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Lord Helpus
Oct. 29, 2009, 11:50 AM
I am having some long fence lines replaced. The one in question was very old and it had a place where I could crawl through to feed and hay the retiree's in their field.

The new fence lines will be 3 rail, post and rail with a strand of electric wire on top. No way for me to get through or over easily.

I can put a gate in at that end -- but the downside is:
1. having to unattach the electric wire (scares me just enough that I hate to do it) each time,
2. open the gate into a group of horses, and
3. fight off hungry horses with my arms full of buckets.

I see this as a recipe for me getting hurt and/or horses getting loose.

The alternative I am thinking of, but I have never put one in myself, is what I am calling a "pass through":

a 3' (approx) wide gap in the fence with a 4' (approx) wide section of fence directly (18" ?) in front of it, so that I can go in, turn L or R to get into the field, but the horses cannot get out.

Has anyone built such a pass through? Do they like it? Dislike it? What dimensions are the best? (The above dimensions are seeming a tad roomy now that I think about it...)

I LOVE the idea of not having to open and close gates when I am feeding and blanketing!!! It makes my life 100 times easier.

Any other suggestions? I have also seen an inverted "V" used instead of a straight section. Opinions?

Thanks!

Lori B
Oct. 29, 2009, 11:53 AM
Be careful!

I have a friend who has a somewhat similar sounding setup to make it easier to get into an adjoining field. A few years ago, a weanling went through the passthrough and almost got killed by the gelding in that field. Yikes.

This is a long way of saying that I would want to be very sure that the passthrough didn't in anyway tempt a horse to try to get through, and that you weren't ever going to count on it to confine critters (foals, ponies) who could wiggle through.

FairWeather
Oct. 29, 2009, 11:55 AM
I'm having a pass-through put in on my last section of fence, and will do the inverted-v shape for safety reasons.

Sleepy
Oct. 29, 2009, 12:03 PM
I did. It worked pretty well. If I had to do it over, I would probably make mine bigger. None of my retirees wore blankets, so I wasn't caring anything in/out besides a halter/lead over my shoulder or a couple of wormers or a syringe of something. But if you're planning on carrying buckets or blankets or other stuff, you want it big enough to walk through carrying that stuff. The size of a door (whatever that is) would be good. I'm thinking mine is just 2 feet, just wide enough for a person. Really needs to be 3 or so.

And mine isn't a gap in the fence, it's a u-shape. Saw this on a farm somewhere else, my folks loved it and built it into the front fence line. It just isn't big enough.

dressagetraks
Oct. 29, 2009, 12:05 PM
I have one that has worked very well. It is at the end of the fence line, however, and is built a little differently. The gap is absolutely at the end of the fence line at the corner, so there is no turning either way to get in - I read this helps make them more small horse proof, as horses can't angle in the corner to align themselves for escape. I'll try to draw it but am lousy at stick art, so view periods as just place holders.

. . . ________
. . . . . . . . . |
_________. . |
. . . . . . . . . |
. . . . . . . . . |
. . . . . . . . . |

Both gaps are about 18 inches only, and the fence section in front is much longer than the gap, several feet longer. It is a tight passageway.

No horse, including a foal/weanling, has ever made it through, although one weanling investigated and gave up.

tabula rashah
Oct. 29, 2009, 12:07 PM
I know several people that have them and if I had a type of fence that allowed it, I would definitely have them as well. They are definitely a great time saver!

lovemyoldguy
Oct. 29, 2009, 12:11 PM
We had an inverted V pass through in our fence, and it worked very well except for the day that our old Appaloosa gelding, who was very narrow and also VERY pissed at being left behind for an hour, burst through the pass through and came trotting after us. :lol: That's the only time it ever happened...but keep in mind that with a really motivated horse, it can happen. (Of course, a really motivated horse can also go over/thru the fence itself.) We really did love that pass through, though - so much easier than dealing with gates.

Bluey
Oct. 29, 2009, 12:18 PM
I guess that you have considered feeding over the fence, so horses don't fight and you may find yourself in the middle of that.
Best would be not to need at all to go in there to feed and, once the horses are settled with their meal, you can go thru the gate and do whatever you need to any one without being in a mob situation.

