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View Full Version : How do you dry your blankets in winter?



KPF
Oct. 27, 2009, 10:00 AM
It seems like we always get a few back to back days of nasty wet weather in VA in the winter. My horses come in at night, they're out all day. So, how do you dry your turnout blankets/sheets overnight so they can be worn again the next day? Last year I hung them on the crossties but that is sort of a pain... I'm trying to come up with a better plan for this year. (My house is too far away from my barn to take them in the house or garage to dry, and the tack room is not heated.)

Does anyone use these? http://www.smartpakequine.com/productclass.aspx?productClassid=4218 If so, do they work? I've thought about buying them since I could just hang them up high in my aisle.

Thoughts???

myhorsefaith
Oct. 27, 2009, 10:33 AM
are they waterproof & breathable turnouts?

In the wet seattle area, every barn i've been to just keeps them on the horses when they come in. give 'em extra hay and the horse's body heat will dry those way faster than hanging them.

unless they are soaked through- if the horse is wet underneath then that obviously is not a good idea.

Brockstables
Oct. 27, 2009, 12:39 PM
If one blanket is wet, they are all wet! We hang ours on baling twine stretched like clotheslines in the never-used hallway with decent ventilation. I can hang about 10 blankets in there with room for air to circulate.

KPF
Oct. 27, 2009, 02:19 PM
Yes, they are waterproof turnouts, what I'm referring to is when they come in from soaking rain and are a little damp under even the most waterproof of blankets, so leaving them on isn't an option. Plus on very cold nights they get stable blankets-- I have two older guys who have trouble keeping weight on. So sometimes they may only need a TO sheet during the rainy day, but need a stable blanket at night.

Brockstables, I have a 12x12 storage room and was also thinking about doing a "clothes line" to dry them in there... not sure how many I can dry that way though. I can do one horse sized one and one pony sized one on the crossties in my aisle, but need room to dry more.

I'd love to hear from someone that has tried those hangers I referenced from SmartPak... really wondering if they're worth it because they could hang up high in the aisle and fold out of the way.

ChocoMare
Oct. 27, 2009, 02:35 PM
I read a tip somewhere about a woman who installed a Retractable Clothesline. This way, when she needed to hang a blanket, she had an instant clothesline.

A few options:

--Versaline Clothes Line (http://www.clotheslineshop.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=A&Product_Code=01002&Category_Code=House) - multiple lines

--Whitney Design Line (http://www.thestoragestore.com/40ftclothline.html) - single line

--Moorman Dual Line (http://www.urbanclotheslines.com/product/MM88349) - dual line

:D

Trevelyan96
Oct. 27, 2009, 02:53 PM
It seems like we always get a few back to back days of nasty wet weather in VA in the winter. My horses come in at night, they're out all day. So, how do you dry your turnout blankets/sheets overnight so they can be worn again the next day? Last year I hung them on the crossties but that is sort of a pain... I'm trying to come up with a better plan for this year. (My house is too far away from my barn to take them in the house or garage to dry, and the tack room is not heated.)

Does anyone use these? http://www.smartpakequine.com/productclass.aspx?productClassid=4218 If so, do they work? I've thought about buying them since I could just hang them up high in my aisle.

Thoughts???

I have them in my barn. You have to hang them really high, (or maybe it seems so to me because I'm vertically challanged :lol:). They work about the same as a basic clothesline, as long as its not too cold, the blankets will dry over night. I just swing them out from the wall so there's plenty of airflow between them. I was afraid they would sag and not hold the weight of a mid weight turnout blanket, but they do just fine.

And I hear ya... I'm in MD and the weather fluctuations around here make blanketing a royal PITA. Mine are nekkid today because I didn't have time to knock the mud off and get them dry this morning before going to work.

Another shortcut I picked up is to hose the horses off, sheet and all, when they're really muddy, then just hang them up to dry.

chancy deal
Oct. 27, 2009, 08:56 PM
Hanging in the barn is fine, but what do you do if the temp is below 32?
Dont they freeze, rather than dry?
I have a heated tack room that I hang mine in, but honestly.... I leave them on the horse and come morning the blankets are dry and the horses are warm and content. Though the outer shell is wet, the blanket still traps the animals body heat and they dry pretty quickly. Even if there is a little dampness under the blanket, which is rare.

