to LISTEN to the training moment when it occurs.

They are just horses.
Getting their @ss beat from the ground doesn't teach them anything.
Getting back to WHERE THE PROBLEM OCCURRED and quietly showing them what you DO want them to do does.


And when he does it well again, pat him and put him back in his house.

Your post is one of the best explained posts I've seen on this subject. Also, something I've seen missing on quite few training posts, I've found that talking to the horse (as you said) and telling him what he did wrong, he'll 'usually' respond very nicely. Just like you were talking to another human. Horses 'get it'. It might have to do with body language too.

Alibhai's Alibar
Dec. 14, 2009, 01:31 PM
Your post is one of the best explained posts I've seen on this subject. Also, something I've seen missing on quite few training posts, I've found that talking to the horse (as you said) and telling him what he did wrong, he'll 'usually' respond very nicely. Just like you were talking to another human. Horses 'get it'. It might have to do with body language too.

Agreed- great post :cool:

GotGait
Dec. 14, 2009, 02:02 PM
He did a surprised little courtesy circle, and trotted right back to me.

This made me laugh. When I take a dirt nap, my horse always tears off like a race horse breaking through the gate. Then I have to get up and yell, "Where are you going?!" and she stops, turns around, looks bewildered, and comes back. I don't know what will happen if I ever get knocked cold because she might keep right on running to the next state over.

So when she comes back... I calmly pick up the reins, get to where I can mount up safely, and off we go again.
I think if you don't get back on, you're not only training the horse that this behavior gets them out of work, you're also training yourself that it's easier to walk away from the situation.
I don't know about other people, but I tend to over think when "stuff happens" and if I don't get right back on and deal with it, it festers. I start thinking about "next time" and running all the different possible outcomes around in my head until I don't want to ride at all.
So I suck it up and get back on like nothing happened. That's really all you can do.

matryoshka
Dec. 14, 2009, 06:04 PM
I follow John Lyon's guide on discipline. Somewhere he states that when a horse misbehaves (real misbehavior, not a spook), you have three seconds to kill him. If you can't apply punishment within three seconds, you've lost your chance. You have up to three seconds to start the discipline, and then you stop within the three seconds, even if you are still angry. Keep in mind, that is my take on what he said. Without a direct quote, I could be grossly misrepresenting John Lyon's intent.

Following the three-second rule works for me and the horses I encounter. They respect rather than fear me.

This is also why I don't carry a gun. I follow the three-second rule, and there were times when I would have shot my former horse in the head when he was acting up on the trail.

I add my own rule to this in that whatever discipline you use must be appropriate in type and intensity to the offense. I DO NOT punish when a horse spooks. Not ever. I don't even discipline for bucking unless it is prolonged and the horse is really trying to get me off. IOW, discipline should be fair and appropriate, but the 3-second rule helps to put a start and end time on it so I do not abuse my horse in a fit of temper.

In the case of a fallen or injured rider, take care of the rider first. Disciplining the horse at that point is inappropriate. Get somebody who can ride the horse through the misbehavior and add work, not punishment.

p.s. When I'm trimming a horse who is misbehaving persistently, and I can feel myself getting angry, I'll take him in hand and back him up. This takes a lot more work for him than for me. It has the dual benefit of tiring him out and establishing my dominance without hitting or otherwise scaring the horse. I back them up, ask them to move forward, repeat, until my temper is cooled and the horse is showing me an appropriately submissive attitude (head lower, backing up immediately when asked, coming forward when asked, stopping when I stop, etc.). If my daughter was okay following such a fall, I might have spent some time backing the horse up or doing other in-hand work to establish that he works for humans, not the other way around.

Cita
Dec. 14, 2009, 06:45 PM
I need some advice on how "I should have disciplined" our pony on this particular trail ride. I will try to make a long story short.

5 of us go out on trail, including my daughter on our Pony of America. After a nice 30 minute ride. My daughter and my friend decide they are going to separate and canter around a big oval trail around a pond and the other 3 of us decide to wait at on side of the pond. I guess some brush had overgrown on this trail and they were cantering and had to zig zag while cantering and our POA decides to buck and throw my daughter off (she is bareback) in the field. I go and help my daughter brush herself off as my friend rounds up our pony. I then tell my daughter she needs to get back on and ride her back to the barn. As she tries to remount ( she was bareback so she usually takes a small leap and throws her leg over while grabbing the mane) the pony then rears up and then bucks and kicks out throwing my daughter on the ground again. Well by the time I get off my horse and calm my daughter down I am wondering if the horse is going to know what I am disciplining her for and I didn't quite know what to do? My daughter was riding in short contest reins so it would have been hard to lunge in circles. I don't want the pony to think this is okay behavior , but I guess I froze, not knowing what do. My daughter did get back on with my help and rode a 1/2 mile back to the barn. Hmmm, I guess I need to find out what would have been the correct reaction from me in case our pony acts like a "freak" again.

1) Your daughter should learn to mount more gently if she is planning to go around riding bareback. Not that I haven't been guilty of worse, myself, but IMO it's totally legitimate for a horse to be freaked out if someone is leaping onto their back and pulling themselves on by their mane.

2) Again, IMO, if you're riding bareback out on trail you kind of have to expect that you will fall off at some point. Horses spook, terrain gets rough, stuff happens, and there's less margin for error for staying on. If it were me riding around bareback cross-country and I fell off, no matter what the horse did, I'd be kicking myself for goofing off and taking risks. Not considering it an important training issue.

3) For discipline, I think you did the right thing. Your daughter getting back on and riding home was plenty discipline enough. Personally, I never ever discipline my mount when I fall off, because the LAST thing I want is a horse that gallops off into the sunset when I hit the ground because the horse is afraid I'm going to smack it around! Plus what everyone else has said about the "3 second rule," appropriate timing, etc.

4) I don't think we have to take every possible safety measure every time we ride, but we DO have to assume the risks. So if your daughter wants to gallop around a field, bareback, on a pony that's known to buck, then that's fine! But you also have to expect that the pony might buck, and your daughter might fall off. Can't take one without the other! Likewise, if you're getting on bareback without a mounting block, if you're not well-practiced at doing it gently, then you have to accept the risk that you're going to freak the pony out when you struggle to get on.

bornfreenowexpensive
Dec. 14, 2009, 07:07 PM
I wouldn't say it was being a "bratty" pony....it was just being a pony. Your daughter needs to learn to feel a buck coming...and how to stop it before it happens.

But after she has hit the ground...there is no disciplining.

Next time, give her a leg up. The pony was either too lit up from the canter/being loose for your daughter to safely mount from the ground...or your daughter caught her in the mouth with the reins while mounting (since you said she reared....that usually tells me some one pulled on them).

Next time...have a hand on the pony and give your daughter a leg up. Jumping up from the ground is VERY hard on their backs....and very few tense lit up ponies are going to stand quietly for it!

Lori
Dec. 14, 2009, 07:07 PM
Sorry about your POA being a butthead.
I like the advise meupatdoes wrote along with some of the other posts. Sounds like one I would have done some calm "wet saddle blanket" work with immediately with an adult and then put your child back on (assuming the child cannot do the WSB circle cantering). I cannot emphasize more that it should only be done with a calm, level head and in a matter of fact way.

I learned to ride on a pony that did everything in the book to get the rider off her back. Taking off was the worst of them. She did not really buck, but would set her head and just RUN. Then she'd take a quick hop to the side or run you against a tree to try to remove the kids. Even with a kimberwicke, she did this.
This little gal taught me posture, grip, patience (it was a drag to have to walk all the way home on those trails or roads!!) and most of all how to ride by feel which is priceless to me as I am tuned into feeling what the pony will do before they do it by nature now.
My favorite was to ride and train is still bareback, but now I use a Best Friend pad (hey, I'm older and have to do my own laundry now!!).
I like the advise meupatdoes wrote along with some of the other posts.

candyappy
Dec. 16, 2009, 04:01 PM
Oh, the longwinded recap of prior threads, presented in a manner that suggests something 'bad' about the poster, and ending with:

"Really NOT the appropriate horse for a young kid to be riding bareback, Mom!"

Sure doesn't come across as an effort to be helpful.

You are quite correct that you are not the only one who stated disapproval of a Mom 'allowing' her daughter to ride a horse under a given set of circumstances. BS, I say, just another example of the helicopter parenting so prevalent these days. All horses are potentially dangerous, one accepts risks riding any of them. I say good for Busterwells for wanting to get to the bottom of the pony's issue so her daughter can enjoy her. If you're going to condemn a parent for letting a kid ride a horse that 'might' buck or otherwise misbehave- well, gee, guess we better outlaw kids from from riding, huh? I wonder if today's riding child gets to have any fun at all- I suppose some of y'all would be horrified that us 'barn rats' back in the 60s rode all sorts of different horses, all over the place, all day long, without a speck of adult supervision, and, gasp, no hard hats or safety vests. What fun it was.





For me it was the late 70's and the 80's. My parents had NO IDEA what I rode and what I did. helmets were unheard of if you weren't showing. It was a blast, i could ride anything I got on and I wouldn't change it for the world.

jenm
Dec. 16, 2009, 04:34 PM
Have you checked the pony for back pain?

Kyzteke
Dec. 19, 2009, 07:06 PM
Have you checked the pony for back pain?

For all the people who are busting me for being so mean and non-helpful, it might be enlightening for you to go read through ALL busterwells old posts on this mare.

She was sent to a trainer who had actually made her WORSE -- turned her into a bucking fiend -- and the OP thought she was ruined for sure.

Then finally (on the urging of many COTH posters) had the mare worked on by a chiropractor, if I recall correctly, and that helped alot.

This pony has had issues for a while -- both physical and other.

I rode a snotty horse when I was a kid, too -- a mare that ran away from me constantly. My parents didn't care - -they didn't know.

If you want to put your kid on that sort of horse, bully for you! But don't get ticked off when the horse (or pony) lawn darts the kid. It's not the pony OR the kid's fault...it's the parents allowing for this combo.

Yes, these kind of pony's can teach you alot. They can also hurt you or sour you on horses/riding all together. It depends on the parties involved.

But my point is that none of this is NEW for this pony and the OP doesn't seem to have learned much from the first several experiences....

Beverley
Dec. 19, 2009, 09:31 PM
But my point is that none of this is NEW for this pony and the OP doesn't seem to have learned much from the first several experiences....

And my point is, so what? The OP simply asked, seemingly in the spirit of learning and getting input from more knowledgeable folks (though such input should always be taken with a grain of salt on a forum like this!) about appropriate discipline for a specific circumstance. The OP did NOT ask 'should my daughter ride this pony?' The OP did NOT ask for your unilateral judgment on 'the body' of her posts- which frankly, continue to come across as a big 'tsk tsk' from you to the poster, how dare she start all these threads seeking advice?

As you noted earlier- when one posts in these parts, one is fair game for whatever response anyone wants to give. That goes for the OP- and it goes for you, too!:)

matryoshka
Dec. 19, 2009, 09:51 PM
Touche!

wendybird
Dec. 21, 2009, 03:46 AM
Yes fair game, but really the same sort of problems come up time and time again, often with the same helpful people rushing in with the same solutions. Then a few months later there's another post with a variation of the original problem.
Beverley, you are allowing yourself to get off topic :)

Kyzteke
Dec. 21, 2009, 04:47 PM
And my point is, so what? The OP simply asked, seemingly in the spirit of learning and getting input from more knowledgeable folks (though such input should always be taken with a grain of salt on a forum like this!) about appropriate discipline for a specific circumstance. The OP did NOT ask 'should my daughter ride this pony?' The OP did NOT ask for your unilateral judgment on 'the body' of her posts- which frankly, continue to come across as a big 'tsk tsk' from you to the poster, how dare she start all these threads seeking advice?

As you noted earlier- when one posts in these parts, one is fair game for whatever response anyone wants to give. That goes for the OP- and it goes for you, too!:)

Indeed -- and in the "spirit of learning" she doesn't seem to "get" that the pony is having the same problem over and over again, does she?

It seems you have an issue with me, so Life goes on, doesn't it? And I can't help but notice that the OP is no where to be found on any of these well meaning posts, so I guess maybe she doesn't quite have the spirit of learning you suggest.

My sympathy is always with the horse, and if you'd be acquainted with the prior posts (but, "so what?" you say....) you would know this is not a new problem.

And I agree, you really have gotten off topic....if you don't like my advise or postings I strongly urge you to simply not read them.

We all certainly have those options, don't we?;)