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Tallyyo
Oct. 21, 2009, 08:48 PM
Just wondering about other peoples' thoughts and experiences pulling larger trailers with trucks that are not dual tire. I have always pulled my four horse with living quarters with a dually (Ford F350 Super Duty), but my boyfriend wants to trade it in for a standard F350 (with only four tires!)! I don't feel comfortable with this type of tow vehicle. I have had several tire blow outs with the dually and barely felt it. How will a regular truck handle a blow out, or a sudden manuver to avoid an idiot who slams the breaks on right in front of you, or other emergency situation? I was told the tow vehicle should be as wide, if not wider than the trailer. Is this true? I would appreciate any feed back!

Joyrider
Oct. 21, 2009, 10:24 PM
When I got my first gooseneck (just a two horse with large tack area) I used a "straight job" truck - F350 Crew cab. It was a tough combo. The truck "walked" all over the road and I always had to steer it every second. Of course I didn't know any better until I got a new truck - F350 dually Crew cab. WOW. The thing drove itself. I could actually arrive at a show without my nerves being frayed from driving. It was like night and day I tell ya. Once you go dually, you'll never want to go back. So solid, so safe feeling.

I have since sold my rig and now that I don't ship much anymore I personally would be fine with a straight job and a little bumper pull for short trips but to go on the road regularly again, I would do the dually/gooseneck for sure.

Christa P
Oct. 21, 2009, 11:18 PM
We pull a 20' gooseneck with an extended cab, long bed, 4x4, standard 4-wheel F350. Steering is no problem and we don't even notice the trailer.

BTW, this truck did have some steering problems when my mom bought it used, but replaceing a steering arm a few other repairs fixed it so the steering is fine.


Christa

cssutton
Oct. 21, 2009, 11:30 PM
I don't agree at all.

I have a 2008 F350. It is the third F350 in a row. My last one was a '99 with 357,000 miles on it when I traded for the 2008.

Both single rear wheels.

If you rode with me in either of them with your eyes closed, you would not know the trailer was there. My trailer is a 4 horse Sundowner, slant load.

There are a couple of secrets.

First, get the trailer package. Also get the camper package because it includes anti sway bars and a few other things.

Next, be sure the tires are rated for the load and run the rears at 80 PSI.

I will not use anything but Michelin.

If you read Ford's own info, you will see that single rear wheel is rated to pull more than duallys because everything you add to the truck adds gross weight. Since the F350 is limited, anything added to the truck should be deducted from trailer weight.

As for safety, yes if one rear blows the other is there but you don't have duallys on the front do you? That is the dangerous tire to blow, not the rear.

Besides, I have not seen a tubless blow in years and years. In the old days, they used to drum into your head how to control a front tire blowout. Not any more because tubeless just slowly collapse unless you purchase a cheap tire and run it under the required pressure.

By the way, get a digital tire gauge. The old style is just not good enough for today's tire loads and high speeds.

If the tire is quality, properly inflated and the hitch weight is not unreasonable, duallys are a waste.

Now if you have a $150,000 trailer with living quarters, the hitch weight will not only require duallys, but probably a F450 or F550.

I run everything from the interstate at 70 MPH to one regular trip over a mountain that has curves that limits the speed to 25 MPH with a 9% grade and there is no difference in truck performance with or without the trailer.

If you don't know what a 9% grade is: That is where the big trucks go down the mountain in the low gears, brakes smoking, high speed truck emergency run-outs on the side of the road, etc.

Duallys are really intended for high rear axle loads. For instance, a wrecker.

Someone hauling a lot of bricks, cinderblocks or with one of those walk in plumbing equipment bodies stored with lots of pipe fittings, tools, etc.

Duallys don't park well in the shopping center and you can't rotate the tires.

My last set of Michelens, for 20" wheels, cost $1,500 mounted and balanced.

For a dually, the price would have been $2,250. That $2,250 won't carry me one inch further than the $1,500 will.

