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Bluey
Oct. 24, 2009, 01:37 PM
I woke up at 2 am, in the funny way those that look after others have to wake up, bolting straight up and running to the West window to look before quite awake.
My window shows the barn, that is lighted with an overhead lamp and there, in the pens and under the barn, I could see some critters and for a minute could not tell what they were.
Then it dawned on me, those were wild hogs, roaming around there happily.:eek:

I could not see any horses, so turned the outside lights to the house on and, walking outside, could barely see the horses asleep in their sand pile by the yard fence.
At the same time, two big hogs and a half grown one trotted around the yard fence and stopped dead, as the horses woke up and saw the hogs and took off at a dead run into the night.
Even the 29 year old can run like the wind when startled, I noticed.

The hogs left in a wobbly run also, back to the main group under the barn and all left asap into the darkness.

I got a gun and went in the pickup to look for the horses, ideas of them running thru fences, or breaking legs in their hurry to get away from those smelly monsters.
Did I mention that the rank wild hog smell was overpowering?

I found the horses playing their giraffe impersonation at the end of the pasture, a mile from the house, but all fine and, once they decided it was me this time, looking for treats.:rolleyes:

I was thinking they won't come to the barn for breakfast this morning, but here they were, as if nothing had happened, waiting for their meal, no worse for their night flight.:cool:

I have been watching them very closely since then, but all seems fine, for now, other than I am still jittery and oh so thankful that nothing worse happened, after all.:no:

mlranchtx
Oct. 24, 2009, 01:46 PM
Not sure if you're a hunter or not but they are SO destructive.

My hubby shot about a 150lb sow last year. That was the BEST tasting pork I've ever eaten. Of course if you compare their diet to commercially raised pork, there's no question why it tastes so good..

They tore up one of our pastures so bad, when hubby was out on the tractor and didn't see one of the craters they wallowed out, the tractor hit it so hard it broke off the smoke stack.... :eek:

Bluey
Oct. 24, 2009, 01:53 PM
We are a wildlife preserve, no one hunts here.
Until a few years ago, we didn't have any feral hogs around, they are an introduced species, not native to this area.
Because of that, we can and really should try to at least control them.

They have been around here before, but not just in the barn, as they were last night.
I hope the horses get used to them, that wild flight into the dark is too dangerous for them or my heart:no:.

Good to know they make good sausage.;)

MistyBlue
Oct. 24, 2009, 01:53 PM
Nasty buggers...it's a rare horse that doesn't freak out over feral hogs.

Maybe they came back to the barn willingly because bacon might have been on the breakfast menu? :winkgrin:

Bluey
Oct. 24, 2009, 01:55 PM
Nasty buggers...it's a rare horse that doesn't freak out over feral hogs.

Maybe they came back to the barn willingly because bacon might have been on the breakfast menu? :winkgrin:

Thinking back to the way they smelled, I don't think I want to get close enough to one, no matter how good they may be cooked.:dead:

mlranchtx
Oct. 24, 2009, 01:57 PM
I hope for you that they were just passing through.

If they become a problem, it's very easy to make a trap for them with a couple of tall cattle panels and a few t-posts. I doubt you'd have any trouble getting rid of them. Post them on craigslist and some redneck will come get them :-) Since they are a feral animal and not a game animal, you can legally sell them even though they were "wild".

I'm not sure why that pig smell is so scary but horses seem to be terrified of them.

mlranchtx
Oct. 24, 2009, 01:59 PM
Thinking back to the way they smelled, I don't think I want to get close enough to one, no matter how good they may be cooked.:dead:

The boars are horrible. :eek: That sow that we butchered didn't smell bad at all.

MistyBlue
Oct. 24, 2009, 02:01 PM
They do stink to high heaven, especially if there were boars in the group.

My husband works for a German company and they have quite a few folks there who hunt boars for sport overseas. With dogs, from horseback. At one of the company dinner parties when they were over we got to talking horses (naturally, they love their horses and dogs!) and I was invited to come over and try boar hunting with them. I mentioned it wasn't common to find a horse that didn't freak out over boar smell, and one told me, "It takes a brave rider and even braver horse!" :lol: The men in the group who hunted board almost all had Gelderlanders, which gave me the giggles a bit because Gal was about 1/3 Gelderlander and was about as spooky as a horse can be over stuff like wildlife and woods. :winkgrin:

Foxtrot's
Oct. 24, 2009, 02:40 PM
My yearling is going to spend the winter at a place that is frequented by bears - just so that if he comes across a bear while I am riding him he does not do what Bluey's horses did! :D

It is actually beautiful up there right now - the sockeye are swimming in to spawn and there are flocks of seagulls and eagle waiting for the carcasses. There is a trail down to the creek and a bear has been lifting fish up onto the bank into a cache. The trees are a glorious colour and blueberry fields aflame.

