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View Full Version : Hot Shoeing vs. Cold Shoeing



missysnarky
Oct. 16, 2009, 02:08 PM
My friend accused me of abusing my horses because my farrier hot shoes them. If you knew me you would know that my lawn ornaments are NOT abused. Just the opposite. Let me know what you think about hot vs. cold shoes.

JenEM
Oct. 16, 2009, 02:36 PM
I'm guessing she thinks its abusive because she thinks it hurts? My sensitive mare doesn't blink an eye at being hot shod. If it really hurt them, I'd think the horses would object more to the process; the one's I've seen troubled were bothered by the smoke, not the shoe itself.

In my experience, it provides a better fit for the shoe, thus a better shoe for the horse. Coincidentally, she's also never lost a shoe that's been put on hot.

dags
Oct. 16, 2009, 03:08 PM
Had never seen cold shoeing till I got to California! I'm a hot shoe advocate through and through. Toughens the feet and fits the shoe so much more securely.

alteringwego
Oct. 17, 2009, 10:29 AM
My farrier says there are 2 sins a farrier can make: a) hammering cold steel b) and not charging enough

If your friend thinks hot shoeing is abuse then she doesn't know enough to even worry about her opinion. Most good farriers hot shoe: better fit and better for the feet

Thomas_1
Oct. 17, 2009, 11:00 AM
All my shod horses are hot shod. It's not unusual at all over here. Indeed that tends to be the norm in the UK where its wet and muddy. Its seals the hoof wall.

Likewise those that are shod in the main have clips: Particularly with the driving horses a strong well positioned clip can help to hold the shoe in place and a slightly squared toe on the hind shoe, with a toe clip also aids purchase.

If you're using a clip on the shoe, then if its burned in you get a better fit and greater stability.

If a farrier hot shoes a horse then he has the benefit of being able to forge the shoe to ensure it precisely fits. The fact that its burned in means that the hoof wall is exactly in the image of the shoe.

I presume that anyone who thinks it's "abuse" doesn't actually know what the process entails or understand equine physiology or even horses come to that.

Fixerupper
Oct. 17, 2009, 11:21 AM
Agreed...but I have found that horses with weak 'shelly' feet do better with cold shoeing...the heated shoe seems to burn too much moisture out of the horn.
Cold shoeing is harder work for the farrier to do well...much more pounding on steel, harder on the elbows ;)



(now waiting for the shoeing/no shoeing nazi hordes to descend)

unbridledoaks
Oct. 17, 2009, 11:43 AM
I have always had my horses shod hot. Never had a problem with my horses.

mybeau1999
Oct. 17, 2009, 11:43 AM
(now waiting for the shoeing/no shoeing nazi hordes to descend)

:lol::lol::lol:

klmck63
Oct. 17, 2009, 11:48 AM
I would always opt for hot shoeing. Seems to provide a much better fit and like Thomas said, since my horses both have clips on their shoes, it helps give the clips a good place to grip.

The only time I have had one of my horses done cold was when she needed aluminum shoes which as I understood it, can not be done hot.

Seems like this person is akin to the people who gasp when you say your horses have their feet trimmed because surely it's cruelty to CUT off their TOES! :lol:

dani0303
Oct. 17, 2009, 12:13 PM
All of ours that are shod with clips (all of the show horses that have shoes) are hot shod.

The BO's trail horses are the only ones that are cold shod.

Like everyone else has said, hot shoeing provides a much better fit and therefore a much better shoeing job. Our hot shod horses rarely lose shoes

Go Fish
Oct. 17, 2009, 02:17 PM
I prefer hot shoeing for all the reasons stated here. I think cold shoeing takes less time, that's why so many farriers are going that route now. The farrier my trainer uses cold shoes. I don't like it. My gelding's feet are definately going downhill, although it doesn't seem to affect my mare at all.

Finding a good farrier is like finding a good gynocologist. It makes my teeth hurt.

ontarget
Oct. 17, 2009, 02:51 PM
Agreed...but I have found that horses with weak 'shelly' feet do better with cold shoeing...the heated shoe seems to burn too much moisture out of the horn.

And I would respectfully disagree with even that, or at least in my case. One of my horses had some of the weakest, shelly feet around, and the transformation with hot shoeing has been stunning. At first, when my farrier (first time he was shoeing for me) said he wanted to put shoes on (horse was barefoot at the time because I thought his feet were so terrible they couldn't hold a shoe), I was VERY hesitant, but I went ahead and went with what he recommended. I'm so glad I did. In two shoeing, the horse now has beautiful feet and is back in full work when I thought his hooves would take six months in order to be able to sustain any kind of jumping. He went from having no sole with shelly, deteriorating feet to hooves that look like he never had any issues in the first place. Amazing.

forestergirl99
Oct. 17, 2009, 03:29 PM
And I would respectfully disagree with even that, or at least in my case. One of my horses had some of the weakest, shelly feet around, and the transformation with hot shoeing has been stunning. At first, when my farrier (first time he was shoeing for me) said he wanted to put shoes on (horse was barefoot at the time because I thought his feet were so terrible they couldn't hold a shoe), I was VERY hesitant, but I went ahead and went with what he recommended. I'm so glad I did. In two shoeing, the horse now has beautiful feet and is back in full work when I thought his hooves would take six months in order to be able to sustain any kind of jumping. He went from having no sole with shelly, deteriorating feet to hooves that look like he never had any issues in the first place. Amazing.

Same here. My horse had really shelly feet when I got him, and since he's been hot shod, his feet have changed dramatically.

dogchushu
Oct. 17, 2009, 03:43 PM
How is it abuse? If it burned the animal's feet, does she think any horse would calmly stand there in nothing but cross ties and take it?