My opinion. But I figure I have pulled that trailer more than 230,000 miles with F350 4 wheels.

So I do have some experience.

If you get a diesel, be sure you get 4 wheel drive. The diesel is so heavy on the front wheels that even dew on the grass will cause the rear wheels to slip. You could not give me a diesel 2 wheel drive.

Oh yes. All of my experience is with F350's. Now if you are going to buy some off brand, I can't help you.

CSSJR

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Guilherme
Oct. 21, 2009, 11:34 PM
If your primary purpose is towing the the DRW will add stability and peace of mind. If your primary purpose is moving about town the DRW will mean difficuties in tight places.

So what do YOU (not your boyfriend, not your neighbors, not me, not any COTHer, etc) want? If you are paying the bill then buy what you want; if not then you get to compromise.

G.

Grataan
Oct. 21, 2009, 11:57 PM
Much more stability with the dually. You could not pay me enough to haul anything over 4 horses (and that is just 4-not 4+lq) without a DRW truck. I'll make two trips.

The above poster is incorrect, you can certainly rotate the tires. And I buy only Toyo M55 offroad/mud/snow tires. And I have them siped. I will not compromise safety

cssutton
Oct. 22, 2009, 12:37 AM
Never had a dually, so I was wrong on rotating tires.

However, I stand by everything else I posted. That is my real world on the road experience.

Duallys are a total waste unless you are pulling something that requires a high rear axle load and a properly loaded 4 horse trailer does not have a high hitch load.

CSSJR

Go Fish
Oct. 22, 2009, 01:28 AM
Quite frankly, looking at where you live, I'd go with a dually.

lauriep
Oct. 22, 2009, 07:17 AM
Duallys add a great deal of stability. I would recommend one with anything over a 2 horse. Not absolutely necessary, and, like cssutton, many people do fine with 4 wheels. But I can feel the difference and that is enough for me.

Tallyyo
Oct. 22, 2009, 08:00 AM
Thanks for the info! My dually is a diesel 350 and 4 WD (no other way to go!) We normally drive over two hours to a show (many times more like 6-7) so we are on the road alot! Last weekend on the way back from KY Horse Park someone decided to stop in the middle of the slow lane then move quickly to the breakdown lane. Both lanes stopped suddenly, and we couldn't move to the right shoulder...I feel that if we didn't have the dually we would not have been able steer safely out of that situation. Also, the engineer from Ford that I spoke to said that the wider base will keep us safer in those situations (I think he was right). Also, he told me the 450 is the same truck, just the transmission being slightly different. (I'm not a mechanic, but I've driven a 550 with my trailer and it was a bit "faster" off the line, but otherwise drove the same). Just trying to start some discussion, I don't want to start any arguements about trucks! ;)

cherham
Oct. 22, 2009, 08:22 AM
I own a three horse with full living quarters 8 feet wide. We live in Ontario, Canada and experience a LOT of snow in the winter and mud! in the spring and summer. There is no way I would pull my trailer with a dually. I would almost guarantee it would slip and slide its way into the ditch in the winter and would not get me out of the muddy fields at a horse show in the summer.

VERY unpopular here with big trailer owners. Plus the added expense of the truck to purchase, additional tires to maintain and simply driving the thing into normal size parking spaces.

If I was a building contractor with loads of bricks or heavy material back there maybe....but hauling a large trailer behind no way.

cssutton
Oct. 22, 2009, 09:11 AM
Tallyyo:

I think most of us thought we were helping either a greenie or someone with little or no knowledge.

Now it turns out you have a dually, you know all you need to know about duallys and you really aren't going to change your mind.

So the long posts several of us made in an effort to help were a complete waste of time.

CSSJR

jcotton
Oct. 22, 2009, 09:29 AM
I have a 350 dually diesel 4WD. Won't anything but a dually for hauling. This is my 3rd Ford diesel dually. And my 1st with 4WD. Will always have 4WD on my next truck.