IFG
Oct. 27, 2009, 09:30 PM
I agree with drying on the horse if possible. One approach is to put a polarfleece under the damp sheet. It keeps the horse warm, and lets the horse's body temp warm and dry the sheet. I only have one beast, so I bring really wet sheets inside the house to the basement with the de-humidifier. I love those things.

jollytrak
Oct. 27, 2009, 10:24 PM
more versatile than the swinging blanket bar is using the gladiator gear track from sears and using the utility hook to hold the blankets (sears also has another model that isn't as expensive that would work too, versa track i believe). http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00959441000P?keyword=gladiator+acces sories and you can use any type hook, i like the utility hook or the one for hoses. the utility one http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00959050000P?keyword=gladiator+acces sories holds turnouts really well with the ring at the withers :) with the body heat of three horses, the barn is toasty -- and i live in SD!

I have mine hung in the wash rack so when all the rain and snow melts, it goes down the drain and doesn't create a mess some where else. In the summer I'll hang fly sheets, coolers, etc. or bridles while tacking up.

KPF
Oct. 28, 2009, 11:40 AM
ooh... jollytrak, now THAT is a cool idea and one I'd have never thought of. THIS is why I love COTH! :)

Will go to Sears and check that out... it'd be more versatile and less expensive than the blanket dryers from Smartpak.

Thanks! :D

msj
Oct. 28, 2009, 11:55 AM
Does anyone use these? http://www.smartpakequine.com/productclass.aspx?productClassid=4218 If so, do they work? I've thought about buying them since I could just hang them up high in my aisle.

Thoughts???

I do use those and they do work BUT they are hanging right over the baseboard heater in the tack room. I do agree that unless your horse is wet underneath your turnout to leave them on the horse if at all possible. Obviously if you need to remove a wet turn out to ride, the water will just soak through. Course if you did like I did and bought a brand new TO from Schneider's only to find it soaked through even on the horse, then you're screwed. :( :(

I returned it 2 wks ago and haven't heard anything. They are on my agenda today to find out WTF they are doing about it.

mkevent
Oct. 28, 2009, 07:33 PM
I agree with the leave it on the horse option if at all possible. Obviously, if the rain is over, you still need a place to dry the blankets before putting them away.

What I did in my barn is use the single J shaped hooks designed for hanging bicycles or heavy things and installed them high on the door frame of my center aisle barn at both ends. Since all my blankets have tail straps, I simply put the tail strap through a rake and hoist it up onto the J hook. It can get a bit heavy if it's a soaked blanket, but it does work. On a breezy day with both sliding barn doors open, the blankets can dry pretty quickly.

Gotta say the Sears idea looks really good, too...

Lord Helpus
Oct. 29, 2009, 03:05 PM
I bought swing out saddle racks from ebay that I put up high by each horse's stall. They are similar to
these:

http://cgi.ebay.com/Tough-1-Swivel-Wall-Saddle-Rack_W0QQitemZ260497741017QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_De faultDomain_0?hash=item3ca6e014d9

But mine are plain black tubing and were cheaper. (They are probably still on ebay -- I just did not look through every page to find them.)

I put them up high enough so that blankets will not hit the floor, so I have to stand on a little stool to hang them, but I love the system.

The hangers are out of the way all year and each stall has one, so there is no pile of wet blankets in one place.

[I got the idea from the last barn that I was at which had the fancy blanket hangers which the OP linked to. Those are so big -- unnecessarily big -- that they get in the way all year round. All you need is a short stem to hang the chest piece over.]

MistyBlue
Oct. 29, 2009, 04:02 PM
Maybe sitting nearby with a cup of coffee and a leafblower to help speed things along for a short while before leaving them to dry overnight?
Also wring, wring, wring them out. The more water left in them, the longer it takes to dry.

Lord Helpus
Oct. 29, 2009, 05:59 PM
Maybe sitting nearby with a cup of coffee and a leafblower to help speed things along for a short while before leaving them to dry overnight?
Also wring, wring, wring them out. The more water left in them, the longer it takes to dry.


MistyBlue,

The picture of you sitting in your barn aisle with a cup of coffee in one hand an a leaf blower in the other, spraying your wet turnouts absolutely cracks me up. Not that it is a bad idea -- I think it's sitting down with the cup of coffee part that makes me laugh.

Especially on a rainy, ugly night with smelly wet horses when the barn is the last place I want to be spending *quality* time in the evening. :D

mothermucker12
Nov. 1, 2009, 07:33 AM
how about using tack cleaning hooks?

