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mcorbett
Oct. 8, 2009, 03:49 PM
For an OTTB...

1) quick resale
2) olympic/advanced level prospect
3) prelim/one* prospect

I found this guy and am in LOVE!
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2607998720103309036iAysZq

BUT, he's 9. I'm looking for a prospect to take me to prelim/one* (maybe more but not sure?). If the horse doesn't have what it takes, I'll need to sell and I'm wondering if his age might put people off.

thoughts?

just for fun :lol:...I'm looking at these right now.
who would you chose?

1) Timber Gal: 6 yr old mare 16.3
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2491858510103309036gPNGpi
http://www.pedigreequery.com/timber+gal

2) Doc's Option: 9 yr old gelding 17.0
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2607998720103309036iAysZq
http://www.pedigreequery.com/docs+option

3) Chop Shop: 3 yr old colt 16.2
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2789720680103309036gVoxxk
http://www.pedigreequery.com/chop+shop

4) American Cade: 6 yr gelding 16.0
http://pets.webshots.com/album/573133926egzVRl
http://www.pedigreequery.com/american+cade

Kimberlee
Oct. 8, 2009, 03:51 PM
From past experience, I did not start eventing until my mare was 13 years old. We did Novice, then Training, and then a year at Prelim. We schooled some Intermediate stuff, but I wussed out on her, LOL;). She never took a lame step. So, that is my experience with age and the OTTB.

Of course, she was a tough as nails brood that thought that anything deserved to be jumped, LOL:)

Heinz 57
Oct. 8, 2009, 04:22 PM
Of the four, I like Timber Gal and Chop Shop better than the gelding Doc's Option. I don't like the shoulder on the other two, especially not on the 9yo in combination with that wither/neck and long-ish back. I really love the neck on Timber Gal, and the hip/hind end on Chop Shop. Timber Gal is a little long, although proportionately so - she strikes me as more of a hunter-type, and I love her relaxed expression. She reminds me a lot of my mare. Chop Shop is more compact, and his neck is on the shorter, bulkier side (in need of some muscle re-shaping!). I like his shoulder and hip, and at 3 he may still grow. Terrible looking feet, though.

I'd go with the mare, myself, if you're looking for something that you can re-sell quickly if it doesn't turn out to be enough potential/right fit/right discipline for you. She's 6, tall, and pretty in a very classic, feminine TB way. Give her a nice topline and some weight, and she'll be a knockout. If she was closer, I'd be scrounging my pennies!

Hilary
Oct. 8, 2009, 04:29 PM
Doc's Option is the spitting image of my Clancy! So I'm a little biased. :)

However, Clancy didn't begin his eventing career until he was 10 - I got him when he was 12 and moved him to prelim. We never quite made it to the * - he was awfully quirky.

He's built like an eventer - uphill, big wither, he looks like he could gallop all day.

yes, the shoulder could have a little more slope, but he is standing under himself a bit. Go see him.

The others are nice too.

Ajierene
Oct. 8, 2009, 04:34 PM
Looking for a Prelim/one star level type horse to resale, I would think marketing the horse by 10 years old to be ideal.

Lower levels, a horse should be marketed by about 12, especially if you are selling as a packer. People looking for this type are looking for a solid record, preferably in the ribbons, and usually closer to 'middle-age' so they do not have to deal with issues arising from age, either young and obnoxious or to old and needing maintenance as soon as they buy him.

I don't think Doc would be to old to buy now, depending on his temperment. You do not have age to worry about to start jumping and can find out pretty quickly whether or not the horse has the talent for the level you want to do. You can, then adjust your training/riding.

The three year old will definitely have some growing up to do.

The two six year olds may still have 'obnoxious teenager' issues to work through.

BigMick
Oct. 8, 2009, 04:56 PM
Here's one that's for sale on a local website. I think he's a hunk!

If I didn't already have three...

http://www.horsesales.com/jungleprince.htm

TXnGA
Oct. 8, 2009, 05:00 PM
I got my horse when he was 8, and had done 1 bn event. The lady that had him extended trot the entire xc course- I knew he had the movement, and she was too scared to let him gallop.

That spring I did 2 novice's (he won and got third) and then moved him up to training for the fall. The next spring moved him up to prelim and had him there for 3 years and then moved him up to intermediate. Granted, he had a few years rest and became a pastuer ornament after the moveup to intermediate, while I got my job underway...