Bluey
Oct. 24, 2009, 02:53 PM
I have some friends in NM that have an orchard.
That orchard is part of their horse's winter pasture.
In the fall, they have seen their horses drunk on overripe, fermenting apples, along with equally drunk bears and elk, all happily coexisting, some sleeping it off next to each other.:lol:

We have mountail lions, but they are relatively rare.
These new wild hogs really look and smell dangerous.
I don't blame the horses for reacting like they did.

We have had a couple of 4H pigs in a horse pen and stall and the horses didn't pay any attention.
These feral hogs are quite a different thing.:eek:

cloudyandcallie
Oct. 24, 2009, 03:09 PM
Send them here, Bluey, my horse, from europe, thinks they are pets. I was riding once with a friend and 2 wild hogs, tusks and all, came running past us. Friend and her horse freaked, my horse thought they were cute. of course he thinks gators are cute too.:eek:

Don't y'all still have some of the wild hogs that were wild, not feral, in Texas? Here, after a few generations in the wild, the feral hogs get tusks.

There's supposedly a few Florida pumas up around here also. I'm skeptical of the picture supposedly snapped by a wildlife camera, but still worried that a panther will like horsemeat. Glad we are overrun with deer here.

suze
Oct. 24, 2009, 05:43 PM
Scary! I saw a program on Discovery(?) or NatGeo maybe about the growing problem with feral hogs. Incredibly destructive and getting bolder all the time. They showed some guys who hunt with a breed of dog bred for the purpose of tracking hogs. Hope they don't think your place is an easy mark for goodies.

Bluey
Oct. 24, 2009, 06:55 PM
We only hand feed hay, no big bales, no grain, so don't know what hogs would like around here.
Hopefully they will just move on.

You can't imagine all the terrible scenarios of horses thru fences, all kinds of possible injuries to them, it was not good.
I took the gun to shoot any pig, if I could be certain of a shot in the dark, or to maybe have to shoot a terminally injured horse.:cry:
I still can't believe that they don't even seem too perturbed by last night.
You know the pens and under the barn still smells like those hogs.

I sure hope they were just passing by.:(

MistyBlue
Oct. 24, 2009, 08:29 PM
Cloudy, all loose hogs in the states are feral. We don't have native wild hogs. Although they're considered technically feral many are no different than other county's wild hogs. Many are the generational offspring of wild foreign hogs that were brought here and released for hunting purposes a couple centuries ago. But also many domestic swine will become wild looking after they get loose and are feral for a couple generations. By growing in size and adding tusks.
Some feral hogs reach ridiculously large sizes. They can be either timid as hell or mean as snot...depending on their moods at that time.
Hog dogs are very prized animals, but rarely pets. They're very aggressive but have to be considering what they do. A good hog hunter will have the leather or even kevlar vests for his grabber dogs. :eek: Keeps them from being bitten or gored.

Bluey, things that attract hog like crazy are acorns especially but any nuts (hickories, beechnuts, etc) fruit or orchards, veggie gardens, wild onions, lots of wild mushrooms...if you grow pumpkins or watermelons those can be hog magnets. Same with potatoes. Any rotten or older wood piles (grubs, bugs, small lizards, toads, etc hiding in there). They're not big on hay. Any carrion laying around will attract them too, they love meat as much as fruits, veggies and nuts. Also boggy, wet or swampy areas attract them.

Thankfull here in CT we really don't have them so much. Once in a rare while a domestic one or two will get loose but that's very rare. Some areas get some monstrous buggers though. :eek: I might llove wildlife, but I'm darned thankful I'll probably never run into a 600 lb pissed off tusker in the CT woods. Or even a group of 150 lb annoyed sows.

TX has a real problem with them...not only is it so large and so open that they can breed and survive well, there are tons of places that breed and keep them for hunting purposes and they get loose all over the place.
This guy was taken in TX:
http://brotherhood-of-catfishermen.com/catfish/messages/484/887722.jpg
These guys can get pretty big:
http://i115.photobucket.com/albums/n307/ford8n_2006/100_0106.jpg
http://media.economist.com/images/20081206/4908US3.jpg

Some of the top hog hunting is done in your state...around the country hunters travel there specifically for the Texan Tuskers!

RidingAllDay
Oct. 24, 2009, 10:32 PM
Misty:

How do you know all of this? :)

Why do horses freak out so much from wild hogs? Is it a ingrained behavior?

Why do they smell so bad?

How do the hunters on horseback kill the pigs? Guns or spears?

We have tons of acorns around, but I must not live in a wild pig area, thankfully.