Thokki
Nov. 1, 2009, 07:59 PM
I put some nails up on a barn beam out of the traffic area and hang the two I have stretched from the rings where the leg strap clips attach. The problem is getting them to dry. Unheated barn, so when it is around the freezing mark and raining, nothing dries! At that point I have to haul them to the basement in the house. Since my guys have very heavy coats, I only use them when it is around the freezing mark and blowing horizontal rain for a long time. Probably more for my comfort, since I don't think they have ever been soaked to the skin! They are Tuffrider fleece lined rain sheets. More useful in winter to put on the horse after riding so they can dry off, as they are out 24/7 with a big run in.

mothermucker12
Nov. 2, 2009, 09:01 PM
forgot to mention i usually just leave them on, or switch blankets completely

Cloverbarley
Nov. 2, 2009, 11:05 PM
Buy Rambos. They don't leak or get wet underneath. Blankets always dry better when still on the horse but obviously would never leave a blanket that is not totally waterproof and leaks on a horse overnight. Good blankets are worth their weight in gold. :)

KPF
Nov. 3, 2009, 09:13 AM
Cloverbarley, some of mine are Rambos... to me, regardless of quality, you do sometimes have days where the rain is so heavy that even under the best blanket they are a bit damp. That doesn't happen very often, so the biggest issue for me is that I often need to switch a wet TO sheet for a heavier stable blanket at night for my oldies.

I think I'm going to try the Sears versatrak thing and see how that works... thanks everyone for the suggestions!:)

jollytrak
Nov. 3, 2009, 10:13 PM
kpf... if you find the versa trak/gladiator rack is too long, they're easy to cut with a miter saw :) i hung mine with 2 inch wood screws! good luck :)

jazzrider
Nov. 4, 2009, 10:37 AM
I just have a tack cleaning hook strung with baling twine from an eye hook in my wash bay so it can be raised an lowered easily. Way cheaper than other gizmos.

I will say though, I only use it when I know they won't need the blankets again the next day. If they need them on the next day, I just leave the blankets on them. They dry out in just a few hours that way -- usually by the late night check. But then most of mine are well waterproofed and don't soak through.

War Admiral
Nov. 7, 2009, 09:22 AM
I do what my mommy wouldn't let me do when I was a kid: I bring 'em in the house and hang 'em over a door! :lol: I have 2 sets of blankets, so I can take the wet one off horse, put a fresh dry one on, bring the wet one up to the house overnight, then switch them out again the next day.

betsyk
Nov. 9, 2009, 10:44 AM
Box fans. Mine come home to hang in the basement with the box fans from the stalls in summer pointed right on them. And the dehumidifier cranked. They STINK for a while, but it works. We have spares so if they're soaked enough to come home overnight I don't have to run back out in the am to put them back on. I would think you could point your box fans on them when they're hanging in your barn, too. Key to bringing them home is to brush the mud off before you take the blanket off the horse (as much as possible) and have a couple big rubbermaid totes available so when you put them in your car they're not dripping all over everything. Garbage bags would work in a pinch.

Black Points
Nov. 18, 2009, 11:42 PM
Jollytrak,

Took your advice and got the Sears versa track. But how do you get the blanket off the hook without the hook coming off too. Or am I doing something wrong. My hook slides on the track nicely but it comes off too easily.

Mary in western NY
http://www.BPEquine.com

KitKat987
Nov. 19, 2009, 09:24 AM
Assuming they are still waterproof and the horse for the most part is dry underneath, I leave them on. I've dragged them into the house, hung them in the barn, the garage, and I'm lucky if the tops are actually dry the next day if they got a good soaking. But if left on the horse, they'll be dry as a bone in a couple hours at most.

wendy
Nov. 19, 2009, 09:49 AM
wow why don't you go with nature, as in, horses don't need blankets? a wet rug or a real horse with quick-drying fur? no brainer.

KPF
Nov. 19, 2009, 09:54 AM
wendy, no offense but why don't you ask my two twenty-something geldings if they'd rather have a sheet or blanket on in freezing rain or just stand out in it all day and shiver all their weight off??? :confused:

I'm not the sort to leave horses in unless it is really bad outside and I do have two old guys who are getting to be hard keepers, thus, I blanket. No brainer.

*JumpIt*
Nov. 19, 2009, 10:17 AM
I leave the blankets on the horses, I feed at 4-5 then come back around 9-10 and pull the blankets (now dry) off and put on stable blankets.

wendy
Nov. 19, 2009, 10:17 AM
so um, why not water-proof blankets? i don't get it. If the blankets need to be dried on a regular basis they need to be thrown out. They aren't doing your horses any good.