I wonder if you can safely make one large enough to go thru with buckets and hay and such?
They generally are made just wide enough for people to walk thru sideways, but too narrow to be carrying stuff.

Those people walkways are nice to have, but they are one more place for something to happen, unnecessary risk if you don't absolutely need to have it.

Lord Helpus
Oct. 29, 2009, 12:32 PM
I'm having a pass-through put in on my last section of fence, and will do the inverted-v shape for safety reasons.


When will yours be put in? My new fence is going in next week -- I have a feeling that I will not get to see yours before I have to decide on mine...

Hypothetically speaking, if the opening in the fence line is 3' with both a straight panel and a "V", and if the space between the fenceline and the inner posts is 18" for both types of pass thru's,

then, a flat panel pass through would be 4' - 5' long and 18" into the field.

While a "V" would be ? long on each side and how far would it need to extend into the field?

The primary safety benefits to the "V" are: ?

-- I am guessing that, from the side, the "V" has dimension and is easier for a horse to see and not run into. But, are there other safety benefits of the "V" over the flat panel?

dressage traks, I cannot understand your diagram. Are you showing 2 fields or just one? Is your pass thru a short section of fence offset in the corner, but with no corresponding section placed in front of it?

I will play around with that with rails on the ground.

SMF11
Oct. 29, 2009, 12:34 PM
I have them in two of my fields. I use them occasionally (I put them at the bottom of the fields so if I wanted to get out down there I wouldn't have to trek back to the top and retrace steps). So mine aren't for carrying blankets through (though my thought on this is to just make the pass through narrow and toss the blankets on top of the fenceline, walk through the pass through, and pick up the blankets from the other side -- unless the electric makes this impossible).

Mine look like Dressagetraks', except instead of being in a corner they are in the fenceline so the top line is straight, instead of at a right angle.

In order to make it less appealing, I put a fencepost by itself a foot? away from the middle of the gap. I'll try to "draw" it:


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x___________________________
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .x
_____________________x


The x's are fenceposts.


That's probably enough, but I also put a board across the top and bottom. A person has to step over the bottom board, and under the top board and then go between the two fence posts.

SMF11
Oct. 29, 2009, 12:36 PM
never mind, fixed drawing!

dressagetraks
Oct. 29, 2009, 12:43 PM
The pasture is below and to the left. The yard is above. The fence line, actually the property boundary fence line, is on the right. You cannot go any further right than that vertical line, whether you are in the pasture or in the yard. If the pass through were not there, the lower of the horizontal solid fence lines (the pasture/yard fence) would just extend that extra 18 inches and make a normal corner. The upper fence "segment" is actually in the yard, not part of the pasture fence.

As it was explained to me by somebody who had had a few different styles, this design is the least escapable. She had a horse once who could manage to angle and wiggle self to fit through the gap (picture a horse maneuvering rump over to enter the gap on a sharp angle, were the corner not there). This design eliminated that. Not a statistical scientific survey, but this was in her foal field, and not even foals had managed to get out. I've had no problems with it myself.

Yard . . . . . . . . . . . . . |
. . . __________________| This is the extra fence piece, actually in the yard.
. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . |
_________________. . . . | This is the pasture/yard fence, gap of 18 inches right at the corner.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .|
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .|
Pasture. . . . . . . . . . . . .|

Xanthoria
Oct. 29, 2009, 08:25 PM
Sounds like you need a kissing gate. Very popular where I am from (Wales) and very useful. Some have a spring and others just operate on gravity to stay shut. Often they are built of local slate (the outsides) and wood (the gate part) or metal.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kissing_gate

A stile would also work:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stile

TheJenners
Oct. 29, 2009, 08:34 PM
We had the V at one place, and only had one naughty donkey who would wiggle through when he was young. NAUGHTY DONKEY!!

I built something similar at my old place, only it was a gap with a pole in the middle and to the inside. Kind of like this, I guess?

---------------O
--------------O O---------------

(Dunno if that will work??)

Never had an escape.

