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Hunter's Rest
Oct. 25, 2009, 02:15 PM
I have a 80 x 150 riding arena with footing. 1/3rd of the ring is bordered by a 3 board fence from the adjacent pasture. The rest of it is just lined with telephone poles (to outline it and hold in the footing.)
I've been thinking about putting up a fence of some sort so it 'feels' safer to my little students and to avoid escapees if someone comes off. (The ring is 'in' another pasture, so they don't go far if they get loose.)
I had someone say they didn't like the thought I'd had for a single oak board (painted black, like the other 100s of miles of fence on the property) 'in case a rider fell off into the fence!'. Now, that said, I hate to argue the point and say 'it's never happened before' and have it happen.
But my question is this - *lots* (tons) of farms have single board fencing around their ring, right? On regular half round posts. I'd probably put the board facing into the arena (not out) but what other safety things should I think about?
Or does anyone have a better idea? I thought about rubber fence rails (black, I'd prefer) but those would be on wood posts, too, so not sure the safety. I know there are plastic rails on plastic type posts, but I'm just at a loss.
Can anyone offer their thoughts/solutions?
Cost is DEFinitely an issue. I have a bunch of leftover oak boards and posts available, so I sort of wanted to use them up ...

ayrabz
Oct. 25, 2009, 06:29 PM
Sounds to me, from your description, that I personally would be happy with the fact it was still 'contained' by a fenceline further out....(unless of course, its huge huge huge, for the little ones?)
I've just completed our fencing, but our property is SMALL...and the 'arena' has to double as turnout when rotating is needed, (Black Ramm 3 flex rail, but with top hot coat rail) so I'm already (!!) laughing at myself, that once my horse hits the electrified top rail of the 'dressage' arena, he'll be ruined, and :sadsmile:never go deep in corners again, I guess! DUHHHHHH me.

Hunter's Rest
Oct. 25, 2009, 08:02 PM
How much is the ramm fence, for just one rail, and what sort of posts?

BasqueMom
Oct. 25, 2009, 08:24 PM
Hi,

Don't know the cost of Ramm, but it wounds like you could get by with a 1/2 roll of flexible
fence. Some of Centaur's products come in half rolls. With one gate, provided it was by the existing fence, you could get by with one tensioner. If it's not, then you will need two.

subk
Oct. 25, 2009, 09:42 PM
I had someone say they didn't like the thought I'd had for a single oak board (painted black, like the other 100s of miles of fence on the property) 'in case a rider fell off into the fence!'. Now, that said, I hate to argue the point and say 'it's never happened before' and have it happen.
But my question is this - *lots* (tons) of farms have single board fencing around their ring, right?
Every ring ever done that is contained by fencing poses the risk that someone is going to fall into the fence. I think though that the new improved safety for novices is greater than the new risk of falling in the fence--by a big margin! Just tell the sceptic that yes, there is that risk but you're making it much less likely that someone will fall off in the first place!

Hunter's Rest
Oct. 25, 2009, 10:02 PM
Good point, Susan!
Other problem - the arena is not quite 'square'. It'll have 2 square corners, plus the other, already-in corner (3 board, exisiting) but the other corner follows a little curve of the drainage ditch so it'll have a couple breaks in the straight run. Will that need a tensioner at each 'corner'?
How do you attach ramm (etc) fence to a post? Can I use half rounds, or whatever, or do you need the special ramm posts?
Cost cost cost.

jazzrider
Oct. 26, 2009, 04:46 PM
Just one thought on using just a single top rail -- our ring sound similar to yours (in the corner of a pasture with two sides not fenced for quite some time). When we finally did the remaining fencing we started with just the top rail since we were doing it ourselves on the weekends. My two mischief-makers (I have a herd of five) actually made it under that top rail :no:. I wasn't there, so I didn't see it. But I came home to the two of them locked in the ring (not sure why they didn't just go out the same way! :lol:).

So if you're just going to do a top rail for cost sake, I would buy some horse-no-climb wire fencing from Tractor Supply to add to it, just to be safe. Or maybe do two rails rather than one. :)

Lady Counselor
Oct. 26, 2009, 05:05 PM
^^
Agree with that. If using one rail, add the no climb fence, or do two rails. You don't want an accident where a horse gets under one rail and panic ensues.

sidepasser
Oct. 26, 2009, 07:25 PM
Here's my arena fence which is also contained within another fence of a two acre paddock around it.

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y140/Sidepasser/farm/Ridingarenafrontlongsideview907.jpg

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y140/Sidepasser/farm/ArenapaintedwithAsphaltpaintSept.jpg

It is six feet tall, so unless the horse is a real monster - it isn't going to abandon ship and leave the premises. As far as getting thrown on the fence, well one has to take a few chances in life otherwise stay inside on the couch and hibernate. Our littles that take lessons here like the containment factor plus the fence can take a bit of abuse.

My arena is a large dressage arena in size.

Boards are oak and are painted with waterproof asphalt paint (now that was a bigger pain than hand digging all those post holes!). Fence looks very nice and hope that it will last a while.

Hunter's Rest
Oct. 28, 2009, 09:30 AM
Sidepasser - that's not oak boards - what sort are they? I like the look. Just another paddock fence, really.
Where do you get the asphault paint? Is it oil based? I got some latex black yesterday to start re-doing all my fencing, but not sure I knew asphault based was an option. Does it last longer/tougher?

llsc
Oct. 28, 2009, 10:36 AM
Any fence is dangerous if you fall into it. At the horse shows in Vermont they have a single board about 2 1/2 feet high that is held in by a metal spike with a loop in the top that the board slips into. No one complained that it was dangerous, but it did cross my mind that I wouldn't want to fall on the metal part.

If I were you, I'd go with the fencing you already have. A single oak board will be fine.

I have stone pillars with cedar landscape timbers. The pillars are every 8 feet and if you fall into one it's really going to hurt. We own stone quarries, so the stone is a byproduct and the timbers are cheap at Lowes when you use a 10% off coupon. The major cost was in the stacking of the stone. It took 4 guys 3 days.

http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2972381700084673271IxLxpb

http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2664645180084673271jYfSJo

Chardavej
Oct. 28, 2009, 11:10 AM
I have square posts in the ground (painted white) and I bought the 2 inch white electric tape. I just ran the tape around all the outside of all the posts (though hindsight I should have ran it on the INSIDE) and stapled it to the posts.

There is no electric on it so if a horse hits it it's ok and if someone should fall on it it will collapse.

It also looks nice, clean with straight lines, almost looks like board from a distance. Was also fast, easy and cheap to do, plus no painting or maintenance. I like it a lot!

Wish I had pictures of it, if I find some I will upload them later.

sidepasser
Oct. 28, 2009, 12:48 PM
Sidepasser - that's not oak boards - what sort are they? I like the look. Just another paddock fence, really.
Where do you get the asphault paint? Is it oil based? I got some latex black yesterday to start re-doing all my fencing, but not sure I knew asphault based was an option. Does it last longer/tougher?

Yes they are oak, they are unfinished red oak with a few white oak boards thrown in due to not enough red to finish the job. I buy them at the my local lumber yard and pay .56 cents a running board foot for them. I won't use pine as board fence lumber, just doesn't last as long and easier for a horse to chew on them.

The black asphalt paint I got through TSC. You cannot put it into a regular sprayer as it is so thick, so it was hand painted on. Yes, it is a tar based type paint, and it lasts much longer than latex. It will soak into the wood so a second coat may be necessary if the wood is not treated. All my board fencing is red/white oak with two coats of asphalt paint. Costs more, but sure does last a long time.

mellsmom
Oct. 29, 2009, 10:21 AM
One side is three board oak. Ring is on top of hill in pasture. I had my builder come sink some posts for me.... about 15 or so of them around the arena area. Mine is actually slightly larger then 150 x 220. I bought the electric rope and the cool screw in rope holders and set up two strands of electric rope. I get the thicker one as it is less likely to cut them if they get into it. And trust me, if it's not hot, mine will! I won't use the tape.... run your finger across the top of it.... now think about if you hit it hard and slid across it! Yikes, it'd cut to the bone in a second. The thinner electric rope also scares me as it would be easy to get caught up in and it's thin enough to cut as well.

Cloverbarley
Oct. 29, 2009, 11:06 AM
Mine are fenced with Centaur 5" rails and cedar posts every 8'.

Hunter's Rest
Oct. 29, 2009, 02:35 PM
What I don't understand is *how* you attach the Ramm rubber rail, or the Centaur, or whatever non-wooden rail to a wooden post?
Cost is running neck and neck with attractiveness ....

Cloverbarley
Oct. 29, 2009, 03:55 PM
What I don't understand is *how* you attach the Ramm rubber rail, or the Centaur, or whatever non-wooden rail to a wooden post?
Cost is running neck and neck with attractiveness ....

With Centaur (and I assume with most other vinyl fencing) you screw two brackets/holders onto the post and the vinyl is sandwiched in between. What I love about Centaur (I have most of my farm fenced with it) is that it always looks clean and smart, you don't have to do any annual painting or suchlike, it's indestructible and it comes with a good long guarantee.