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View Full Version : What is the proper way to round up a jumper?



Starda01
Oct. 13, 2009, 02:29 PM
I am a bit confused. I know that hunters are typically encouraged to go long and low, the body carried in an arch frame. The horse's power coming from behind and through the back. However, when I see a lot of the videos of BNT training their jumpers, the horse is much more upright in the front so that it must carry more of it weight in the hindquarters and push from there.

Do jumper trainers work to round up a horse through his back like the hunters do, is it beneficial for the training of a jumper to work like that?

I hope my question makes sense. Any input would be appreciated.

rabicon
Oct. 13, 2009, 02:46 PM
I think I understand what your asking. Top jumpers are usually hotter than your typical hunter horse. Yes, BNT do work on rounding a horse(usually in more of a dressage frame than a hunter frame) and concentrate alot on dressage in their flat work. Their goal is to get around quick and clean. Their goal is a lot different than a hunter. A hunter you want a nice pace that stays the same thru the course, nail the distances and to look nice on the flat and in the air. Jumpers should be able to adjust from extended to collect canter. Yes a lot of them will throw their head up during a course but usually they are looking at the jump :eek: You can watch some top jumpers ride in a dressage frame most of the course and then let go a few strides out from the jump. If you watch before and after the courses you will usually see them round up the horses. You do want all jumping horses to have an engine in the back and to be using it. Its just different ways of training. Hunters has taking on a different life in the last 20 years. Its not typical of the field hunters that they were based on but shows a steady nice consitant horse. Jumpers are to get it done.

eclipse
Oct. 13, 2009, 03:13 PM
I would also say that conformation has something to do with it as well. When you compare the top jumpers and hunters, they tend to be built differently. If you look at the jumpers, their necks come out of the shoulders a lot higher set than a typical hunter and that will influence how high or low they can carry their heads as well!

RyuEquestrian
Oct. 13, 2009, 04:33 PM
I've found that it differs between horses. For instance, I have one jumper where the key with her is self carriage, so I tend to ride her in a more upright frame and more collected. It's far too easy for her to go long and low and not use her hind end. This mare's build is quite heavy and lanky.

Pic- she's a bit longer and lower than I would like in this photo-http://photos-a.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs257.snc1/10423_543880322415_10402430_32233800_6472913_n.jpg
The frame I aim for with this mare (more upright and collected): http://photos-d.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs277.snc1/10423_543927612645_10402430_32235851_699123_n.jpg


I have another jumper that tends to go in a medium frame. She is much more short coupled, than the previously mentioned mare, with a fairly short neck, and she has no problem with self carriage. On the flat she naturally tends to go on in a more upright frame, but there is no need to make it overly so by rocking her back on her hind end.

Pic: http://photos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs184.snc1/6136_543407844265_10402430_32213650_1291250_n.jpg

The third jumper, is a bit longer than the mare just mentioned with most of her length being in her neck. She tends to go more like a hunter, a bit longer a bit lower in the frame, however she too isn't heavy and has her own self carriage

Pic: http://photos-b.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs124.snc1/5336_543014482565_10402430_32194481_6832866_n.jpg
http://photos-g.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs102.snc1/4763_540570465395_10402430_32072782_4225469_n.jpg
http://photos-f.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs102.snc1/4763_540570460405_10402430_32072781_999871_n.jpg

So in these three experiences working with these young jumpers, I think that long and low is great to get them working through their back (and I certainly always trot my horses out long and low at the end of a session to relax), but it depends on the horse's conformation and natural way of going and can be counter productive if the horse tends to be a bit lacking in natural self carriage.

meupatdoes
Oct. 13, 2009, 05:01 PM
Every horse regardless of discipline should be fully gymnaticized.

The horse should go in many different frames during each school -from long and low to higher and shorter and back to long and low again and everything in between. Just like you practice lengthening and shortening the stride, you practice lengthening and shortening the frame. Somebody should be able to stand by the side of the ring and call out anyplace they want your horse's head to be, and because you have fully gymnaticized your horse and schooled him well, you should both be able to promptly comply.

A horse should not be ridden in one particular, discipline-dependent frame.
You fully gymnaticize the horse and train him to follow your contact to whereever you want his head, and THEN from that you select whichever frame best suits your training/schooling/showing needs in that particular moment.

RyuEquestrian
Oct. 13, 2009, 05:03 PM
Every horse regardless of discipline should be fully gymnaticized.

The horse should go in many different frames during each school -from long and low to higher and shorter and back to long and low again and everything in between. Just like you practice lengthening and shortening the stride, you practice lengthening and shortening the frame. Somebody should be able to stand by the side of the ring and call out anyplace they want your horse's head to be, and because you have fully gymnaticized your horse and schooled him well, you should both be able to promptly comply.

A horse should not be ridden in one particular, discipline-dependent frame.
You fully gymnaticize the horse and train him to follow your contact to whereever you want his head, and THEN from that you select whichever frame best suits your training/schooling/showing needs in that particular moment.

Agreed. That is what I strive for when working with these youngsters. One day I shall hopefully be able to deem them "fully Gymnasticized"....