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View Full Version : Greenie Support Group.. where are you???



pippa553
Oct. 15, 2009, 01:03 PM
I've been going from having great days to days where I want to give up riding forever :no:. I need your support! Please share your greenie woes with me...

LuvMyTB
Oct. 15, 2009, 01:20 PM
Preach on, sista, preach on! :lol:

My greenie is generally consistently good, but the last week has been...interesting. Head up, eyes bugged, warp speed trot, stiff as a 2x4. I'm blaming it on the weather.

So frustrating, because I started him over fences last week and was a champ--hopped over some crossrails, a verrrrry small vertical, and even did a bounce (second element was just half an X). I was so proud of him. Two days later, he was so wound up that he was running out of the trot poles. *sigh*

nlk
Oct. 15, 2009, 01:31 PM
Weather for sure!!!!! Just remember we love our Greenies!!!!

They have just decided that either

A) we need to keep warm with the colder weather so they have graciously offered to help keep the blood flowing

or

B) we've all gotten a bit heavier with the winter "Fluff" in the ways of extra layers and possibly weight so they have all decided to help us by amping up the workout regime


:lol::lol::lol::lol:

tBHj
Oct. 15, 2009, 01:33 PM
When I first started riding my mare she didn't want to trot at all. Two steps and then it was off to the canter (she never trotted anywheres as a foal). I'm lucky that she naturally holds her head where it should be so the head up thing was never an issue.

Parker_Rider
Oct. 15, 2009, 01:48 PM
I can offer a story of hope for the Greenie Support Group!
I got my mare when she was 4, couldn't jump a course for the life of her or keep her lllloooonnnngggg legs under her.

Now, I've had her for 8 years, she's had 3 years off due to injury/babymaking, and she is AWESOME, totally doesn't bat an eye at anything. While we get into "girl fights" she does anything I ask of her. Wouldn't trade her for anything.

But there were days, in those first 2 years, when I just wanted to scream and sell her to the first bidder because she was impossible - stubborn, teenager-like, mare. Ohmygod, I swore I'd never deal with it again... I'll be coming back here in a year and a half when I'm dealing with the mare's filly. :P

Remember.. we do this to ourselves because when they're awesome we can grin, point and say "I did that!"

Vesper Sparrow
Oct. 15, 2009, 01:52 PM
Recently, I had a week or so of my four year old being a real pill. Not bucking or anything but just saying he didn't feel like being in the program. He was not only stiff as a 2 x 4, but he discovered a fun, new and interesting evasion where he tilts his head up and in on the right rein. Like a giraffe with a sore neck. Very cute.

On those days, I am very thankful for my 25 year old who is always dying to get out and work...

Buglet
Oct. 15, 2009, 01:56 PM
When I first started riding my mare as a 3 year old, all I wanted to do was ride my other well broke horse. I would just pay my trainer to ride the greenie. Some days she was quiet and would barely trot, other days she would do the big extended trot (without me asking:)) I was very afraid to canter her (HUGE stride). She is now 5 and is my favorite horse to ride. This was our first year of showing over fences (2'6"). The beginning was very rough. She is very brave and thought she knew how to do it all. Needless to say, she consistently left strides out because I couldn't get her to compact her stride. It is the end of the season and she is going wonderfully, and I finally feel ready to move her up to the bigger stuff.
Just remember that your horse probably just as frustrated as you. I think it took about a year for my mare to learn what exactly I was asking of her and for her to become tolerant of my mistakes.

EquineRider
Oct. 15, 2009, 02:42 PM
I'm on the same boat as everyone else. My horse is five and I just got him over the summer. We've had our good days but for some reason he HATES the indoor arena and refuses to pick up his right lead. He gets it fine outside... ugh. I can't wait until the rides get more and more consistant. I haven't jumped him yet, but he does canter over poles and can navigate trotting poles well after a try or two.

amylmac
Oct. 15, 2009, 02:54 PM
My " greenie" caused me to have a fall resulting in the first and hopefully last broken bone of my life. He went on to be the horse of a lifetime; evented through prelim., took my daughter safely over many, many jumps and to several medal finals, taught numerous riders how to navigate a course and is now my chief babysitter for my weanlings at the ripe old age of 27. He has had his moments over the years but never anything rank or dishonest. Maybe yours will be that special one too.