MistyBlue
Oct. 24, 2009, 11:07 PM
Wildlife is my hobby, passion and part time job. :D
My other hobby and passion is maintaining ecosystems.
So even though we don't have much in the way of feral hogs here, it made sense to learn about them because they're seriously hell on natural ecosystems that they don't belong in. Very damaging.
Plus, they're fascinating on top of being stinky and creepy. :winkgrin:
The smell of carnivores creeps most horses out. Swine are omnivores...they eat meat and plants. And carrion and garbage because they're like 4 legged buzzards. Add in a boar's musk...and well, they kinda stink. And to horses, they stink like "it's gonna eat me!" :eek: :lol:
Hunters on horseback kill them with either a rifle or the dogs...the guys I''ve spoken with don't have hog dogs trained for killing...just for tracking, circling and holding. The hunters catch up to the dogs and shoot the animal with a rifle from what they've said. The horses apparently have no issues approaching a pissed off boar making a lot of noise and a bunch of loud dogs. Darned bold horses. :cool:
Where are you located...you'd be surprised at how many areas have feral hogs. VA has quite a few, a lot of VA residents are shocked when they hear that or finally see some.
The thing with feral hogs are, you'll see the damage they cause or possibly smell them once in a while...but not see them. They can be quite good at remaining unseen. Many times the only way you know one's been around is large chunks of ground churned up and freaked out pets.
Sows don't have a lot of smell, piglets don't have really any. Boars stink to high heaven.
Now as mean as they can be sometimes...or as huge as they can get...they don't really scare me. I'd be cautious as heck, but not terrified.
A shark, OTOH...well they'd find me dead of a heart attack. And that's even if I found one out of water on a trail in the woods, LOL!

Bluey
Oct. 25, 2009, 10:41 AM
We are in semi desert, so wild hogs here just don't have much to eat, no gardens, fields, etc.
In the canyons, they do have more to eat and protection, so there are more down there.

Hogs are cannibalistic, as I know someone that drove up to a windmill and there were some wild hogs there.
Stopped a little ways off and shot two, the rest ran off.
Waiting a little, the hogs came running back and started eating on the ones down, that may not have been quite dead yet.
The total shot, before the hogs realized what was happening and the rest left was 8 and that person told me it looked like a war zone with all those dead hogs lying around.

We have to understand that south of here, sometimes they have 400 in one peanut field, that will destroy the field in one night.

Those feral hogs are extremely destructive, not only to what humans do, but to wildlife, eating the nests of wild turkeys, quail, young deer and antilope and all and any they come up on.

Hogs are short sighted and bad tempered. I would not want to make one mad, or stand in their way.
Trucks even have been wrecked when hitting a hog, as they are like a big bowling ball and when you hit them, you lose control of your vehicle.

I sure hope they won't stay around here.:(
The horses were fine last night and are this moring.:)

pj
Oct. 25, 2009, 12:05 PM
Forty years ago when I moved here there was nothing but timber land for miles and miles around us. One morning I spotted a tiny little black pig who scuttled back into the woods when he saw me. I started putting out shelled corn and it wasn't too long til the piglet was greeting me happily each morning. We never tried to pen him but you could go out and holler John Henry and you'd hear him crashing through the woods acoming.
He grew and grew, black coarse hair, tusks to be in awe of but what a great pet he was.
He'd try to climb ladders after me. Followed me everywhere. Would flop on his back for a tummy rub. I really loved John Henry. They are SMART, too.
When people started building close to us I worried that he would hurt someone, not on pupose but he would do things like grab your britches leg and tug like a puppy. Not something someone not in the know would find amusing

I gave him to a man who raised hogs and was told later that two of his boars had broken through a fence and killed John Henry.

Don't know if Jc was an escaped domestic or a wild hog but if a domestic I can't imagine where he came from. I really have lots of good memories of that funny fellow though.

foundationmare
Oct. 25, 2009, 12:33 PM
Misty Blue, the size of those boars in your pics.....!!!!!! Yikes! And ugly to boot!

MistyBlue
Oct. 25, 2009, 12:37 PM
Yep, they're destructive as hell. To farmers, to wildlife and to ecosystems. They can destroy acres and acres of habitat with their rooting around in a short time. Which not only killls vegetation and homes for wildlife and avian nests, but also creates a lot of new erosion and run off issues.
But pj is right, they're smart as heck too. All pigs are smart, feral ones have a bit of extra smarts. However, I wouldn;t recommend trying to make friends them in general. :winkgrin: They have been known to cause serious human injury.

MistyBlue
Oct. 25, 2009, 12:47 PM
LOL Foundation Mare...you certainly don't want to run into a mad one of these anytime:
http://www.vhuntingandfishing.ro/hunting/wild_boars/wild_boars_2.jpg

Florida has a buttload of them, but at least there they have a couple predators that help out:
http://www.23mm.com/image/2006/small/boar.jpg
(not sure I'd want to run into that either though!)

And my husband's German coworkers hunt these frigging things from horseback:
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y172/MistyBlue5105/Field__Stream_wild_boar.jpg
That's a german wild boar. :eek: From horseback? I don't freaking think so! An armored tank....maybe.

Foxtrot's
Oct. 25, 2009, 01:35 PM
Ha, Misty. My daughter ws running in the Black Forest and saw a few of these hogs. She ran on and later was told that it was a rare sight, but that she was also lucky as they could be dangerous.

MistyBlue
Oct. 25, 2009, 02:51 PM
Good Lordy that must have been a surprise for your daughter! I would be able to run light speed if I saw one of those German Hogzillas! :lol:
I did hear they're not seen very often unless hunters are actively looking for them using tracking dogs. I think that's probably a good thing, LOL!

cloudyandcallie
Oct. 25, 2009, 03:13 PM
Bluey, I don't know when you moved to Texas, but there used to be native wild hogs there, called peccary, I finally remembered the name, or javalina. (We knew them as peccaries when I had friends in Texas.) Not feral but native wild species.

Ours here in GA are the feral hogs who revert to tusks and wild when they are turned loose in the swamps.

Cloudy grew up near the Schwartzwald and maybe saw them there. He and Callie were never afraid of them and she was a KY bluegrass girl.

Bluey
Oct. 25, 2009, 03:34 PM
We didn't have any here until the last few years.
The game warden had been warning us about them and they finally showed up.
They are not native to this part of the world and those just now showing up here are feral hogs, going by their studies.

cloudyandcallie
Oct. 25, 2009, 04:08 PM
Wild hogs usually won't bother anyone unless you get between a sow and her piglets.

You might get a friend from Louisiana to come visit with his/her catahoula leopard hounds, those guys are designed to chased and pen hogs. My father's friend Justin Wilson send a pair of those puppies to our friends in SC to handle the feral hog population. The dogs were too rough for our friends, much rougher than the wild hogs.:lol:

FLeckenAwesome
Oct. 25, 2009, 11:44 PM
Jeesh!! Those things are freakin' SCARY!!! They remind me of those things in the forest of evil or whatever it was on "The Princess Bride"! hee hee.. Those big rat things!!

I'm gonna have nightmares!!!!

FatPalomino
Oct. 26, 2009, 12:14 AM
Bluey- can you shot them if you continue to see them because of the game preserve you're in?

Those pictures are darn scary- I'd imagine they have almost no predators.

Years ago I read an article about the growing feral pig problem, actually in TX. Farmers would shoot them out of the pickup truck but could barely get a handle on the problem. I think they are a big problem in eastern Colorado, too. Thankfully not here, at least, no yet ;)

Glad to hear your horses are ok. Would a livestock guard dog (or donkey) help at all??? Those hogs are just SO big. And stinky.

Foxtrot's
Oct. 26, 2009, 01:35 AM
Kauai has feral pigs that are very damaging to the wild plants and they go on pig hunts there. We saw a dead one rotting on a fence line, ugh. Those and the wild cats that are killing the native birds.

BasqueMom
Oct. 26, 2009, 01:52 AM
OMG, had no idea they got that big! Haven't seen any around here, but in Denton, town of
80,000 plus to our south, they have become a problem in the suburban areas doing a number on lawns and pets. There are companies who specialize in rounding them up. Hopefully, they don't show up our way........

Bluey
Oct. 26, 2009, 02:28 AM
Bluey- can you shot them if you continue to see them because of the game preserve you're in?

Those pictures are darn scary- I'd imagine they have almost no predators.

Years ago I read an article about the growing feral pig problem, actually in TX. Farmers would shoot them out of the pickup truck but could barely get a handle on the problem. I think they are a big problem in eastern Colorado, too. Thankfully not here, at least, no yet ;)

Glad to hear your horses are ok. Would a livestock guard dog (or donkey) help at all??? Those hogs are just SO big. And stinky.

We are not a game preserve, there has not been any hunting here since 1957.
We are a wildlife preserve, where wildlife bred and raise their young unmolested, in our mile long canyons and then spread to the neighboring ranches and state lands, where they are hunted.

We can shoot any that will unbalance the native species and those feral hogs are an invasive species.
I don't think the hogs will become as numerous here, because we don't have the resources they would need for that, but I bet they will keep coming by, from here to there and while here, they will be a problem.
The game warden told us those hogs tend to be transient, maybe because they are so destructive, the scorched earth way they have of operating, so they have to move on.

We will just have to learn to live with them.
I am thinking that the reason they scared the horses so bad was because they were laying down asleep and the hogs came in out of nowhere and startled them.
I am not sure the horses mind the hogs that much, or they would not have been back to the pens the next morning.
They didn't last time a mountain lion ran them thru a gate, they didn't even want to go back to the pasture after that for several days, until they forgot.

A friend, that lives some 60 miles SE of here, shot one of those hogzillas last year right by his house and the picture made it into the TX hunting magazine.
What was scary is that he has a two year old boy that was playing around the house not long before that hog showed up.:eek:

thatmoody
Oct. 26, 2009, 08:18 AM
Hogs are something I know well - my ex husband and I used to make a living hunting and selling wild hogs. We had a pack of catahoula leopard hounds that was the envy of the state - we probably made more money selling puppies than selling the hogs after a while, and I wrote a column for the Catahoula magazine about training hog dogs :).

They smell bad because they eat garbage and meat, but if you catch them and feed them clean food (grain) for a while they will taste better. We used to catch and castrate the boars, and then feed them for a month - then they wouldn't smell so horrid. We hunted where you couldn't use guns, so the dogs would bay them (that's why we used the leopard dogs rather than pit bulls - they wouldn't catch the hogs, just get in their faces) and you'd run up behind the hogs while they were distracted and grab a hind leg and flip them. Then you'd sit on their head and tie their legs.

Florida is overrun with them, and we actually have one that comes into our pasture and eats with the horses. He probably escaped from someone's pen, and is lonely :). They're smart, and I used to like the ones we had. We also had some domestic hogs, and I would unfortunately get WAY to attached to them! One of our wild hogs used to get loose from the pen and go out and sleep underneath my mare. Every morning he'd break back INTO the hog pen and be there waiting for breakfast like nothing happened.

AnotherRound
Oct. 26, 2009, 09:48 AM
Mmmmmm.....BACON!:cool:

Renn/aissance
Oct. 26, 2009, 10:36 AM
Jeesh!! Those things are freakin' SCARY!!! They remind me of those things in the forest of evil or whatever it was on "The Princess Bride"! hee hee.. Those big rat things!!

You mean the Rodents of Unusual Size? I don't believe they exist. ;)


We can shoot any that will unbalance the native species and those feral hogs are an invasive species.
I don't think the hogs will become as numerous here, because we don't have the resources they would need for that, but I bet they will keep coming by, from here to there and while here, they will be a problem.

Perhaps I am misunderstanding, but doesn't their invasive, destructive nature give you justification to shoot them if they come 'round again?

I would not want to walk around the back barn and see one of those suckers staring me in the face, that's for sure.

JSwan
Oct. 26, 2009, 12:07 PM
Perhaps I am misunderstanding, but doesn't their invasive, destructive nature give you justification to shoot them if they come 'round again?



Invasive species are not protected under state or federal law and can be shot. The amount of damage feral hogs can cause, in just one day, is absolutely astounding.

I'd not want to piss one off, either. Hunting them is incredibly dangerous, whether on foot, with dogs/hounds or on horseback. Heck - even domestic pigs are dangerous.

There are stories about sounders in the Civil War - they followed the battles and feasted on the dead and dying after the battle was over. When wounded could not be evacuated, soldiers would put the wounded on top of piles of dead bodies - and give the wounded soldier a pistol to protect himself against the hogs.

Hogs don't wait until you're dead to eat you.

Oldenburg Mom
Oct. 26, 2009, 01:04 PM
VA has quite a few,...

Ohhhhh yeah. My hay guy was telling me every year they have a huge hog hunt...they are particularly destructive in the corn fields! Around here, though, they know why there are so many: hog farmer died and nobody knew for quite some time. Apparently all of them got "out" and it's been downhill from there.


An armored tank....maybe.

No kidding ... and great. Just another thing for me to worry about.

thatmoody
Oct. 26, 2009, 03:59 PM
Invasive species are not protected under state or federal law and can be shot. The amount of damage feral hogs can cause, in just one day, is absolutely astounding.

I'd not want to piss one off, either. Hunting them is incredibly dangerous, whether on foot, with dogs/hounds or on horseback. Heck - even domestic pigs are dangerous.

There are stories about sounders in the Civil War - they followed the battles and feasted on the dead and dying after the battle was over. When wounded could not be evacuated, soldiers would put the wounded on top of piles of dead bodies - and give the wounded soldier a pistol to protect himself against the hogs.

Hogs don't wait until you're dead to eat you.

Oh, and yes, hunting them IS dangerous - they are at least as smart as the dogs. A good pack of dogs will even the odds, but only just. There are a few things in Florida that eat them, including gators and panthers (there are more panthers in Florida than in just the Everglades, by the way - I saw one in Tosohatchee a couple of times). One of our cousins got his hand badly cut by a tush; the hog squirmed out from under his knee and cut his tendon so that he lost the use of his hand. But it paid well to hunt them. I was bitten once in the finger by a smaller hog - I still have a scar and a deformed finger. And my ex's husband got brucellosis from cleaning them. Plus it's a horribly violent way to make a living (I couldn't stomach it anymore, and was glad when I divorced him and didn't have to do that anymore).

Edit: Oh, but as for the best way to get RID of them, call a trapper who will come in and set up a trap. We used to do that in residential neighborhoods where we couldn't hunt with dogs.

CDE Driver
Oct. 26, 2009, 04:11 PM
My father's friend Justin Wilson send a pair of those puppies to our friends in SC to handle the feral hog population.

Is that the Justin Wilson that used to have that Southern cooking show on TV? I love that guy!

But seriously, I am SO glad we don't have those hogs here! I was thinking it was because we have serious winter, but my friend in TX told me that they have some Siberian hogs there that could live here, yikes! I guess they just haven't made it all the way out here.

Foxtrot's
Oct. 26, 2009, 04:11 PM
This is just as interesting as 2Jakes' thread!

In the first world war hogs were let loose in Europe for clean-up purposes, also.

BC has a gruesome, famous case where a pig farmer murdered dozens of prostitutes on his farm and then used his pigs to do the clean up. He is in jail now, thankfully, but at the time it was a horrifying story Tons and tons of soil was searched through for evidence and DNA and archaeological students had a job for months.

Then, to bring the matter really to our attention, the radio/tv asked anybody who had bought sausages from Willie Picton and still had any in their freezer to please turn the sausages in for analysis.

cloudyandcallie
Oct. 26, 2009, 04:19 PM
Is that the Justin Wilson that used to have that Southern cooking show on TV? I love that guy!

But seriously, I am SO glad we don't have those hogs here! I was thinking it was because we have serious winter, but my friend in TX told me that they have some Siberian hogs there that could live here, yikes! I guess they just haven't made it all the way out here.

Yes, my father is pictured in one of Justin's books. Justin lived in Denham springs (moved to Miss. when he divorced the last wife before he died a few years ago.) but he had catahoula leopard hounds and gave 2 to family friends who have wild hogs still over on their SC plantation. Dogs were too mean, even as puppies, and were given away. Hogs didn't bother the sheep or dogs or cats over there, just tore up gardens and all, and were hunted. The eagles killed a lot of lambs, though. No horses over there. The wild aka feral hogs in GA and SC are more of a menace to farm crops that to any farm animals. Both Cloudy and Callie ignored the ferals that would run across the trails in front of us. Hmmmmm, would siberian hogs be fuzzy and white?

harveyhorses
Oct. 26, 2009, 04:27 PM
Ohhhhh yeah. My hay guy was telling me every year they have a huge hog hunt...they are particularly destructive in the corn fields! Around here, though, they know why there are so many: hog farmer died and nobody knew for quite some time. Apparently all of them got "out" and it's been downhill from there.



No kidding ... and great. Just another thing for me to worry about.

Is there anything we DON't have in VA?? Great, just great, worrying is my second favorite sport;)

Foxtrot's
Oct. 26, 2009, 04:32 PM
Moody - you could tell some stories I'm sure - have you got any pictures? What a way to make a living.

If you sold the pig meat, what precautions did you take to prevent trichinosis?
(Or did you phone Chocomare for advice on a double dose of Equimax :D :D)

When I was a kid in Kenya our dog was yapping outside so my dad went out to call her in.
Suddenly he came storming inside and slammed the door, gasping "Bloody pig chased me", which is what the dog was barking at.

I have a pig tusk as a bottle opener and we frequently bring it out as a topic of conversation. Few people know what it is.

JSwan
Oct. 26, 2009, 04:41 PM
Is there anything we DON't have in VA?? Great, just great, worrying is my second favorite sport;)

We have Elk too - and soon we'll have a lot more of them.

thatmoody
Oct. 26, 2009, 05:05 PM
I do have some pictures but they're all hardcopy - I need to haul out the scanner for some horse pictures so maybe I'll do some hog ones as well :).

Bluey
Oct. 26, 2009, 07:09 PM
Yes, my father is pictured in one of Justin's books. Justin lived in Denham springs (moved to Miss. when he divorced the last wife before he died a few years ago.) but he had catahoula leopard hounds and gave 2 to family friends who have wild hogs still over on their SC plantation. Dogs were too mean, even as puppies, and were given away. Hogs didn't bother the sheep or dogs or cats over there, just tore up gardens and all, and were hunted. The eagles killed a lot of lambs, though. No horses over there. The wild aka feral hogs in GA and SC are more of a menace to farm crops that to any farm animals. Both Cloudy and Callie ignored the ferals that would run across the trails in front of us. Hmmmmm, would siberian hogs be fuzzy and white?