My recommendation for you is to stay with your truck. Let your boyfriend get his own single rear end truck.

Guilherme
Oct. 22, 2009, 09:51 AM
Never had a dually, so I was wrong on rotating tires.

However, I stand by everything else I posted. That is my real world on the road experience.

Duallys are a total waste unless you are pulling something that requires a high rear axle load and a properly loaded 4 horse trailer does not have a high hitch load.

CSSJR

Ah, if you've never had one how do you know that "Duallys are a total waste unless you are pulling something that requires a high rear axle load..."? Or are you exercising the perogatives of your poetic license? :confused:

How did you come to the conclusion that "a properly loaded 4 horse trailer does not have a high hitch load." Have you towed every different type of horse trailer there is under every possible set of circumstances?

The DRW had limits in town; anybody who's ever driven one has learned this (and some of us The Hard Way). But the physics of the situation is that the DRW does improve stability by widening the towing base and better distributing the hitch load to the ground. And it does allow one to have a flat and limp to a safe area for changing (at least on a rear tire).

Your misreading of the OP's experience hardly makes your presentation a "waste of time" as it adds an example of "real world experience" to the mix. But lots of the rest of us have real world experience, too. ;)

G.

JSwan
Oct. 22, 2009, 12:41 PM
You buy the vehicle that you need for the load you're towing, driving conditions, and type of driving you need to do with the vehicle.

When looking at vehicles - look beyond the 150-250-350 designation and really figure out how much its rated to tow. The vehicle may look like it's got a lot of muscle but under the hood it's a 98lb weakling.

I think dually's are fantastic but if you need to get into parking garages, drive thru's, car washes, or run around town it may not be practical. Doesn't mean it's a bad choice - only that it's a bad choice for YOU.

It really depends on what YOU intend to do with the vehicle, what you'll be towing, etc.

No matter which type of vehicle you choose - if you don't know how to tow a live load safely the number of tires is really irrelevant. :)

chism
Oct. 22, 2009, 06:55 PM
OP - Try towing someone's large trailer with a horse or two using a regular truck and see how you feel. If you're currently a dually owner...I have a feeling you'll have a strong opinion. ;)
I own a Chevy 3500 dually, have a 4 horse stock and haul 3-4 horses frequently. I know this is going to sound strange...but when towing with my truck I never even think about the trailer (figuratively..not literally). There's no drag, no sway...it's like I'm not pulling anything. It's easy. :) Recently my truck's engine crapped out and I've been forced to borrow my FIL's truck which is not a dually. I've only used it to tow one or two horses at a time and I am aware of the trailer just about every second I drive. If one of the horses moves or worse...turns around in the stock...it's really obvious in the movement of the trailer with the lighter truck. Borrowing it was the best un-intentional endorsement for the dually.

FWIW - I have had a rear flat tire with my dually and was able to drive to a gas station with a loaded trailer.

chism
Oct. 22, 2009, 07:03 PM
Duallys are a total waste unless you are pulling something that requires a high rear axle load and a properly loaded 4 horse trailer does not have a high hitch load.

CSSJR

It's interesting that those of us who've actually towed with both types of trucks feel otherwise.
People can (and should) buy what they like, but I respectfully disagree with your statement on several levels.

lauriep
Oct. 22, 2009, 07:05 PM
Tallyyo:

I think most of us thought we were helping either a greenie or someone with little or no knowledge.

Now it turns out you have a dually, you know all you need to know about duallys and you really aren't going to change your mind.

So the long posts several of us made in an effort to help were a complete waste of time.

CSSJR

She stated in her OP that she had one and the BF wanted to get rid of it. She seemed to be looking for good arguments to use in support of keeping the dually. And she got some.

cssutton
Oct. 22, 2009, 08:00 PM
To sum up some of the criticisms of my posts:

I spent 56 years traveling the east coast as an equipment distributor. I know when my vehicle is doing what it should.