He is now 18 and still going strong and my trainer is asking me what my plan is and when I want to move him up to advanced. He is still learning everyday new things and getting better with every ride.
Today's horses have years and years ahead of them. We have better technology and methods for keeping horses sound and going. I wouldn't count him out if he has 1/2 decent movement/ jump and a good temperment and no major soundness issues. Heck there are horses that are 20 years going around 4* courses.

Good luck- I think he is very cute. I would consider buying him myself if I was looking. I didn't take a chance to look at the other horses you are looking at. I read that one was a mare- i'm not a mare person!

Beam Me Up
Oct. 8, 2009, 05:03 PM
I've gone round and round on this one too many times in life. Should I get the horse that's calling out to me, or something more resellable (big, quiet, young, gelding).

I've done both, and I think it's just a matter of how loudly the horse is calling out to you, and how you view the purchase. Are you really buying it for yourself, or someone else?

I don't believe that older is bad for eventing (two of my soundest horses had very long race careers) but yes, if he doesn't like eventing and you're selling him next year as a greenish 10 yo, you will get less for him than if we were a greenish 5 yo (but probably still more than you paid for him coming OTT).

Just depends how much of a risk taker you are.

Speedy
Oct. 8, 2009, 06:02 PM
A 9 or 10 year old OTTB is not a prospect (for me anyway). It is a horse that has a failed career that you are looking to restart in a new career - and, if he doesn't work out for you, he will have also proven himself unsuitable for the new career, at least at a certain level. To a potential buyer, that is 2 marks against him, plus age. And, remember, there can be a very big difference from a training standpoint, in terms of what the challenges are, with an older horse that has had a full / different career already, and you cannot assume that if he doesn't work out for you, that he will be willing / able to do lower level eventing either.

I don't see anything wrong with giving him a try yourself if you really love him and are prepared to keep him or find him a very good potentially non-eventing home if he doesn't work out. Same could be true for a younger horse, of course, but I would not simply overlook his age if re-selling him is a must.

denny
Oct. 8, 2009, 06:06 PM
I`m pretty sure that Untouchable was 11 when Ben O`Meara got him off the track, and he went on to become one of the USET`s all time great show jumpers.

Maybe someone who knows for sure can chime in here?

So it can be done, just not the norm.

xcPayge
Oct. 8, 2009, 06:23 PM
The one you're in love with is STUNNING! He has great conformation and his neck is set very high up on his chest. He looks like he would be a good mover based on his uphill build and has a great expression. As far as age goes, it really doesn't matter. It is all based on skill. If he is a good mover and naturally good jumper with a good temperament he could be 5 or 13 and it wouldn't make a difference. It may be harder to train since he could possibly have some bad past training that you have to undo, but i think he looks like a great event prospect. Good luck and have fun! It looks like you have a good guy in your hands.

vineyridge
Oct. 8, 2009, 06:57 PM
Of the ones you've mentioned, Doc's Option calls to me as well. HOWEVER, given the huge number of starts that he has had, a PPE would probably be money well spent, including radiographs of knees and ankles. On the other hand, Jessi P is pimping him, isn't she; and she's honest as the day is long and is on CoTH frequently.

judybigredpony
Oct. 8, 2009, 08:12 PM
If your in the mood for bargains, the DE site for CANTER has Giveaways who are reported to be sound quite a number of them.:yes:

idtogo
Oct. 8, 2009, 08:24 PM
[QUOTE=Speedy;4426762]A 9 or 10 year old OTTB is not a prospect (for me anyway). It is a horse that has a failed career that you are looking to restart in a new career


I wouldn't call this a failed career but a successful and long career at the track . A failed career would be one done at 2years of age.....

often these campaigners are very successful in their next career with amazing heart and work ethics,
( a thorough PPE would be a good idea)

Zephyr
Oct. 8, 2009, 10:24 PM
Here's one that's for sale on a local website. I think he's a hunk!

If I didn't already have three...

http://www.horsesales.com/jungleprince.htm

Someone sent me that one today too... I agree, cute! But I can't quite fork over $2500 for an adoption horse you can't resell if they turn out to be good... but that's just me.

sissyfoo
Oct. 8, 2009, 10:35 PM
Definitely the mare if you are looking for a potential resale. I agree with bearcombs and would LOVE to see her with some weight!!!!!!!

vineyridge
Oct. 8, 2009, 11:00 PM
I`m pretty sure that Untouchable was 11 when Ben O`Meara got him off the track, and he went on to become one of the USET`s all time great show jumpers.

Maybe someone who knows for sure can chime in here?

So it can be done, just not the norm.

According to Dr. Birdsall, Untouchable was born in 1952 and was jumping at the International GP level in 1964. He continued to jump internationally in Nations Cups through 1968. The Show jumping Hall of Fame says he was bought as a jumper in 1962 and started as a green 11 year old jumper and had an undefeated season in 1963.
http://www.showjumpinghalloffame.net/inductees/untouchable.shtml

Kyzteke
Oct. 8, 2009, 11:08 PM
A 9 or 10 year old OTTB is not a prospect (for me anyway). It is a horse that has a failed career that you are looking to restart in a new career

Not necessarily true. If the horse was successful at racing, he is not a horse that has had a "failed" career. If he is 6-7 years old, mostly paid his/her way AND retired sound or even semi-sound, he/she is NOT "failed" -- in fact they are a blooming miracle!

A horse of this age has been tested in the fires -- you know his mind, his outlook, his "permanent" conformation, his ability (to a great degree) -- with a 3 yr.old or even a 4 year old alot of that is still just guesswork.

Kyzteke
Oct. 8, 2009, 11:14 PM
According to Dr. Birdsall, Untouchable was born in 1952 and was jumping at the International GP level in 1964. He continued to jump internationally in Nations Cups through 1968. The Show jumping Hall of Fame says he was bought as a jumper in 1962 and started as a green 11 year old jumper and had an undefeated season in 1963.
http://www.showjumpinghalloffame.net/inductees/untouchable.shtml

So it took him only 2 years of training to go from a race horse to a GP jumper? Good for him! And, far be it from me to disagree with Denny (she says, as she pauses to disagree :winkgrin:)...but I don't think it's that rare at all.

Maybe to go to the International GP level -- let's face it, that's rare for any horse (or rider). But for a 9-12 yr old TB to stay sound, learn new things and compete successfully in eventing/steeple chases/point-to-point? Not THAT rare....

Toadie's mom
Oct. 9, 2009, 12:06 AM
[quote=Speedy;4426762]A 9 or 10 year old OTTB is not a prospect (for me anyway). It is a horse that has a failed career that you are looking to restart in a new career


I wouldn't call this a failed career but a successful and long career at the track . A failed career would be one done at 2years of age.....

often these campaigners are very successful in their next career with amazing heart and work ethics,
( a thorough PPE would be a good idea)

THANKYOU! Will Faudree's 1st upper level horse (I know he went intermediate) was at least 9 (mayber older) b4 he started his eventing career. I restarted a 9 yr old that had run for 6yrs. The only reason he never did above novice was because the girl I sold him to was a timid rider. He had big time potential, but my biggest concern was that he got a well deserved good home.

SkipChange
Oct. 9, 2009, 12:21 AM
Well I don't know about starting a career but FWIW my friend has a 22 yr old OTTB who is still very competitive in the A/O jumpers and still does Grand Prix.

deltawave
Oct. 9, 2009, 08:07 AM
My answer--as usual--"it depends". :D

If the rider has already brought multiple horses along to the upper levels AND the 9yo in question has CLEARLY got what it takes, I think it's a reasonable gamble. But it is a gamble--not all horses have what it takes to do Prelim, let alone the upper levels. And by "doing" Prelim I mean safely, competently and successfully, not a "hide your eyes, here they come" type of trip. ;)

It's so hard to know if that great mover with the catty jump is going to have that "X" factor. IMO the really good trainers can a) identify that right away and/or b) develop it so much more consistently than an amateur (and by this I mean AVERAGE amateur) can.

And I totally agree that a horse that's raced until it's 7 or 8 is HARDLY a "failed" racehorse! If they earn their keep, stay sound and keep racing they are gigantic successes in anyone's barn. The Secretariats are freaks for television--a "good" racehorse is the hard-knocking kind that stays sound, knows its job, and earns a paycheck consistently. :)

vineyridge
Oct. 9, 2009, 08:54 AM
I would never call a nine year old who had made over two hundred thousand dollars in his very long racing career a failed race horse. Doc's Option had 84 starts and was in the money in over half of them. He must be a very tough individual who has a truly competitive spirit. He has an old fashioned pedigree without any of the "fashionable" matings that have led to what we now perceive as fragility.

Just because a TB isn't Gr. 1 stakes quality doesn't mean that s/he doesn't have the mental and physical qualities to do other sports with great success. I would never consider a horse who has worked for his living for six years and survived and prospered a failure.

mcorbett
Oct. 9, 2009, 09:07 AM
Vineyridge,
Doc's Option is 5 phalaris to 28 non-phalaris with several lines to teddy.

Chop Shop is 7:25 with 16 lines to teddy, 11 lines to Man O' War, 5 lines to Blue Larkspur, 6 to Tourbillion, and one each to Ksar, Caro and Eight Thirty.
Wow! He seems to scream sporthorse!

Am I learning?

mcorbett
Oct. 9, 2009, 09:07 AM
Does Chop Shop seem to WB-like heavy to be an UL event prospect? I don't think so but a couple people have mentioned it.

tuppysmom
Oct. 9, 2009, 10:09 AM
Chop Shop would be my pick of this group. He is bred a bit like some that we have. I love his huskier build. He looks sturdy and strong. He could be one that won't break the bank to feed.

I would not be afraid of the older one. We got one with 101 starts at age 10. He went on to event and jumpers, and is still going strong in dressage.

We had another that we got at age 19. After the track, he had been bounced around from pillar to post until he landed here as an angry old man. DD took him to training level that year. He was a lesson horse, for our better riders, to age 28 when we gifted him to a 9 year old girl to trail ride.

DD has one who had 44 starts to 6. He is now going advanced.

Go for the one who's face you want to see every day. Or, if you are like me... take them all home and let the chips fall where they may. I have done this on many more than one occassion. It makes my family nervous when I leave the farm with an empty trailer LOL

Revelations
Oct. 9, 2009, 10:36 AM
Funny, I actually looked at Chop Shop, as a yearling at the sales! I liked him well enough, but was not necessarily in the market for his type at the time. Age doesn't bother me if I am planning to hang on to one. If there is a possibility of resale, I like the greenies no older than 7.

RacetrackReject
Oct. 9, 2009, 10:37 AM
Short trot video of Doc is up =)

http://pets.webshots.com/video/3093942630103309036UpEPRl

Bogie
Oct. 9, 2009, 10:58 AM
I don't have a problem with an older TB with a successful track record. The ones that race that long and retire sound are generally hard as nails.

I bought an 8-year old OTTB mare with 56 starts a few years ago and she was sound with absolutely clean legs. I bought her to play with and flip.

However, she took much longer to sell than I'd anticipated. Partly it was because she turned out to have no talent over fences. She hung her knees and my trainer and I decided she would be better to go to someone who didn't want to jump big solid fences. Partly, I think that it's harder to sell a mare. Mine was similar looking to the one you've shown. 16.2, very elegant typey TB. And finally, I have a job and another horse so it just took me longer to get her to the point where she was really more than a prospect.

I had fun with her and she ended up going to a great home at a good price but it taught me a lesson about making money by training an OTTB. Now I only buy for myself.

Of the ones you've shown, I like Chop Shop the best.


For an OTTB...

1) quick resale
2) olympic/advanced level prospect
3) prelim/one* prospect

I found this guy and am in LOVE!
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2607998720103309036iAysZq

BUT, he's 9. I'm looking for a prospect to take me to prelim/one* (maybe more but not sure?). If the horse doesn't have what it takes, I'll need to sell and I'm wondering if his age might put people off.

thoughts?

just for fun :lol:...I'm looking at these right now.
who would you chose?

1) Timber Gal: 6 yr old mare 16.3
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2491858510103309036gPNGpi
http://www.pedigreequery.com/timber+gal

2) Doc's Option: 9 yr old gelding 17.0
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2607998720103309036iAysZq
http://www.pedigreequery.com/docs+option

3) Chop Shop: 3 yr old colt 16.2
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2789720680103309036gVoxxk
http://www.pedigreequery.com/chop+shop

4) American Cade: 6 yr gelding 16.0
http://pets.webshots.com/album/573133926egzVRl
http://www.pedigreequery.com/american+cade

mcorbett
Oct. 9, 2009, 11:07 AM
bogie,

I have a job and another horse so that's why I've had to be ok with keeping what ever I get for awhile.

It's so good to hear about everyone's experiences!

I'd love feed back on the trot videos of Doc and Timber Gal. What do you look for in a trot? How can you see potential when they are so tight?

Lincoln
Oct. 9, 2009, 11:31 AM
I think you'll know when you try them.

Leighton Farm has an incredibly classy 11 year old Stakes horse who's on his way to being a superb eventer. He's tough, proud, and takes work very seriously. He's not for sale, but is a great example of how a professional horse can take up the challenge of a new job quickly and easily.

We took Lincoln the horse out of a field at 16, where he'd stood for eight years, and he was getting ready to go Prelim by the end of his first season. Scope and heart to burn. Legs cold and tight after every event. Stepped over huge jumps. Temperament was the issue - but that was a known from the beginning - very Bold Ruler. (The rider's input was regarded as optional.) He is now squiring around a retired Rolex mare in a big field - a very happy and satisfied horse. Temperament, as others have said, is non-negotiable - especially for an UL horse where adjustability equals safety.

Take along an experienced horse person, do your due diligence, work with a good trainer and pray a lot (same as we all do). I'm with those that think that excellence in one field frequently translates into excellence in another - and so look for that in people and other animals.

vineyridge
Oct. 9, 2009, 11:37 AM
You're definitely learning.

Tail female family of Doc's Option is same branch of 8-h as Damascus. Chop Shop's female family isn't nearly as nice for jumping. MtDNA is important; and Doc's Option's fuel cells obviously work really well.

All things considered, I still like his pedigree best and his record.

avezan
Oct. 9, 2009, 12:36 PM
Someone sent me that one today too... I agree, cute! But I can't quite fork over $2500 for an adoption horse you can't resell if they turn out to be good... but that's just me.

You can resell the horse. You just can't sell it as a racehorse. I've "adopted" 3 TB's from Kim and all 3 are in new homes. She is really great to work with.

For the OP, I like your taste in horses! I like the one you are in love with. Chop Shop is gorgeous too but his low heels in front make me nervous. Maybe its nothing to worry about, but I worry about him running with his hooves balanced like that.

And for the person who said the horse has a failed race career at age 9, I would say it is just the opposite. He had a very successful career and stayed sound until age 9! Quite an accomplishment. I agree with the person that said a 2 year old OTTB had a failed career. If the 9 year old retired sound, then he has a good chance of staying sound.

As far as resale, you have a shorter window with the 9 year old. If he has a good personality and you can get him going soon, I wouldn't worry about it. If it is going to take a lot of work, then start with something younger.

sisu27
Oct. 13, 2009, 10:21 AM
I needed to read this thread. My thbd raced until he was 7 and was retired sound and then did not much worth speaking of for 3 years and then I bought him. He is now 12 and will be going eventing next season.

Even my own coach refers to him as "old" and it gets me down sometimes because I worry that we will run out of time before we get to have all the fun I have planned for us.

scubed
Oct. 13, 2009, 10:33 AM
The advantage of the older horses is that they are mentally grown up. If they are sane and sound after time on the track, I think it is hard to do better. I got my former guy off the track at age 7 (of course, he was a failure, raced 8 times and then was a pony horse), but we did our (mutual) first preliminary 14 months after I got him. I wouldn't move nearly this fast with a 4 or 5 year old off the track. I sold him at age 12 to a junior who rode him through the CCI* (did the CCI when he was 14). She then sold him to a 10 year old (when he was 15). He is now 17 (almost 18), still super sound and packing the kid around the training level.

Speedy
Oct. 13, 2009, 10:59 AM
I don't disagree at all with the posters who say that this may be a great horse. He may well be. And there will be a lot of folks who will have had great experiences in bringing one just like this along.

But, this does not appear to be a situation where the rider will have the luxury (or even the inclination) to keep this horse if it doesn't work out - which, unfortunately, is a real possibility with any horse that hasn't done the desired job yet.

In this case, the horse has had a very long and, yes, successful, racing career - in that the horse is still presumably sound. To many people outside of eventing (in fact, even within eventing these days), that is not a selling point for a number of reasons. And, if the horse doesn't work out as an eventer, and the poster has to sell the horse, this narrows the field of potential buyers. And, anyone who has tried to sell a horse in the current market knows that the market isn't great to begin with and may not be again for some time - particularly in the lower dollar range (in our area, folks are still looking at upper bracket horses, but the lower dollar horses are more difficult to move). So - if resale must be a viable option, this isn't the best prospect - there are tons of other horses at the track and at rescues that are more likely to meet the posters needs - and who also need a good home and a chance at another life. It may (I pray that it does) go to a wonderful home with someone who brings it up the levels, but this particular poster would be taking a bigger risk with this horse than someone who does not have to resell him if it doesn't work out.

eloquence09
Oct. 13, 2009, 02:41 PM
I say you can't beat a TB who has a long career at the track and retires sound and sane. My first event horse ran until he was 7, had 64 starts, and was sound as a dollar. I PC'd on him and took him up through Prelim and other than a minor quarter crack the last summer I had him he never took a lame step. He's almost 16 now and as far as I know he's still going strong packing his AA owner around Novice. Best horse ever. I wouldn't rule out a prospect on the basis of age, especially if your goal is somewhere in the Prelim neighborhood. If they're sound and sane and have a decent rider in the tack it doesn't take long to get moving up the levels, especially with a mature horse.

This is just my opinion from experience, I am not commenting specifically on any of the horses posted here.

glfprncs
Oct. 13, 2009, 06:54 PM
If I recall correctly, when Stephanie Schmidt found her Advanced horse, Capital Hill, he was racing at 7 or 8. She then took him through the Advanced Level. "Truman" as he is known, is still successfully competing at the preliminary level with his current owner/rider.

QHEventr
Oct. 13, 2009, 08:31 PM
My advanced horse, "Northlight" (Diamond) was 7 when we found him down in FL. He ran 26 times, never won, lots of 2nd and 3rds. He was running at the upper levels within 2 years. He was an amazing event horse, and the ultimate LF horse. He double medaled at YR's CCI** LF, and was very competitive at Advanced.

I purchased "Mariatom" (Thomas) off of the CANTER PA trainer listings last fall......he was 14 and had 144 starts and 275k in earnings. He ran his first baby HT a month after he arrived, and finished on his dressage score! He's a brilliant mover and jumper, and I would have loved to have found him when he was 7 or 8.....even 10! He'll bop around with me, maybe get to do a T3D, and then hopefully teach students the ropes. The best thing about him is how easy he is under saddle. He acted like the ultimate professional at his eventing debut!

The track veterans tend to be very sensible, and know their job....they tend to transition very easily into new careers.

If I were buying for me, I wouldn't put an age limit on one that I really liked. If I were buying for resale, I would probably not buy over the age of 10, unless the horse was a superstar

Johanna

CoolMeadows
Oct. 13, 2009, 08:52 PM
I like Docs Option and agree that his career was far from a failure but you have to consider your goals. When I buy to resell I buy young geldings with limited starts as that's what the majority are looking for. For myself, a warhorse with many years on the track usually means a well tended, tough, intelligent competitor. I like Docs length of cannon bone, his neck, smart eye and clean shoulder and neck. I didn't look at the others except for Chop Shop who I don't like as much as a jumper prospect. For me, his negatives are his muttony shoulder, tight chin, average expression, weak gaskin, relatively long cannons all the way around in relation to his overall build, and difficult neck (which is not always a big deal on an OTTb)... but still, if I had to put money on which one will be the more free mover, good thinker, and athletic jumper, it would be on Doc. For me, one of the biggest factors whether I buy for myself or to resell is the expression and whether I want to see that horse every day. Even if your intention is to resell, having to work with and bring along a horse that you don't enjoy is no walk in the park. It's easier to rehome one that you've really loved working with, although it can be rough sending them off!

ddashaq
Oct. 13, 2009, 10:04 PM
[quote=Speedy;4426762]A 9 or 10 year old OTTB is not a prospect (for me anyway). It is a horse that has a failed career that you are looking to restart in a new career


I wouldn't call this a failed career but a successful and long career at the track . A failed career would be one done at 2years of age.....

often these campaigners are very successful in their next career with amazing heart and work ethics,
( a thorough PPE would be a good idea)

I agree. My TB was 9 when I got him and he had raced 19 times, retiring at 6 when his owner fell ill. He placed top three 11 times which I would hardly call a failed career. Restarting him has been a blast as he is incredibly willing and able. We started jumping two weeks ago and will be trying a h/j schooling show next month. He has one of the best minds I have ever dealt with and just has a wonderful attitude. I love him to bits and would take on another OTTB of any age again in a heart beat.:)

BigMick
Oct. 14, 2009, 09:26 PM
Someone sent me that one today too... I agree, cute! But I can't quite fork over $2500 for an adoption horse you can't resell if they turn out to be good... but that's just me.

Well, I just bought a horse that had been bought through this site two years ago! So, I think re-sale is allowed.