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Meredith Clark
Oct. 22, 2009, 08:43 PM
Has anyone tried this (http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.html?pgguid=2680e010-35c1-4395-88cf-d0db989bd149) ?

A bit pricey, but a good idea! Am I just being lazy by not wanting to drain the hose all winter ?? :lol:

sublimequine
Oct. 22, 2009, 08:46 PM
What a neat invention! :eek: :yes:

Meredith Clark
Oct. 22, 2009, 08:48 PM
What a neat invention! :eek: :yes:

Right?? I love that you can leave it turned on too (I hate using or having other people use bucket heaters b/c i'm afraid they'll be left on and start a fire)

180 watts isn't too much energy either

LauraKY
Oct. 22, 2009, 08:50 PM
I want it! I can't afford it, but I want it!

N&B&T
Oct. 22, 2009, 10:51 PM
There's a good idea!

Fairview Horse Center
Oct. 22, 2009, 11:14 PM
OK, but what about the faucet/hydrant that you leave it connected to? :no:

Build a hose box to go around a regular hose reel & hydrant. Insulate it, and put a 100 watt bulb in it. Cut little hinged doors to be able to run the hose out thru, and wind it up. Then you can use your cheaper hose, and any length you need.

allpurpose
Oct. 23, 2009, 12:18 AM
OK, but what about the faucet/hydrant that you leave it connected to? :no:

Build a hose box to go around a regular hose reel & hydrant. Insulate it, and put a 100 watt bulb in it. Cut little hinged doors to be able to run the hose out thru, and wind it up. Then you can use your cheaper hose, and any length you need.

I was just about to suggest this! Maybe $25-worth of supplies, an hour or so worth of effort, and voila! Heated hose!

msj
Oct. 24, 2009, 11:01 PM
Yep, I agree it's a neat idea but I'd hate to see the electric bill at the end of a hard winter. :eek:

As for worrying about the hydrant, they make a heating tape that goes around it to keep if from freezing. I use that when the temps get below 20 degrees.

What is so hard about buying a hose reel with wheels and wheeling hose reel into nice warm heated tack room when you are done using it? I do it twice/day in the winter for just 2 horses because I don't like carrying buckets anymore than necessary. The last hose reel I bought is warranted for 7 yrs which I'd consider a decent amount of time. If you buy at the right time you can get a hose reel on sale too. :D

Equibrit
Oct. 24, 2009, 11:06 PM
Electricity and water are a dangerous combination.

Fairview Horse Center
Oct. 24, 2009, 11:36 PM
Electricity and water are a dangerous combination.

I agree, but in the case of heat tapes, you don't need water in the mix to be dangerous.

I worked at a barn that used them, and every couple of months, we would begin to smell smoke, start the frantic searching, and sure enough, the heat tape was melting. With a hydrant or pipes, the tape loops often shift a bit, and if they begin to touch, they can cause a fire. :eek:

We use a self draining hydrant that as long as you disconnect the hose, it drains.

As for heated buckets, they cause barn fires every year. No thanks. I will break ice out of them, and not worry (or pay a huge electric bill). Heating elements in bucket and trough heaters pull a lot of current, and barns are not usually designed to handle that current.

Meredith Clark
Oct. 24, 2009, 11:42 PM
What is so hard about buying a hose reel with wheels and wheeling hose reel into nice warm heated tack room when you are done using it? e you can get a

You assume we all have a nice warm heated tack room :lol:

Although I can't complain.. I should have mine within 3-4 weeks depending on how long the Amish take :D

Altag
Oct. 24, 2009, 11:42 PM
As for worrying about the hydrant, they make a heating tape that goes around it to keep if from freezing. I use that when the temps get below 20 degrees.

What is so hard about buying a hose reel with wheels and wheeling hose reel into nice warm heated tack room when you are done using it?

Well, if you don't have a nice, warm, heated tack room (or heat in the barn at all for that matter!), you have to drain the hose. :(

Can you provide some more details about the heating tape stuff? How does it work? Does it stay on the hose all the time? Where can you get it?