So if I know that I can't tell if my F350 is pulling the trailer unless I look in the mirrors, except of course when passing the truck is not as quick, why do I need to drive a dually to determine that it is a waste of money?

Tell me first how a dually can improve on a truck that drives exactly the same pulling or not?

As for those who keep saying that a single rear tire does not handle well pulling a trailer, I would tell you that you don't know how to spec a truck. And borrowing someone else's truck and then complaining about it....well what tires were on it? Did you inflate them using a digital gauge? What was the rear spring? Did it have the camper kit? The camper kit has a heavier rear spring, anti sway bars all around and is set up for top heavy loads so it is much more stable. I have spec'ed all of mine with the camper option.

What rear axle?

Unless you know all of the above, you can't make a reasonable comparison.

Buy what you please. If you don't know how to spec a truck, you had better buy a dually.

As for the hitch load comment, a 4 horse trailer, which was the object of discussion, should have a maximum hitch load of 1,000 to 1,200 lbs. Loaded properly, the hitch load should be less. That is nothing to a single tire F350.

I did comment that if you have one of those really heavy living quarters trailers, with all of the options, the F350 was probably not enough and one should look at either the F450 or 550. Obviously that means dual wheels. The last Ford brochure I read said that those trucks come with duals only.

I have already pulled my trailer 15,000 miles with this present truck, not measured and logged, but based on trips I make, knowing the distance and knowing how many times I have made the trips in the last 18 months.

As I have put 54,000 total on the truck in that 18 months, I believe I know what it feels like empty as well as loaded.

Now I have said what I have to say.

I don't care who buys what. I was and am only relating my experience in the hope that it will help someone.

So, end of thread for me.

CSSJR

Joyrider
Oct. 22, 2009, 08:38 PM
This thread has been very informative. I was the first to respond and said that I prefer the dually but having said that, if I did get a straight job again and wanted to tow, I would be well armed with all that great information. Thanks!

Tom King
Oct. 22, 2009, 09:12 PM
A lot of people feel comfortable pulling with a 4 wheeler. I don't.

LAZ
Oct. 22, 2009, 10:31 PM
I've had the same truck (F350 crew cab, super duty) in two configurations: one gas non-dually & the same year & spec but diesel & dually.

I hate the dually when I have to drive it around town, I'm always afraid I'm going to whack something. But I do really like it for hauling better than I like the single rear wheel truck. This past weekend I had a weird trip home from the KHP--first I ran over a mattress on I-75 -- the car in front of me darted into the next lane & I saw the mattress, but I had a semi on one side & a car on the other side & it was a direct hit. Then later (on the OTHER side of Cincinnati) a truck spat a weedeater out of the bed & I had a really hard dodge & brake to avoid it (I managed to avoid the shaft, but the motor went bouncing along the under carriage of truck & trailer).

I was really glad I had the dually when I hit the brakes & dodged, and I was glad I had an extra set of wheels as I ran over the mattress at 65 MPH. Luckily my truck and trailer were unscathed, but dang I was glad for the stability!

So my .02 is that I'll keep the dually for hauling, though it is a pain in all other aspects.

CatOnLap
Oct. 23, 2009, 01:39 AM
My last tow vehicle was, at first glance, much too small to pull the 7000 lb trailer it towed with nary a complaint for 15 years. It was a 2WD short box, 5.0 L, auto, F150. And as commonly equipped, yes, it was inadequate. But as mine was equipped-ordered from the factory, fitted out to carry a large camper and tow a large boat, with low gear ratios, extra tranny cooler, extra leafs and beefed up shocks, bigger wheels and tires etc, it did a great job. And would be an exceptionally rare model to find.

But the commonest dually will pull a fairly large horse trailer comfortably. I don't know about towing with a single rear wheel F350- from reading the one fan's posts, it seems he/she has a pretty special single rear wheel truck that is specifically "spec'd" with larger wheels, beefed up springs and sway bars, etc, to do the job. And the person is a very experienced professional driver, which most of us aren't. Works for them.