SprinklerBandit
Oct. 15, 2009, 02:59 PM
My greenie just had two good days in row. Unfortunately, it rained today, so I didn't get to ride. Still, it happens occasionally. If she keeps having good days, we may even get to jump before winter. Hooray!

Good luck with yours. It will get better.

NeverEnd
Oct. 15, 2009, 03:45 PM
My used-to-be-greenie is a stallion. Forget consistency, I still get a "new horse" everday.

mikali
Oct. 15, 2009, 04:25 PM
My used-to-be-greenie is a stallion. Forget consistency, I still get a "new horse" everday.

Oh, I'm right there with my 3yo stallion!

Of course, right now he seems to be going through the everything should go in my mouth stage for the second time in his life (last time he was yearling)... Of course, this could be because I recently brought out the winter blankets again and he thinks it's fantastic to pull on the front corners, so why shouldn't he be allowed to put the leadshank, reins, towel, jacket, etc. in there too :no:

My all-time favorite greenie move is "I can steer today but don't expect me to steer tomorrow"!!

Peggy
Oct. 15, 2009, 06:33 PM
They do grow up, tho it's pretty essential to enjoy the process as well as the end product. Not saying you should enjoy every moment of the process.

I was a member of the original BGSG with Star who is now 10. So, we survived and I have a lovely horse to show for it. A couple of times recently my trainer has commented to people that I've had Star since he was two, did most of the riding myself, and did an amazing job. Definitely helped to have a horse with a good mind, a lot of good help, and a sense of humor.

Heinz 57
Oct. 15, 2009, 06:33 PM
Count me in.

My greenie is a four year old TB mare (at least she's a bay, and not a chestnut). I've had her since February, and she's been under saddle since March. I just started her over fences this week, and thankfully that part was GREAT. I've taken her over a small crossrail (<12") or two in the past, but didn't feel like she was really ready to focus and definitely didn't really know where her legs were. She ended her first session with a ~2' crossrail, two strides to a caution-striped-plank vertical at about 2'3" with placing poles through the whole thing. She was quiet as a church mouse and the placing poles in the two stride really gave her a nice canter to jump out of. No rushing, diving, or bulging, just a quiet relaxed trot in, canter out, on soft contact with a quiet halt about six strides after.

However.

At any moment you may experience random acts of bulging, leaning, head tilting and/or twisting, loss of steering, lack of responsiveness, sluggishness or loss of impulsion, excessive and/or sudden impulsion, possibly in combination with any of the previously mentioned side effects of being a four year old TB mare. You may also expect to experience bouts of irrational attitude, which may include but is not limited to tail swishing, ear pinning, or just plain feigning ignorance or deafness. An occasional buck and/or rear has been previously sighted but at this time is not to be expected, and definitely not tolerated.


But let me tell you: when she is good, OH MAN, is she GOOD. And the ratio of good days to bad days is getting better and better. :)

War Admiral
Oct. 15, 2009, 06:47 PM
I am SO in this clique. Glad somebody revived it.

There are just plain days when you would swear on a stack of Bibles that Quattro's brain was made out of Twinkies. You know the kind I mean... The kind of day when there are at least 60 things higher on his priority list than listening to YOU... But I think the most depressing thing is that he's 3.5 and consensus of the "older and wiser" side of me, plus vet, plus trainer ALL think he needs another 6 months of "grow time" before we can safely start him in serious work. He's off at the trainer now being lightly started under saddle but I need to find a boarding barn w/ a bigger pasture so he can loon around over the winter and hopefully develop a bit more.