I'm thinkin', gift for the barn owner -- a heated hose or maybe the heating tape stuff??? :eek::cool:

Current winter routine is to hook up the hose, fill the bucket (heated bucket, thankdog), then unhook the hose, drain it, and leave it on the slope of the hill until the next person needs it. :rolleyes: It's a bit of a pain and a time-waster. :dead:

dmalbone
Oct. 25, 2009, 12:55 PM
What is so hard about buying a hose reel with wheels and wheeling hose reel into nice warm heated tack room when you are done using it?

BWAHAHAHAHA!


...can you guess I don't have heated tack room and never will?

msj
Oct. 25, 2009, 02:08 PM
:( :( Well, I'm sorry for those of you that don't have heated tack rooms but I boarded at only one barn here in western NY that didn't have one and I'd NEVER EVER do it again. Fortunately the horse I had at the time went OK in a rubber bit that didn't need a ton of warming up. But never again would I leave valuable tack in an unheated room. :no:

As for the heat tape that goes around the hyrdrant, you can find it at any hardware store. Obviously you will need an electrical outlet near by. Even though I've got a frost free hydrant it did freeze up on me one winter -totally my fault too. Unfortunately it froze the 2nd time that winter and I don't really enjoy standing out there with either my blow dryer or a small heating unit waiting for it to thaw so I bought the heat tape. I've used it for probably 4-6 winters so far with no problems.

I simply can't imagine draining a hose every day. :no: You do have my sympathy. :yes:

Fairview Horse Center
Oct. 25, 2009, 02:27 PM
But never again would I leave valuable tack in an unheated room.

:confused: Why? :confused:

My saddle has lived in a an unheated tack room all of its life, and this year it is 31 years young. Ok, I do clean every 4 or 5 years, and oil it every decade or so, have had to replace the billets once, but I think it may go another 25 years or so. :yes:

I just stretch out the hose and blow it out.

kellidahorsegirl
Oct. 25, 2009, 02:36 PM
That hose looks genius! Most our troughs are directly under a hydrant, so that works fine, but a couple horses are in a smaller pen and need a hose to fill their trough...and of course its small, so it needs to be filled every few days. I have to drain hoses......I don't have a heated tack room and the house is too far away to store hoses in the basement. I sorta might plan for 'warmer' days to string the hose out and 'melt' and fill THAT day.....cuz out here, even when you drain a hose (I walk back and forth under it 3 times to drain)...it will STILL innevitably freeze :(

Last winter it got so cold that all my hoses were frozen and I filled buckets under the hydrant and carried those to the small trough and dumped buckets.......takes a LOT of trips to do that too..............sigh HAHA oh yeah and my gloves kept freezing to the bucket handle HAHA

magicteetango
Oct. 25, 2009, 02:39 PM
Darlyn, blow it out?

Fairview Horse Center
Oct. 25, 2009, 03:50 PM
Yes, I just leave the end outside the door when I finish watering, disconnect the hose from the hydrant, and blow in that end (like you are blowing up a balloon). The water drains thru the open end outside the door. It takes about 30 seconds (3 or 4 breaths) until you can feel (and hear)it be clear (no pressure while you are blowing). I leave it stretched out along the aisle edge, or coil horizontally on the washrack, as if you roll it up vertically (loops or on a winder), the few drips will run the the bottom of a loop and freeze. Those leftover drops can freeze stretched out, and it will still let water flow thru.

Meredith Clark
Oct. 26, 2009, 12:16 AM
Yep, I agree it's a neat idea but I'd hate to see the electric bill at the end of a hard winter. :eek:



I see you're from NY so your winters are prolly much worse than mine (Maryland) but I was thinking of just plugging it in before I needed it.

ex: get to the barn and plug it in, organize horses, feed and then when it's warm do water and then unplug it.

msj
Oct. 26, 2009, 10:45 AM
I see you're from NY so your winters are prolly much worse than mine (Maryland) but I was thinking of just plugging it in before I needed it.

ex: get to the barn and plug it in, organize horses, feed and then when it's warm do water and then unplug it.

Having spent ~ 5 yrs in Potomac, MD, and 37 yrs in NY, yes, our winters are much more severe and cold and snowy and long,etc. etc., etc. :lol: :lol:

DiablosHalo
Oct. 26, 2009, 12:13 PM
It does sound like a neat idea- but 25/50' is no where near long enough! ;)

I just had auto heated waterers installed in the fields outside. Before that (for 7 long winters...) I had 900+' of hose laid out from spigot to troughs. Every day- I'd have to drain all those hoses. After the second winter- I had it down to a science and it only took 5 minutes to drain them all. I had enough hose laid out- I didn't have to drag hoses anywhere- they just laid down the fence lines to each field. I'd unhook the hose and just start walking to the other end- draining it as I went.

We have frost free spigots at each field also and in the barn- so I just unhook and drain the barn hose now. That one is only 150' and takes under one minute to drain.

I do have a heated feed room but it's too much of a pain to roll up/carry hose in/out of feedroom - it's actually easier for me to drain the hose!

LauraKY
Oct. 27, 2009, 02:30 PM
I want one! Maybe my Christmas present.

Trevelyan96
Oct. 27, 2009, 04:05 PM
My winter watering routine:

Wheel the hose reel to the hydrant.
Fill buckets.
Turn off hydrant, open hose nozzle.
Spin the hose on the reel (nice biceps workout! :D)
Drain what's remaining.
Put the hose reel away.

I think its a neat invention, but I'm paranoid about electricity and barns. I do have heated water buckets, but we have a main switch to turn them on and off with so they're not running all of the time. Saves on the electric bill too.

msj
Oct. 27, 2009, 04:54 PM
My winter watering routine:

Wheel the hose reel to the hydrant.
Fill buckets.
Turn off hydrant, open hose nozzle.
Spin the hose on the reel (nice biceps workout! :D)
Drain what's remaining.
Put the hose reel away.

I think its a neat invention, but I'm paranoid about electricity and barns. I do have heated water buckets, but we have a main switch to turn them on and off with so they're not running all of the time. Saves on the electric bill too.


I'm lost without my hose reel! :D Especially considering I have a 100' aisle and at the end farthest from the hydrant is where I have tubs to soak hay for a horse with RAO (heaves). I'd sure hate to have to hand roll the hose. And heaven forbid when I go to water the indoor that I'd have to hand roll! :eek: I just had to buy a new one in February and checked to see how long it was guaranteed - 7 yrs and I hope it lasts longer. :) I don't use the heated buckets. When I built the barn 20 yrs ago, I don't think they existed. I've got the insulated buckets which I empty twice/day both summer and winter. They weren't cheap but they seem to last forever. :)

amdfarm
Oct. 28, 2009, 07:18 AM
Oh how'd I'd love to have that hose, but as another poster mentioned, one section wouldn't cut it. I'd need 150-200' of it to reach and it would be connected to the house spigot since I don't have hydrants. *sigh* $$$

We do drain it, as I'm on a decent hill, but sometimes it doesn't always work.

That hose would make winter life so much easier!! I will continue to dream!

Liberty
Oct. 28, 2009, 08:29 AM
Oh how'd I'd love to have that hose, but as another poster mentioned, one section wouldn't cut it. I'd need 150-200' of it to reach and it would be connected to the house spigot since I don't have hydrants. *sigh* $$$

We do drain it, as I'm on a decent hill, but sometimes it doesn't always work.

That hose would make winter life so much easier!! I will continue to dream!

Same situation here. I just leave my hose stretched out from the house to the barn all year long. A nuisance to drain it all winter though, so yeah, a heated hose would be super, but not in my budget.

My house spigot is supposed to be self draining as long as the hose is disconnected, but it's on the north side of the house so when we get windy super-cold temps, it's frozen up on me. However, hubby discovered an easy way to help keep that from happening - take a can of that compressed air that's made to clean computer keyboards, etc. and spritz it up into the spigot to blow out any water droplets. Works pretty darn good.

I also use one of those cheapy styrofoam spigot covers; don't know if it helps, but I figured it couldn't hurt.

As for heated buckets, I use those muck bucket-sized ones where the heating elements are built inside the tub walls rather than being exposed. Been using the same ones for 10 years w/absolutely no problems. Easy to clean too without. Well worth the $60 I paid for each of them. :yes:

amdfarm
Oct. 28, 2009, 08:44 AM
I don't have a barn, so it's three stock tanks in the pastures. Hose is left out all year round here also, unless it freezes and I have to unhook miles of it and drag it into the basement to unthaw. Such a PITA!! I'm already dreading putting in tank heaters, let alone dealing w/ frozen hoses.

My spigot is on the west side of the house w/ no real protection, but thankfully it's never froze. We have dogs outside that need watering, too.