Our feral hogs come in all colors, just not purple and neon green and orange polka dots yet.:)

All we have seen around here are hairy and bristly, very smelly and from a dirty white all over, gray and brown patchy, solid tan to brown to black and blueish roan.
Most seem to be a dirty brown or gray.

Yes, we will shoot them or at them, as the game warden said to keep making life around here hard for them and that will keep them moving on.

Oldenburg Mom
Oct. 26, 2009, 07:38 PM
Gruesome stories here.

Of course, if the topic was GROUND ... HOGS, I would be cheering for each and every hunter, gator and panther. :lol: Lord have mercy, I really hate groundhogs!

JSwan
Oct. 27, 2009, 08:25 AM
All we have seen around here are hairy and bristly, very smelly and from a dirty white all over, gray and brown patchy, solid tan to brown to black and blueish roan.
Most seem to be a dirty brown or gray.


Bluey -Do you think that at some point these sounders are more of a landrace than a true feral? Unless something has changed recently, my understanding is that these ferals are moving north - so our northern neighbors may have to deal with these hogs at some point.

Louise
Oct. 27, 2009, 08:47 AM
I think that they have already made it north, JSwan. I got curious, and it took all of about 30 seconds to find this article from a paper in New York State.

http://www.oleantimesherald.com/articles/2009/10/26/news/doc4ae607e23fffe626880531.txt

Monday, October 26, 2009 6:16 PM EDT
Wild pigs spotted in Allegany State Park
By Olean Times Herald

RED HOUSE - Allegany State Park officials became aware of feral pigs wandering in the state park on Friday.

A state park road crew employee spotted a trio of what appeared to be wild pigs and snapped a grainy photo of them along ASP Route 2 near France Brook Road in the interior of the park.
“It was the first time we’ve confirmed the presence of feral pigs in the park,” Brad Whitcomb, manager of the park, said this morning. He was not aware a park visitor had taken a photo of three feral swine the day before.

“Where they came from, how long we’ve had them here, or are they just passing through the area, who really knows?” Mr. Whitcomb said.

JSwan
Oct. 27, 2009, 08:52 AM
Oh my.

I hope your state can eliminate those suckers before they get too numerous.

Bluey
Oct. 27, 2009, 10:24 AM
This is what we have here:

http://www.texashuntfish.com/app/view/GalleryItem/8461/POPULATION-DECREASE;jsessionid=6AF10A8D8DDB36F4132776C9132BD5 88

As you can see in that picture, that fellow had trouble with the smell, the way he was wrinking his nose.

I think there are so many any more that the horses will get used to them coming and going.

mlranchtx
Oct. 27, 2009, 10:40 AM
Yes, the hogs and the fire ants are spreading north...

Muwahahahahaha.....

Soon you too can experience these delightful creatures :eek:

Arizona DQ
Oct. 27, 2009, 04:48 PM
Good Lordy that must have been a surprise for your daughter! I would be able to run light speed if I saw one of those German Hogzillas! :lol:
I did hear they're not seen very often unless hunters are actively looking for them using tracking dogs. I think that's probably a good thing, LOL!


They taste so good!!! Yummy!!:winkgrin:

MistyBlue
Oct. 27, 2009, 05:20 PM
Harveyhorses...actually either fortunately or unfortunately (depending on POV) VA has an almost ideal climate for lots and lots of new species to thrive. Your winters are on the mild side and your warmer weather growing seasons are a good length of time. You have all sorts of different habitats and enough open areas without humans in close proximity.
You guys have some pretty decent sized hogs. Elk will thrive there too, despite them handling frigid weather wonderfully they also do well in more temperate climates too.

Louise, you guys have had feral hogs for some time now. In northern climates they don't thrive as well as they do in warmer ones, but they don't die off either. They have more of a planned mating season and less offspring when they have them. Of course they still have more than enough to survive to adulthood, but they don't normally have huge litters like they can in hot climates. They also don't always grow quite as large as they can in places like TX on average, but there can be a few quite big ones. We've had a few here in CT here and there, but mostly the ones caught have been second or third generation ferals from local domestics. We don't get a whole lot of the bastardized European feral stock up here. Those are the huge growing very crazy looking types. Those are the better type for surviving very cold climates, but have been here in warm climates in the USA for so long now that the descendents aren't yet capable to thriving back in frigid temps again. They originally came from Germany and Russia so were made for cold climates, but thousands of generations now in warm climates have changed them a tad.
It's just in places like NY they aren't seen as often, but they've been there a while. Give it some more time and as long as you have enough opn space for them to breed undisturbed and they'll start multiplying and adapting fast.
NY does not have a season for them...if hunters see them they should shoot them. They're extremely destructive.

RainyDayRide
Oct. 27, 2009, 06:10 PM
They're a problem in the south SF Bay area too.. think hilly parks with lots of acorn dropping oak trees. They do quite a bit of damage rooting around. (I wonder if the resident cougars eat some of the young ones.)

There are also some closer to the coast, enjoying fields of brussel sprouts, artichokes, etc. More than one motorcyclist has had a too-close encounter with one of the beasts crossing a dark highway to get to more choice morsels.

FalseImpression
Oct. 27, 2009, 06:23 PM
They do stink to high heaven, especially if there were boars in the group.

My husband works for a German company and they have quite a few folks there who hunt boars for sport overseas. With dogs, from horseback. At one of the company dinner parties when they were over we got to talking horses (naturally, they love their horses and dogs!) and I was invited to come over and try boar hunting with them. I mentioned it wasn't common to find a horse that didn't freak out over boar smell, and one told me, "It takes a brave rider and even braver horse!" :lol: The men in the group who hunted board almost all had Gelderlanders, which gave me the giggles a bit because Gal was about 1/3 Gelderlander and was about as spooky as a horse can be over stuff like wildlife and woods. :winkgrin:

The funniest thing I ever saw happened about 16 years ago on one of my visits to France with the kids. We went to an event that gathered dogs and horses and there was a demonstration of a hunt. There, in the middle of the pack of dogs, was a baby wild boar. He was running WITH the dogs since he had been raised with them. To entice the dogs, the riders were dragging a wild board scented bag. We could not understand how the dogs would not turn on their little friend, but I guess he smelled more like one of the dogs than a boar?

It was really funny and very very cute!

Wild boar is often on the menu in Europe, but they are also in a lot of petting zoos.

MistyBlue
Oct. 27, 2009, 07:47 PM
LOL, that must have been cute FalseImpression! :D

RainyDayRide...the normal predators for the large hogs would be cougars, bears and some wolf packs. Other than those...nnot much else is going to tangle with a grown sow or boar. And if a boar hits massive sized, I'd rule out wolves and cougars and pretty much just leave very large bears. :eek:
They can rip up the ground, huh?
Actually with my bumper crop from the nut trees this year, I probably wouldn't mind renting a few domestic swine to gobble them up. These mower blades are going to have to be tossed in the garbage after this fall's clean ups. :no:

Foxtrot's
Oct. 27, 2009, 08:20 PM
The dogs and pig story remnds me of the Yotube vid of the piggy who rounded up the racher's cattle. Remember that? I can't post it but it is under "Pig rounds up cattle".

llsc
Oct. 27, 2009, 09:28 PM
There are stories about sounders in the Civil War - they followed the battles and feasted on the dead and dying after the battle was over. When wounded could not be evacuated, soldiers would put the wounded on top of piles of dead bodies - and give the wounded soldier a pistol to protect himself against the hogs.

Hogs don't wait until you're dead to eat you.

My grandfather was in WWII and said the domestic pigs in France were eating all the dead soldiers around him.

fivehorses
Oct. 27, 2009, 09:42 PM
I find some of the topics on this site absolutely fascinating. I have learned about giant snakes and now wild boars.
the photos of the ones in NY look fine to deal with. Misty Blue, those photos are like looking at some prehistoric monster. I can not believe how huge those pigs were. I'd be dead of a heart attack from seeing one of those running in the woods. I think I would prefer to meet a great white honestly.

AppJumpr08
Oct. 27, 2009, 09:52 PM
The dogs and pig story remnds me of the Yotube vid of the piggy who rounded up the racher's cattle. Remember that? I can't post it but it is under "Pig rounds up cattle".

Meet "Squeeky (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4eZeTOyDT0)! :D

I've already watched it twice.

Foxtrot's
Oct. 27, 2009, 10:42 PM
I was hoping somebody would come to my rescue -- some things I never learned to do (yet).

MistyBlue
Oct. 27, 2009, 11:07 PM
Love that herding pig!

fivehorses...the good news is that the monster sized hogs aren't the majority of them. Takes ideal living conditions for them to get that large.

But yeah, I agree with you on the heart attack thing. I've rehabbed and handled some pretty creepy or large or nasty tempered animals...I'd not be a happy camper to have a huge tusker show up here. High powered rifle be darned, I'd want a grenade launcher LOL!

But I'd still rather see a huge tusker than a great white. Sharks...*shudder*....big swimming things with teeth I do NOT deal with. :eek: