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Foxdale Farm
Oct. 10, 2009, 04:39 PM
What kind of price do you expect to see on a hunter prospect:

a) not yet under saddle (2 yrs. old)
b) already started under saddle, 60-90 days with a pro (3 yrs. old)

Tall (16.3 - 17hh), quiet, big strided with lots of suspension and daisy cutter trot, registered warmblood, by a fairly well known all-rounder stallion but who is not necessarily billed as a hunter sire, but whose babies are turning out to be great hunters, plenty of chrome, gelding.

I'm not in the hunter world, but I am curious about what people are looking for at these ages and the prices they expect to see. I have consulted a few pros, and they seem to have quite a wide range of answers. Low end - $9,000 to high end - $30,000 for a prospect. What about after one successful show season?

Just wondering what the average A/0 would say, as opposed to the pro.

Thanks!

SquishTheBunny
Oct. 10, 2009, 05:05 PM
I havent looked for a "prospect" in a long time, but when looking for my already showing A/O hunter I found a few like you described...already showing and in the $30-35k range. I would probably expect to pay $10-15k for what you described as an unbroke 2 or 3 year old. A little more for one with some under saddle or line experience.

I had a young hunter prospect once...but as he aged, he showed he would rather be a jumper. Thats the hard thing about the young ones. Even if they have a stellar jump, gorgeous movement and ecxellent breeding, they may be more suited to a different discipline as they grow up.

Underdog
Oct. 10, 2009, 07:04 PM
I have a young prospect, but she's a 4 yo Corlando mare that has been carefully started in multiple disciplines.
I'd price her closer to the $30K range. She's earned a Resere Champ in a local first time out show.
She definitely has the dressage capability and is learning to really carry her self as a true 4 yo.
Got news for you hunter shoppers. Better learn basic dressage. Or pay the pricetag of importing.
But what makes a true horseman in the end?...one that rides the horse for you? Or you ride the horse and learn?

A good 2 yo. IF you don't know how to spot a good prospect...that makes ME ponder.

NeverEnd
Oct. 12, 2009, 10:20 AM
Spinning off of this thread:

Flasy, two year old Welsh, semi-popular stallion, very well-known bloodlines on both sides, 8+ mover, excellent conformation, bomb-proof temperament, will mature to 12.1(ish). Lunges, knows verbal commands, wears bridle without fuss. Has NOT been shown.

"IF" you were to sell in today's market, what would you expect to pay?

huntergirl007
Oct. 12, 2009, 05:54 PM
I just bought exactly what you've described! Except he's four, thoroughbred (although built like a warmblood) and I don't know his breeding. I paid $10,000 - although it was a bit of a barn deal. Said seller said they would take lower because they know my family and know my situation. They were asking $15,000.

LovesHorses
Oct. 12, 2009, 06:00 PM
Neverend- Those types are all over the West Coast for $2500 to $3500. A small that is an 8 mover with no show or under saddle mileage is the hardest of sells.

tisor
Oct. 20, 2009, 05:00 PM
underdog send pics!

Underdog
Oct. 20, 2009, 08:44 PM
Now I'm pissed. ;(
I posted a well thought out reply with pictures to boot...only to get timed out.
Her first show this past July was a low key starter show at Quentin. Perfect venue, perfect day. She was Reserve Champ in green hunter. The show is put on by Cross Key Stables for a local hunter series. Not a big deal, but how she handled herself was huge for her first time.
Total brain = $30k with that jump and movement. But not looking to sell either. ;)

Might be taking her to another local venue in Exeter, Pa called Windswept Stables for another day out for some fun this Sat the 24th. Fun stuff.

Hopefully...I can fire off one picture of me walking her around to get acclimated at Quentin.
Sheesh....

http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b9d938b3127ccec7f2ee47dafd00000040O08EbMWbly2aA9 vPgw/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/

Gry2Yng
Oct. 21, 2009, 02:27 AM
Now I'm pissed. ;(
I posted a well thought out reply with pictures to boot...only to get timed out.
Her first show this past July was a low key starter show at Quentin. Perfect venue, perfect day. She was Reserve Champ in green hunter. The show is put on by Cross Key Stables for a local hunter series. Not a big deal, but how she handled herself was huge for her first time.
Total brain = $30k with that jump and movement. But not looking to sell either. ;)

Might be taking her to another local venue in Exeter, Pa called Windswept Stables for another day out for some fun this Sat the 24th. Fun stuff.

Hopefully...I can fire off one picture of me walking her around to get acclimated at Quentin.
Sheesh....

http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47b9d938b3127ccec7f2ee47dafd00000040O08EbMWbly2aA9 vPgw/cC/f%3D0/ps%3D50/r%3D0/rx%3D720/ry%3D480/


Nice looking mare.

YankeeLawyer
Oct. 21, 2009, 03:14 AM
A 4-year old with show mileage and an unbroke 2-year old are two entirely different propositions. One should expect entirely different pricing.

To answer the a) part of the question, if you are willing to put in the time networking, e-mailing and making phone calls and you are willing to travel anywhere in the US or Canada, I would say the following:

In today's market, our experience is that a budget of 10-13K will afford a serious buyer the opportunity to consider many NICE 2-year old hunter prospects. "NICE" being defined as a registered warmblood, by a well known hunter sire, with ZERO vetting issues, a decent mover, with plenty of scope in the free jump chute and the potential to be competitive at the big shows. "Potential" being the operative word as STB pointed out.

To answer the b) part of the question,

In today's market, our experience is that a budget of 13-16K will afford a serious buyer the opportunity to consider many NICE 3-year old hunter prospects (NICE being defined as above). In that price range, some will have u/s training, but most will not. We typically buy from small breeders who don't have u/s programs, but that is fine with us as we prefer to start them ourselves.

Line mileage is fine, but it doesn't really influence the price this ammie is willing to pay for a performance prospect.

In the past year or so we have have purchased prospects from every time zone in the US and Canada. Pricing and (quality) can really run the gamit so be prepared to do a lot research and some legwork.

I am sure there are deals to be had out there but I and others I know sell weanlings for significantly more than the prices noted above. Someone selling 3 year old well bred and nice WBs at 13K to 16K must surely be selling at a loss.

Ravencrest_Camp
Oct. 21, 2009, 07:52 AM
I am sure there are deals to be had out there but I and others I know sell weanlings for significantly more than the prices noted above. Someone selling 3 year old well bred and nice WBs at 13K to 16K must surely be selling at a loss.

I am really curious, as we have started a small breeding program. What is the profile of your weanling or yearling buyers? What discipline are they buying for?

I would have thought that people buying horses that had no work under saddle were such a small number. That's why we were prepared to hang on to them and start them ourselves.

YankeeLawyer
Oct. 21, 2009, 11:46 AM
I am really curious, as we have started a small breeding program. What is the profile of your weanling or yearling buyers? What discipline are they buying for?

I would have thought that people buying horses that had no work under saddle were such a small number. That's why we were prepared to hang on to them and start them ourselves.

I prefer to hang on to them and start them, first because it makes more sense financially to do so, but also because there is a much greater likelihood the horse will be an appropriate match for its new owner and, having been given a good foundation, will go on to do good things in the show ring. Too many variables impact whether a weanling, once sold, will ever reach its potential.

Regarding our weanlings, in the past I have bred hunters and jumpers and our market was other competitors on the A circuit - trainers and riders. I competed for many years on the circuit and have a number of good friends and clients. Now, our focus is primarily dressage (though we do the occasional H/J horse) and my youngsters are marketed to top ammies and pros for upper level competition. These people usually have their own farm and either are capable of starting the horse themselves or are happy to use one of the trainers we work with regularly.

Prices range in general from 13K to 20K, though there are exceptions at either end depending on quality. Typically a very good weanling would be about 15K. But we are talking weanlings that can hold their own in top company out of mares that were imported as competition horses, not your run-of-the mill broodmares. In addition, some buyers can offer a truly exceptional home in terms of care, commitment, and training. Obviously that is a factor that can impact price as well.

Foxdale Farm
Oct. 22, 2009, 03:59 PM
Again, I am not in the hunter world. But does this one display at least some of the desirable characteristics? The trainer says she has classic hunter movement. She is less than 60 days under saddle, and I realize you don't see her either at the walk or the canter. Assuming the canter was a good gait and she is displaying some natural ability over fences, just curious as to some feedback. Owner/seller says she is incredibly quiet, willing, highly trainable and an overall "gentle soul." She is 3 yrs. old and just started.

http://www.onetruemedia.com/otm_site/view_shared?p=9b908e45c16ae1df969bf6&skin_id=601&utm_source=otm&utm_medium=email.

www.foxdalefarm.us