I must say I covet my friend's 2 wheel drive F350 Dually because it sits way lower than my 4WD one and hers looks so sporty! But then, crawling up my very steep, rain slick driveway in low 4WD with the dually, I am glad that I have the one I have.

I do agree about the tires though. When I got my truck, I kitted it out with 7 brand new Michelins, which the tire guy assures me I can rotate. It made the truck quieter and "stickier" on the road than the stock tires. And 6 Michelins cost me about $1300, only about $200 more than the replacement stock tires were.

I was always conscious of the trailer in the F150. I really do have to look in the mirrors from time to time with the F350. It seems to me the dually gives a softer ride than friends who haul with single rear wheels, but as the poster says, those trucks may not have been kitted out properly for the job they are doing.

Bravestrom
Oct. 23, 2009, 08:05 AM
I own a three horse with full living quarters 8 feet wide. We live in Ontario, Canada and experience a LOT of snow in the winter and mud! in the spring and summer. There is no way I would pull my trailer with a dually. I would almost guarantee it would slip and slide its way into the ditch in the winter and would not get me out of the muddy fields at a horse show in the summer. ...

We too are in Ontario and my sons event - there have been many occasions when our 3/4 ton 4wd GMC Sierra Diesel has had no difficulty getting through muddy fields while we wiz by the duallies stuck in the mud - wouldn't change our truck for a dually - we have a 4 horse with tack gn and very large horses.

Our truck has gotten us through many situations that I know a dually would not have.

CatOnLap
Oct. 23, 2009, 01:33 PM
I have heard that argument before- that the 6 wheel dually, with a greater bearing surface in the back, will have less pounds per square inch pressure on the road and therefore will slip more in slippery conditions, than a 4 wheel truck. The opposite argument I have heard is that having the greater bearing surface, the dually doesn't have to dig in as deep because there is more surface gripping the road, and therefore will perform better than a 4 wheel. Those arguers say that a 4 wheel is more likely to sink to its axles than a dually. I really don't know which is correct, or if, more likely, in some situations a dually is better beacuse it has more surface area to push against and won't sink, and in others, the 2 wheel is better because it puts more pressure per square inch and will grip a firm but slippery surface better. Frankly, on black ice I doubt it matters much, and may depend more on what sort of tires you have equipped your truck with. In the ice on this coast, with 4 ice radial tires on my little SMART, it performs better than most or the SUV's that are 4WD but only equipped with "all seasons".

Regarding proper tires, I know in our last big snow storm last winter, where we got 2 feet of snow in about 48 hours, our dually was one of the few trucks on the road during the storm and as long as we went slowly, had no trouble at all. And our SMART went out and did all our night deliveries as usual during the snow. Many of our delivery customers were afraid to venture out in their SUV's and were amazed to see the SMART crawling up their driveways. But it was those precious soft rubber snow tires.

We do not change to winter tires in the dually. But we do have chains just in case and have not had to put them on yet.

TXnGA
Oct. 23, 2009, 08:11 PM
Growing up we had 2 trucks to haul with: a dually 4x4 and a single tire 4x4. We mostly hauled to shows with the dually, otherwise I would be hauling with the single tire.

Our trailer was a 3 horse reverse slant, with a mid tack and full LQ. Fully loaded- it was heavy!!! I felt more comfortable pulling with the dually because it had more stability.

I once had a blow out on my single tire truck hauling the trailer down a major highway- luckily i was going to pick up a horse and didn't have him already on board. When the tire blew I thought I had been hit by a mack truck. It blew so hard it bent the frame on the wheel well of the truck and the truck and trailer were jerked out of the lane I was driving in, into the the fast lane. I was lucky that there was nobody beside me- boy did it freak me out!! I was shaking a little afterwards because I had never had a blow out that bad before.

Also, the single axle tire truck's brakes had to be replaced at 65k miles because the trailer was so heavy that it took a lot of braking to slow it down.

I wouldn't let anyone tell me what I felt better hauling with. yeah the single axle is easier for every day use, but the dually wins hands down for hauling. It is really your decision, not your Bf.

shakeytails
Oct. 23, 2009, 08:25 PM
I don't have a big trailer- just a 3H slant- and I've pulled it with both a dually (1 ton gas 2wd) and now a 3/4 ton single rear axle 4wd diesel. Honestly, there really isn't any noticeable difference in handling.

Those dual wheels probably saved my butt when hauling an unbalanced trailer load of lumber a few years ago. That trailer started fish-tailing bad at about 35 mph and I could hear the duals chirping across the road as the trailer tried to take the truck with it. Talk about white knuckles and heart pounding! I don't think single tires could have handled it.

Tom King
Oct. 24, 2009, 11:17 PM
I pulled out a crew cab 4 wheeler once that was stuck up to the axles with my dually. All you have to do is push the unstuck button on the dash.

Foxtrot's
Oct. 24, 2009, 11:48 PM
At the Mane Event this w/e we were drooling over a monster 3 horse with large living quarters plus push out in the living room. The rep recommended a dually 350. He did not actually say 'do not use a single axle' possibly because he had sales to do, but that was his reccomendation, ise a dually.

ThirdCharm
Oct. 25, 2009, 07:56 AM
Yes, interesting that those who have actually OWNED both are saying duallies are the way to go.

I've had both and duallies are superior with a large load.

I'm trying to figure out how two more tires (50% increase in materials and labor) results in a approx. 80% increase in cost of replacing tires. Somebody saw somebody coming from a mile away is all I can figure....! I put six michelins on my dually for less than they put four on for....

Never had any more difficulty in slippery situations with a dually as opposed to a single wheel, I would not compare myself getting a single-wheeler unstuck with others driving a dually who are having difficulty, the number of people at the average show who do not know how to drive, PERIOD, is horrifying. The dual rear wheels will not "dig" as well in slippery/loose footing (mud, loose gravel), which is what that button on the dash is for. The advantages far outweigh the disadvantages.

Re: no problems for a 'properly spec'd' SWT hauling a 'properly loaded' etc. etc. 4 horse.... whoopee. If conditions are PERFECT you can haul a 3h trailer with an F150. Big whup. I'm more worried about what happens when a tire blows or a semi tries to run you off the road on a 9% downgrade.

Jennifer

Hattie
Oct. 25, 2009, 08:45 AM
I'm another one that is going to chime in about owning both a F350 4x4 dually and a F250 4x4 single - there is NO comparision when hauling a large trailer, the dually all the way!! I can't tell that I'm hauling anything with the dually, the F250 has a "mushy" slightly sway feeling. If I only had the F250 then I'm sure I could live with it, but since I have a choice I haul with the dually. I do admit that it is hard for day to day driving, but I'm used to parking out at the end of every parking lot and I'm very careful driving through the drive-in teller at the bank.

You can also rotate the tires, however they do have to be removed off the rims in order to accomplish the rotation, therefore costing more. My Ford dealer only charged me an additional $10 for this.

mrsbradbury
Oct. 25, 2009, 12:18 PM
I would keep your dually if it fits into your life and you haul a fair amount. I am in a situation where i feel I don't have enough truck, and have spent over $2000 in suspension, air bag systems, braking to feel comfortable. Once my loan is done, I will be getting more truck. I currently have sinlge tire 4x4, chevy.

I have driven both duallys and single tires with many many different trailers, and feel that duallys balance a gooseneck horse trailer better.

We are not talking about bricks, we are talking about horses. You can live with a single tired truck just fine, and can get cool things to make it feel better.

Just my input: Boyfriend? right. Who owns the title to the truck? you?;)

Tom King
Oct. 25, 2009, 05:10 PM
I don't understand having to take the tires off the rims to rotate tires. I just rotated mine a few weeks ago and I've never had to take tires off. The offset is the same on all the wheels. The back ones just have them facing opposite directions.

Also, my dually tires last WAY longer than any on the 4 wheel trucks. The tires I rotated have 84,000 miles on them and are good for at least another 10,000. I never put anything like that much on 1/2 ton or 3/4 ton tires before and the ones on the 3/4 are the same tires. So I'm not convinced that overall tire cost is more just because you have six. The inside tires on the back last so long that by rotating them around a couple of times the tire milage really goes up there. I dont' follow any kind of schedule. I just look at them and rotate when some wear more than others. I think this is the second or third time I've rotating them during those 84,000 miles.

By the way, made for Sears by Michelin, XCX/APT. Plenty of grip and not too loud.

kellidahorsegirl
Oct. 25, 2009, 05:26 PM
I think if you like your dually, then definitely stick with it.....it also sounds like you'd be more comfy with it as well...and comfy driving leads to SAFE driving ;)

My OWN situation just to share (I really don't care which you buy haha and have NOT ever hauled with a dually):
We own a 26' long 8' wide stock trailer and a 2005 1ton 6 speed 4x4 dodge (4 wheels). I have many times hauled a full load of pregnant cows (11 head at about 1200 lbs each) with this Dodge and hauling cattle, there is MOVEMENT because they don't stand still and shove. However, they were unable to make the drive bad...you could feel it but definitely hold onto it just fine.
I've also hauled with it full of horses (6 total) and they don't move around much at all and the ride was smooth as can be. The power with that pickup is amazing too and you only notice there's a load back there when stopping haha

Tires, power of vehicle, amount of weight to haul, etc are all factors for you to think about. BUT I also stand by "if it ain't broke, don't fix it". Yes you could "downgrade" to 4 wheels if it'll work, but its important that you are COMFORTABLE and feel safe with your tow vehicle.

Hattie
Oct. 25, 2009, 07:06 PM
Tom King - My Ford has 3 DIFFERENT pair of wheels, thus the having to remove tires from the wheels(rims) in order to rotate the tires around.

Guilherme
Oct. 26, 2009, 06:12 AM
Tom King - My Ford has 3 DIFFERENT pair of wheels, thus the having to remove tires from the wheels(rims) in order to rotate the tires around.

I can see "why" on the type of rotation you must do but I'm not sure of "why" you would have 3 different types of wheels. That's kind of bizarre!

One alternative would be a trip to your local used parts yard and getting six matching wheels; that would save you the extra charge and they would likely pay for themselves in two or three rotations.

G.

camohn
Oct. 26, 2009, 07:32 AM
Just wondering about other peoples' thoughts and experiences pulling larger trailers with trucks that are not dual tire. I have always pulled my four horse with living quarters with a dually (Ford F350 Super Duty), but my boyfriend wants to trade it in for a standard F350 (with only four tires!)! I don't feel comfortable with this type of tow vehicle. I have had several tire blow outs with the dually and barely felt it. How will a regular truck handle a blow out, or a sudden manuver to avoid an idiot who slams the breaks on right in front of you, or other emergency situation? I was told the tow vehicle should be as wide, if not wider than the trailer. Is this true? I would appreciate any feed back!
We have a regular non dually F350 as I used to drive it to work as well and a dually was too hard to park there. It drives more than fine. I have had one blow out (last month!) for the first time in 10 years of owning the truck. Granted it was at slow speed and not on a highway. Yeah, it is a bigger PIA to have to unhook the trailer and fix it before you can go anywhere/can drive a bit before you fix it on a dually............but for me 10 years of better parking have outweighed the one flat tire.
When we got married hubby had a dually and I had a non dually. His dually DID slip more for regular driving on wet and snowy roads. He happily got rid of his dually and bought a sports car to drive to work at that time/we didn't need 2 trucks.