I have to try SO HARD to force myself to cancel the thought "If I had only gotten another OTTB instead, it would be nearly trained by now" and replace it with "You're sitting on the hack winner and you know it" and "he's gonna be a Really Nice Horse when he's... eight." :cool:

mojo7777
Oct. 15, 2009, 06:51 PM
Boy, can I relate to the "new horse every day." My 7 yr old ottb and I have made big progress in the year we've been together, but "potential" was about all we had in the beginning. His history is murky, but now we can boast of nice simple changes and fairly balanced gaits--most days. I've always told people that I get on a different horse every day. We've worked through rooting and pulling, balky ear-pinning, bogus spooking...you name it. Now he is pleasant and fairly consistent, loving his little cross rails and verticals, looky but not spooky trail rides. We do get the giraffe-head every now and then--provoked by the weather when it first turned cold--but I'm so proud of him and pleased with our progress. At my age, I probably shouldn't have taken on a green horse, but he fell in my lap, and I couldn't be happier!

Horseymama
Oct. 15, 2009, 08:01 PM
The other day one of my 4 yr. old mares (I've got two, yikes) decided that she was going to spook and bolt at our dog laying down next to the ring, not once but every time we went by him! I even made the dog get up and move somewhere else, but she still kept spooking at him. She's known the dog for a year and a half now. It was so ridiculous it was actually kind of funny! I literally got nothing done the entire ride.

I think when you have one of those days on a greenie you just have to take a deep breath and try again tomorrow!

wanderlust
Oct. 15, 2009, 08:37 PM
Add me to the clique! I love, love, love my 3.5 yo hano and am having a blast with him. Smart, sweet, affectionate and really enthusiastic about everything. But its hard to put him into any kind of serious work when he's grown almost a full hand in 6 months with more to go, is losing his 3.5 yo teeth one at a time and is highly displeased about it, and turnout is minimal due to the rain starting so it is like sitting on a powder keg even after a lunge. That said, he's w/t/c, started over flower boxes and trots into little baby cross-rail grids.

I'm moving him to a new barn next week where the indoor can be turnout on muddy days, and we'll work him through the winter to have him ready for the baby greens in the spring. Aiming him for the YJC series as a 5yo, but we'll see how he feels about that next year.

SOTB
Oct. 15, 2009, 08:44 PM
I feel your pain! Hang in there. I know I have the cold fall riding blues which make hard days even more frustrating!

ponycrazy111
Oct. 15, 2009, 08:53 PM
i know exactly how u feel, and i know this is not something u wanna hear right now, but hang in there!!! i got a horse when she was just 4, and i was just learning how to ride. she wuld buck me off EVRY lesson, i culd nvr get lead changes, she would spook, refuse, and everything else you culd imagine, i wanted 2 live up ridinng att least 10 times. but then i started to notce a change, slowly but surely, my pony was getting better. when i wanted 2 give up every1 kept saying ittll get better, and i got so frustrated when they said that. i would say to myself "how to u know what if she nvr gets better!!!" but she did. now she wins everything, auto leads, the whole 9 yards. i leased her out to someone b cuz i got 2 big, and evry time the ponies name is called i think 2 myself "see wht happens iff u just hang in there" now i have another green pony, and i think training the first one really helped my riding b cuz i know that when people say itttll get better, they truly mean itt, and there not just saying it 2 make me feel better. so truly it does get better and soon ull b taking home all the 1st place ribbons!!! :)

cnvh
Oct. 15, 2009, 09:06 PM
I had a Greenie Night tonight, too... My 6-y.o. OTTB is usually cow-placid and lazy as a sloth, but tonight I had to longe him pre-ride for the first time in close to a year. It rained all day, so he didn't get turnout (not usually a problem), and I also interrupted him before dinner and he knew it.

Oye vey. With all the drama at the other end of the longe line, you'd think he was trying out for PFR Saddle Bronc of the Year.

About all I can say of the post-longe ride was that we had some good leg yields, that was about it. And unfortunately it's supposed to be cold and rainy/snowy for the next 3 days (meaning likely no turnout), and I'm out of town until Monday so he won't get ridden, The best I can hope for is that the barn staff will relent to my begging and turn him out in the indoor for at least a couple of minutes if there are no lessons going on.

I'm not looking forward to Monday's ride. :(

billiebob
Oct. 15, 2009, 10:55 PM
Since the weather has gotten colder, my greenie has decided spooking is fun and stopping is overrated. Granted, he's been spooking at things like another horse flipping a salt block holder around the paddock, but this is a horse that I can ride past hay baling equipment.....while it's in use! The stopping thing is almost fun, but not the best when you're stuck in the 40m x 20m indoor!

