PDA

View Full Version : Anyone watching USEF Finals?



Release First
Oct. 11, 2009, 09:11 AM
Any opinions of the course etc?

elv21love
Oct. 11, 2009, 09:14 AM
i am! i think the course is good, i like that they have so many options. they really need to be decisive and have a plan before they go into the ring to be successful.

annabellee
Oct. 11, 2009, 09:25 AM
please where are you watching? im reading mollys blog but would love to watch

Release First
Oct. 11, 2009, 09:40 AM
http://live.todocast.tv/template.multi-add_16x9_clogo.php?EventNumber=TDC-E1165

annabellee
Oct. 11, 2009, 09:47 AM
thankyou.

akrogirl
Oct. 11, 2009, 11:10 AM
Just logged in to see a beautiful ride by #108 - didn't get a name though.

ETA - looks like it was Jaime Steinhaus

Jest
Oct. 11, 2009, 11:29 AM
Chase's trip was flawless. These kids would do well to watch him. So soft and quiet and smart.

elv21love
Oct. 11, 2009, 11:45 AM
chase was awesome, i agree!

Renn/aissance
Oct. 11, 2009, 11:54 AM
Bummed not to be up there watching this year, but from the diagram, this year's course looks AWESOME. A very thinking, technical ride.

elv21love
Oct. 11, 2009, 11:57 AM
yes, i agree that the course is quite technical. it seems like people are having the most trouble with the five to one to one, a lot of people are chipping into the oxer, and then doing two in the one and having to pull out before the out of the second one stride.

shmon
Oct. 11, 2009, 02:09 PM
Did the feed just die for anyone else?

Renn/aissance
Oct. 11, 2009, 02:12 PM
Those of you who are seeing it: in your opinion, given the trouble with the bending five to the combination, does it make sense to plan to take a more conservative turn and use six strides from 3 to 4A to establish a good stride to the combination? (It seems from the course map and the photo on COTH that four strides, while possible, would be asking for trouble.) Is there a common denominator to the errors at fence 3--the line they use for the turn from 2 to 3?

shmon
Oct. 11, 2009, 02:22 PM
Oops! Nevermind, it's back.

Renn, if you look at the course diagram, fence 3 is angled away a bit. It seems like the riders who make the turn well are jumping it directly perpendicular to the long side (or even turning left a bit), so they're angling the fence itself. Those who take a track perpendicular to the fence seem to have too tight of a left turn and they lose a lot of impulsion to 4.

Plus, those rolltops are spooky and a lot are peeking at it.

Renn/aissance
Oct. 11, 2009, 02:30 PM
Shmon, thanks! I was wondering what the track of choice seemed to be as it does seem from the diagram that slicing fence 3 seems to be a better option. :)

elv21love
Oct. 11, 2009, 03:07 PM
ahh! the live feed just went out again for me :/

Sing Mia Song
Oct. 11, 2009, 03:58 PM
Is the combination really long, or are people just not maintaining pace to 4A? Or are the roll tops backing off the horses that much?

shmon
Oct. 11, 2009, 04:04 PM
Yes :)

elv21love
Oct. 11, 2009, 04:05 PM
the combination is really long haha :)

Sing Mia Song
Oct. 11, 2009, 04:40 PM
Yes :)

Ha! Thanks.

copper1
Oct. 12, 2009, 07:29 AM
I thought the first course was very tough as should be at this level. The turn from 3 to the three combination at 4 required energy off the turn and many riders lost their engine as they made the turn and had the stop. When they reapproached they did the 3 just fine.(probably wanting to kick themselves!)

Release First
Oct. 12, 2009, 11:17 AM
I loved the fact that for the first time in a long time the opening line was not super long and was toward the gate instead of away from the gate. It gave them a real opportunity to get a smooth confident start. The rest of the course was technical and it was fun to watch the stars negotiate it so beautifully.

Of course, I am still so thrilled for Zazou!!!

Release First
Oct. 12, 2009, 11:54 AM
I loved the fact that for the first time in a long time the opening line of the course was not super long and was toward the gate instead of away from the gate. It gave them a real opportunity for the riders to get a smooth confident start. The rest of the course was technical and it was fun to watch the stars negotiate it so beautifully.

Of course, I am still so thrilled for Zazou!!!

mroades
Oct. 12, 2009, 01:04 PM
Agreed, I liked the course. I got to stay and watch the first 150 or so, and I loved Zazous and Jessicas first courses. One of my students gave me further updates by phone as we made the 12 hour drive home with the large pony!

I thought it was a test of pace and track, an how to use both hands and both legs, not a scope test or a trick test. You had to either really stick to your plan, or make it look like plan B was plan A...lol.

Janet
Oct. 12, 2009, 01:59 PM
Those of you who are seeing it: in your opinion, given the trouble with the bending five to the combination, does it make sense to plan to take a more conservative turn and use six strides from 3 to 4A to establish a good stride to the combination? (It seems from the course map and the photo on COTH that four strides, while possible, would be asking for trouble.) Is there a common denominator to the errors at fence 3--the line they use for the turn from 2 to 3?

I saw people "make it work" with each possible line. The difference seemed to be that they were planning ahead (from before the turn to 3) on BOTH the line AND the pace / impulsion. The people who got in trouble were focusing on one and neglecting the other.

tinlizzie
Oct. 12, 2009, 02:42 PM
I just got home after taking two kids (both first timers and their horses were first timers as well) to Harrisburg. I really liked the first course for several reasons: 1) It didn't test your horse, depending on your plan, any horse could jump around it without scoping out and the judges had no set expectations for strides other than the last line. 2) It was a thinking riders course. You went in with a plan and those that could change things up if necessary got around just fine. 3) The kinder, gentler start was a plus. I think they should always give the horses and riders a chance to have a confidence building fence or two, it certainly didn't prevent the rest of the course from separating the wheat from the chaff and at least it gave the greener riders a chance for a good start before the real tests started coming.

As to the specific lines, I told my kids to set up the line from 3 to 4a as a six but then ride whatever came up. As long as you used your eyes it worked well, one kid did a six and one a five and both worked well. I think this was the safest option unless you had a really experienced horse and rider, it gave you more options. The problems came if you set up a track for a five but didn't ride forward enough or your horse spooked etc., or if you didn't use your eyes and either got caught too far out and long in six or fell in and were too short but didn't look soon enough to get the five.

The Two stride caught one of my riders, but it was as much a green horse going "say what?" and doing a neat three as anything else. The other horse rode the track we planned but did different stride in several places (for example from the skinny wall to the swedish we planned six and she did a nice seven, then to the two we planned seven and the six came up well so she did that) and made the standby although she dropped off at the 200 mark. Again you just had to think and feel you horse.

The thing that made me happiest was that we finally seem to have left the "less is more" mindset with regard to strides, you could do what worked for your horse without being penalized. Yay!!!