KPF
Nov. 19, 2009, 11:12 AM
They ARE waterproof blankets. It's just that on the rare occasion we get monsoon-like rain, they still get a little damp underneath under the best of blankets. More often, the reason I need to take them off is because they needed a TO sheet on during the day but night time temps are low so they need a stable blanket. Thus why I can't leave the wet sheet on. This is not a regular occurence, just happens every so often and it is frustrating to try to dry the blankets overnight when it does happen.

I wish I still had younger horses and didn't have to worry about blanketing, but like I said, my old guys are getting up there and they need to be blanketed to keep from shivering weight off. (I also have a young, fat welsh pony that doesn't get a blanket ever, at all, unless it is really cold and wet outside, and then normally all she gets is a sheet.)

kookicat
Nov. 19, 2009, 11:41 AM
I have a drying room. ;)

Well, it's more like a cubby where my hot water tank is for the tackroom, but there's enough space to hang a couple of rugs and get them dried out.

wildlifer
Nov. 19, 2009, 04:06 PM
We put them in the dryer. You have to walk from the house to barn anyway, why not carry a couple blankets?

TheOrangeOne
Nov. 19, 2009, 11:17 PM
Every barn I have been in has taken a very long nail and put it in only partially (an inch or so) at the top of the wooden stalls, above the grating. You close the front of the blanket, toss it up onto the nail (which I am told gets easier if you are doing it on a regular basis, I am short and not great with throwing things, so it took me a couple tries). Super cheap, up too high for anyone to run into it accidentally, and most of the blanket is hanging by the stall bars so it gets better ventilation that way.

Foxtrot's
Nov. 19, 2009, 11:57 PM
And to think some people were bemoaning the passing of the heavy, old New Zealand blankets in the thread of products we used to love. Love the lightweight, washable, easy-dry features of modern blankets. Those old things were heavy, never dried, got caked in mud and stiff as boards....we live on the wet coast.

cyndi
Nov. 20, 2009, 08:20 AM
I have the blanket bars you've referenced. I put them very high up (near the ceiling) in my tack room, so i can hang blanket from the closed neck and they still dont' touch the ground. This way, when I do not NEED them to dry wet blankets, they are totally out of the way.

When my blankets are wet, I let them hang in the barn until they've 'dripped dry' and then I move them to my tack room, and put the heater on full blast AND the dehumidifier. I live in a very humid climate, and they would NEVER get dry overnight otherwise.

Arcadien
Nov. 20, 2009, 08:29 AM
I drape mine over the stair banister in the Great Room.

As they dry a lovely musty horsey smell fills the house - goes nicely with the water leaking all over the kitchen floor from the slowly defrosting hoses.

Works great but some friends have mentioned it may be one more reason why I'm still single... :) :)

msj
Nov. 20, 2009, 08:30 AM
I have the blanket bars you've referenced. I put them very high up (near the ceiling) in my tack room, so i can hang blanket from the closed neck and they still dont' touch the ground. This way, when I do not NEED them to dry wet blankets, they are totally out of the way.

I've got the same set up in my tack room and I use a 2-step ladder to hang the TO. Yesterday we had an all day rain and my horse came in covered in mud from head to toe and his TO was coated. Since the temps weren't too bad (55 degrees), I just took him outside and turned the hose on him and the TO. Took the TO off, hung it up on the blanket bars and turned the heat way up to about 78 degrees. It was still a bit damp this AM so I just turned the heat back down and I know it will be dry by this evening. :) Course that's why my horses have 2 lightweights TO each cause both LOVE to roll in the mud. :sigh:

msj
Nov. 20, 2009, 08:32 AM
I drape mine over the stair banister in the Great Room.

As they dry a lovely musty horsey smell fills the house - goes nicely with the water leaking all over the kitchen floor from the slowly defrosting hoses.

Works great but some friends have mentioned it may be one more reason why I'm still single... :) :)


:lol: :lol: You just need to find yourself a true horseMAN! They would understand completely. :D

Horsepower
Nov. 20, 2009, 08:52 AM
Another option is to put them on the hood of your car overnight in the garage. This spreads them out and also the heat from the car hood (having just driven there with the blankets in a large bucket to protect the car) helps to dry them faster. I also opt for putting them in the dryer if needed.