Oh, and I haven't had time to ride him since Saturday. And I won't have time tomorrow either. That means in two days, I will have a hates-to-be-cold-and-hasn't-been-ridden-in-a-week green TB on my hands in 45 degree rainy weather.

Joy of joys. Maybe he'll surprise me and be good. You never know with greenies! :lol:

heatherny2
Oct. 15, 2009, 10:58 PM
Oh how I feel your pain. My 7 (almost 8) yr old TB/Paint, who I've had for 2 years, was going great...we were having some great rides, everything seemed to finally be progressing after several interruptions...then, out of the blue, he started getting more spooky, and spooking at one particular end of the ring that never bothered him before..he was bucking at the canter...then 2 rides in a row he spooked and bucked me off..so, we realized he had not been worked as much during the week due to my and my trainer/mother's other responsibilities, so we determined we would get him worked at least a couple times a week..well last weekend, after being lunged during the week, he was back to his normal, relaxed self...his awesome, comfortable canter..relaxed jumping...Now we know we need to keep him consistently worked or his alter ego (the bad one) comes out..of course it's supposed to get cooler down here this weekend, so I'm sure my Saturday ride will be fun, fun.

pwrpfflynn
Oct. 16, 2009, 10:17 AM
I have the ultimate greenie situation. I'm a greenie and so is my horse. I have been riding for 20 years (saddleseat) but just started jumping in May. My horse is 9 and just started jumping in May. We were doing fine until my new trainer decided I needed to trot all the crossrails instead of cantering and now he wants to take off too soon and jump too big. I know I can't miss this step in his training but will I survive it is the question. :)

LuvMyTB
Oct. 16, 2009, 02:09 PM
[QUOTE=bearcombs;4440337]At any moment you may experience random acts of bulging, leaning, head tilting and/or twisting, loss of steering, lack of responsiveness, sluggishness or loss of impulsion, excessive and/or sudden impulsion, possibly in combination with any of the previously mentioned side effects of being a four year old TB mare. You may also expect to experience bouts of irrational attitude, which may include but is not limited to tail swishing, ear pinning, or just plain feigning ignorance or deafness. An occasional buck and/or rear has been previously sighted but at this time is not to be expected, and definitely not tolerated.QUOTE]

This cracks me up--I thought I was the only one with this issue! My green TB does not have the excuse of being young (he's 10) or a mare--but he still will randomly throw in any combination of the above whenever he feels the need. Most likely to see such displays when another horse has left the arena, or when he can see all of the other oh-so-lucky horses outside in turnout while he is stuck in the arena working with mommy.

No rear or buck has been seen; however, rooting, pulling, bit-grabbing and smashing mommy's leg into the wall have all been witnessed on previous occasions.

eclipse
Oct. 16, 2009, 03:00 PM
I'll join the greenie support group. My new mare is 7, but still green & is learning fast how to buck! LOL She's generally quite willing to try anything, but every once in a while, that mare attitude comes though when she doesn't want to do something & wowza's, look out! Last Tuesday, we were going around quite happily learning how to do collected trot when suddenly she decided "she'd" had enough & her haunches flew out. I kept my leg steady & pushed them back in, so she decided to try & drop her head & BUCK!!! Of course, this stopped the exercise until I regained control, so she tried it again the next time I rode.......sigh.......greenies, gotta love 'em!! :lol:

magicteetango
Oct. 17, 2009, 02:11 PM
Thank God it's not just me. I keep repeating I love my mare, I love my mare. This whole summer she's been amazing but oh my god... the fall friskiness will be the death of me! Every time we trot anywhere near the direction to home, it's WW3. We attempt a canter pickup, and it's head swinging, grunting, and turning into a pretzel. She is just too fresh lately. And I am home sick with the flu, and haven't been riding because of that so god knows how this will go this coming week... Horrible! I keep telling myself there is light at the end of the tunnel, but boy is it frustrating at times!