Definitely going to show the BF that hose though. I know he'd love it on chore days, too. Maybe for Christmas!! :D

lesbrill54
Oct. 29, 2009, 04:04 PM
I feel like James Herriot(that man can really wrap a cat), but I have to confess that after 30+ years in the business, I can really drain a hose. I stretch it out, disconnect it, pick up the faucet end and meditatively walk down the length, raising it as I go. I have two over 100 ft, but confess i do have some slope to help. In the rare occasions when were not success, an hour in the sun even when quite cold usually gets it going. Also, if youre not sure whether its frozen, blow in one end- if you can its ok, and let me tell you , i'm not looking forward to winter.

amdfarm
Dec. 4, 2009, 01:14 AM
Bumping this back up, it's getting to be time for frozen hoses and draining for some of us again. We already have highs below freezing and I was greeted w/ a frozen hose at chore time this afternoon.

I finally told the BF about it and am hope hope hoping it can be an early Christmas present. I also found out that it's less than 100 ft to the top of the hill where the tanks are, so a good deal less money than originally thought. About $210 for two hoses.

dmalbone
Dec. 4, 2009, 02:08 AM
I also found out that it's less than 100 ft to the top of the hill where the tanks are, so a good deal less money than originally thought. About $210 for two hoses.

But you can't connect two hoses right? That's my problem right now.

Robin@DHH
Dec. 4, 2009, 12:48 PM
If you have to disconnect hoses regularly for winter
watering, look at the Gatorlock Garden Hose Couplers.
These make connecting and disconnecting to the frost
hydrant easier. Mine are on their third winter and
we are near Minneapolis so we do get quite cold weather.

Romany
Dec. 6, 2009, 02:57 PM
I feel like James Herriot(that man can really wrap a cat), but I have to confess that after 30+ years in the business, I can really drain a hose. I stretch it out, disconnect it, pick up the faucet end and meditatively walk down the length, raising it as I go. I have two over 100 ft, but confess i do have some slope to help. In the rare occasions when were not success, an hour in the sun even when quite cold usually gets it going. Also, if youre not sure whether its frozen, blow in one end- if you can its ok, and let me tell you , i'm not looking forward to winter.


That was me for the last couple of winters - this year I saw the light; stick a pallet on the tractor, load it up with buckets of water (I've been saving big lidded buckets all year), drive out to the trough every time it gets low, and fill it. :yes:

I HATED :mad: hauling 200' of frozen hose from barn to house to thaw it enough that it would uncurl enough to reach the paddock. It was empty, but frozen stiff. :dead:

Romany
Dec. 6, 2009, 02:59 PM
If you have to disconnect hoses regularly for winter
watering, look at the Gatorlock Garden Hose Couplers.
These make connecting and disconnecting to the frost
hydrant easier. Mine are on their third winter and
we are near Minneapolis so we do get quite cold weather.


Those Gatorlock couplers are just plastic, though: don't you find they crack or shatter in the deep cold?

I use the metal couplers, but they always seem to leak a bit, dunno why.

dmalbone
Dec. 6, 2009, 04:10 PM
So this is probably a stupid question, but... since the actual electrical cord part only runs down the hose 6' (I thought it went the whole length, but it doesn't) is it not strong enough to heat any additional hose you add to it? For instance... to get the hose to my barn I'd have to go 20' through my garage, which I could most likely use a regular hose for, attach a 50' heated hose, then attach another 50' regular hose and it would be a lot better than walking the entire way. I'd still have to walk some, but not all the way up hill with buckets. Is the heater not strong enough to keep the rest unfrozen? There has to be something! We're just not going to get water run out there before winter unfortunately. :no:

skyy
Dec. 6, 2009, 04:34 PM
For those of you stuck lugging buckets of water to a trough in the winter, try using gas cans (new and clean obviously). Our outer paddocks have no electricity so the troughs have to be dumped and refilled daily to avoid becoming useless ice cubes. We fill up 4 five gallon gas cans and wheelbarrow them to the paddock trough. This seems to be enough water to get 2-3 horses through daylight turnout and you don't get soaked lugging them around.

dmalbone
Dec. 6, 2009, 04:41 PM
For those of you stuck lugging buckets of water to a trough in the winter, try using gas cans (new and clean obviously). Our outer paddocks have no electricity so the troughs have to be dumped and refilled daily to avoid becoming useless ice cubes. We fill up 4 five gallon gas cans and wheelbarrow them to the paddock trough. This seems to be enough water to get 2-3 horses through daylight turnout and you don't get soaked lugging them around. What do you do when there's 2'-3' of snow? I do use gas cans, but it's still a giant PITA. We do have heated "muck bucket" troughs we'll use, but getting the water there is still annoying. :)

Oh yeah, I should say that the ground drops off of the driveway so you have to walk up and down a little hill every time you go to the barn. I'm just dreading it.

foggybok
Dec. 6, 2009, 05:27 PM
It does sound like a neat idea- but 25/50' is no where near long enough! ;)

I just had auto heated waterers installed in the fields outside. Before that (for 7 long winters...) I had 900+' of hose laid out from spigot to troughs. Every day- I'd have to drain all those hoses. After the second winter- I had it down to a science and it only took 5 minutes to drain them all. I had enough hose laid out- I didn't have to drag hoses anywhere- they just laid down the fence lines to each field. I'd unhook the hose and just start walking to the other end- draining it as I went.

We have frost free spigots at each field also and in the barn- so I just unhook and drain the barn hose now. That one is only 150' and takes under one minute to drain.

I do have a heated feed room but it's too much of a pain to roll up/carry hose in/out of feedroom - it's actually easier for me to drain the hose!

I'm with you, I don't have 900 feet, but I do have hundreds....

Gravity is your friend, in the early winter I loop the hose over the clothesline uprights near the house, and leave the far end on the hill , then disconnect at the hydrant, water automatically drains out..... But I don't need that now, as I can only use the tank next to the house (since I need the heater now), so I just keep the short hose in the mudroom......

amdfarm
Dec. 22, 2009, 06:01 AM
But you can't connect two hoses right? That's my problem right now.

BF's calculations were wrong, I need 175' of hose to make it to the tanks from the spigot. :mad:

I would certainly think you'd be able to connect them together, but I'm not positive. Not everyone just has 50'/25', many are much further. I might email and ask and see if they know if that would work or not.

My poor hoses have been springing new leaks like crazy this winter so far. Dad has offered to buy me all new hoses next week, but I REALLY want the heated ones. I don't think he'll spring that much for hoses though. :(

AKB
Dec. 22, 2009, 02:24 PM
I got my heated hose a month ago and love it. This am, I plugged it in because temps were below freezing and I hadn't drained the hose after last using it. A few minutes later, I turned on the water. Water flowed through the hose. I was so excited. If it hadn't worked, I would have had to dig the hose out of the snow, carry it to the house, thaw it (leaving a mess on the floor), and then drag it back outside. Winter is not fun!

Iron Horse Farm
Dec. 22, 2009, 02:55 PM
Yes, I just leave the end outside the door when I finish watering, disconnect the hose from the hydrant, and blow in that end (like you are blowing up a balloon). The water drains thru the open end outside the door. It takes about 30 seconds (3 or 4 breaths) until you can feel (and hear)it be clear (no pressure while you are blowing). I leave it stretched out along the aisle edge, or coil horizontally on the washrack, as if you roll it up vertically (loops or on a winder), the few drips will run the the bottom of a loop and freeze. Those leftover drops can freeze stretched out, and it will still let water flow thru.

We have 150-200 feet of the large diameter hose, so I couldn't begin to blow it out, but we do have an air compressor in the tack room. Hook to hose, turn on, wait 30-45seconds and voila! hose is almost dry on the inside.

We also have heat tape on our Frost-free hydrant since it has frozen more than once. The newer (read more expensive) heat tapes have thermometers in them and automatically shut off if they get too hot - they also don't stay on all the time......they run for a bit, shut off and come back on.

TBMaggie
Dec. 22, 2009, 08:41 PM
I don't have a heated barn either. In my pump room, I have a small heater (bought at Walmart for $10) connected to a thermostat. Heater is set at 40 degrees, and only cycles on when the temp in the pump room dips. I leave the hose reel in there, and have never had a problem with the actual pump freezing or the hose.

My pump room is maybe 10 x 10, and is insulated. My barn is also wired with fire detectors. An alarm would sound in my house.