JSwan
Oct. 29, 2009, 08:53 PM
You can find measurements for stiles on the Internet.

Here is a link to several designs that you can use to build your stiles. Also includes a list of materials for each type of stile.

http://handbooks.btcv.org.uk/handbooks/content/section/2368

I seem to recall an extension site that had a design on it as well - you might try googling as I found it on-line.

birdsong
Oct. 29, 2009, 09:08 PM
Mine is just as someone else mentioned and happened out of necessity. Couldn't imagine not having it now after 20 years!

Had a small section that was too short to really bother with continuing the fence so just added 2 posts equally distanced to take up the space. Not enough for the horses to get their shoulders through but enough for me.

I NEVER have to open a gate unless its to move the horses or drive through.

kookicat
Oct. 30, 2009, 08:16 PM
How does the V work? Does the point of the V face the fence line or into the field?

SMF11
Oct. 30, 2009, 08:41 PM
How does the V work? Does the point of the V face the fence line or into the field?

The top of the V (the two ends) are the fenceline, with the gap. The bottom point of the V is the freestanding fencepost on the outside of the field. I hope I've understood your question correctly!

Fairview Horse Center
Oct. 30, 2009, 08:53 PM
I just have a gap about 9"? apart. Easy for a person to slip thru, but not a horse.

As an extra precaution, we have a single sliding board across the gap about stall guard height. We can slide the board, go in and out, then slide the board across again when we are done.

Baby
Oct. 30, 2009, 09:01 PM
we have many kissing gates here on the yard. they're excellent and really safe. the other thing we have is sort of a step up so you can step over the fence... worth a thought

poltroon
Oct. 30, 2009, 09:02 PM
So how do you envision having the electric span the pass-through?

What about just having a regular but very narrow gate, set up under the electric, with the plan that you open the gate, duck under, do your thing, and then come back through? You could set it up with a simple latch and even spring-load it so you could shove it open without needing careful hand work, and it would close and latch behind you. The top electric strand keeps it from being an escape route even if they could open it.

Lord Helpus
Oct. 31, 2009, 01:16 AM
So how do you envision having the electric span the pass-through?

What about just having a regular but very narrow gate, set up under the electric, with the plan that you open the gate, duck under, do your thing, and then come back through? You could set it up with a simple latch and even spring-load it so you could shove it open without needing careful hand work, and it would close and latch behind you. The top electric strand keeps it from being an escape route even if they could open it.

Of course that is an option -- and I have that already in another paddock. I feel like I am doing the limbo inder the electric which is on the top of the 5' posts (I am 5'10"). If I do not re-chain it once I am inside, I worry that the horses might forget the electric and make a break for it. So it is far more time consuming than a pass through/style.

The fencing man is used to leaving a 14" gap next to a run in shed for a pass through, but that won't work here. The run in shed is at the other end, in the opposite fence line of this long 5 acre field.

I like the sideways V style in the Wikipedia link. And I will also go to the link given for more ideas. Who knew that there were so many options?

I don't know about other people, but I ain't fitting through no 9" gap! :winkgrin:

Fairview Horse Center
Oct. 31, 2009, 02:20 AM
I don't know about other people, but I ain't fitting through no 9" gap! :winkgrin:

Actually I just measured my gap. It is 12", and the perfect size for ME to easily slip thru. I bet most CAN fit thru a 9" gap, because I am probably at LEAST 100 lbs more than most people ;)

buschkn
Nov. 1, 2009, 11:52 PM
The kissing gate and the stiles are very cool ideas. Hmmm. Now I want one! :) I have 4 board 5' fences and don't have electric on top. I feed over/through the fence and for blanketing I just toss them on the top rail and climb over. the electric definitely makes that strategy problematic.

These are some great ideas. The DIY link has a cool "squeeze" V shaped stile that looks perfect. Wider at the top so for shlepping blankets through etc could work, but the limbo game would still be in effect.

If you go with the stile idea/step through you could but those longer extensions for the electric to go up an extra foot or so, to give more clearance if necessary to not have to be ducking with blanets, feed, wormers, et al. Either way, we need pics when its done... :)