EquineRider
Oct. 17, 2009, 04:57 PM
As crazy as this thread is, this is a huge sigh of relief that I'm not the only one! My greenie thought it would be fun to spook and bolt across the 100 X 200 arena today. Luckily, I stayed on but boy, it's a little unnerving sometimes! It seems like there is no fall this year, just went from summer to winter!

Jersey Fresh
Oct. 18, 2009, 08:35 PM
I had a Greenie Night tonight, too... My 6-y.o. OTTB is usually cow-placid and lazy as a sloth, but tonight I had to longe him pre-ride for the first time in close to a year. It rained all day, so he didn't get turnout (not usually a problem), and I also interrupted him before dinner and he knew it.

Oye vey. With all the drama at the other end of the longe line, you'd think he was trying out for PFR Saddle Bronc of the Year.

About all I can say of the post-longe ride was that we had some good leg yields, that was about it. And unfortunately it's supposed to be cold and rainy/snowy for the next 3 days (meaning likely no turnout), and I'm out of town until Monday so he won't get ridden, The best I can hope for is that the barn staff will relent to my begging and turn him out in the indoor for at least a couple of minutes if there are no lessons going on.

I'm not looking forward to Monday's ride. :(

I found myself one day last spring wondering if my greenie was part Lippazner as he performed near perfect caprioles on the lunge line. Luckily, usually even if he's wild on the lunge hes pretty quiet under tack. All of our horses were "perky" this past week and my baby was no exception. He was pretty good, but we too had to go back to lunging before riding for a few days. On Wednesday he was an ass and spooking at everything and anything-poles on the ground, a pumpkin, dirt, a jacket handing on a jump standard. He spooked at nothing and took off but because he is lazy lazy lazy that only resulted in a lope for about 10 strides before he decided that was a bad idea.

KitKat987
Oct. 18, 2009, 11:44 PM
I need to join the greenie support group as well :yes: I have two four year olds right now. I trailered one over to an arena for my lesson Friday night. I'll just start by saying that he is no small boy. He's a running bred QH, about 16.1 and built like a freight train, with legs to match. He is super sweet, adorable, lovey, you name it. I've been trying to get the boys out of the house a bit, just for lots of life experiences, and up until this week, they've been doing really well. We've even taken them to the mountains recently and had a very enjoyable time on a three hour ride.

Anyhow, on Friday night we get to the arena. I tack up and take him in. Typically, you could set a bomb off in front of his face and he'd maybe stop and look for a moment, then carry on like nothing happened. Very laid back.

Well - there was one 17 + hand horse, and one 18 hand horse in the ring, as well as us, another horse his size, and one smaller. OMG - you would have thought the two big ones were going to literally eat him alive :eek: They'd come towards him and he would just panic. It was actually kind of comical and I couldn't help laughing at him when he was finished trying to do the spin and bolt thing. He was absolutely petrified of them :confused: Poor guy - he had a very traumatic evening. He was going sideways and backwards so fast that I had to do a lot of apologizing for his behavior. I did get told by everyone that I can sure stick to a horse though.......

My other guy, I took to the arena today. No lesson, just a ride. He was a nutjob as well. No spooking at other horses, but there was a stud turned out nearby that made him completely mental, he tried to destroy the trailer on the way over, was high as a kite in the arena and then decided to be a jerk loading up to go home when he normally hops right in with little to no prompting.

I hope it's just this wacky weather we're having, cause they're starting to drive me a little bit crazy myself!

katlee
Oct. 19, 2009, 01:12 AM
lol...my new 5 year old, fresh off the track TB arrived yesterday :lol: We had cool, sunny fall day today with a brisk wind and man was he feeling good. Definitely made me feel that the winter of ground work I have planned is a gooood idea.

War Admiral
Oct. 19, 2009, 08:51 AM
...And then there's the OTHER side of baby greeniedom, too, which is that here I have a young horse who physically NEEDS to wait and take the winter off, and he was So... Freakin... AWESOME yesterday that it's really really tempting to keep him in training through the winter and do what, for him, would be a "rush" JUST to get him into the show ring next year.

Talk me out of it, people... My hand keeps trying to sneak over to the phone... It's like that Dr. Strangelove thing... :lol::cool: