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ponyglamorama
Oct. 6, 2009, 10:55 PM
O.k.....I am a novice pony mom. How much should one expect to spend on a lease for a competitive small pony hunter? How much should one plan on paying for commissions, insurance, shipping, etc,? Does the one trying pay for shipping? Does one typically pay for insurance while trying? HELP!!!:confused:

Sugarbrook
Oct. 6, 2009, 11:02 PM
Your trainer should handle that for you. She (or He) will know and advise you.

ponyglamorama
Oct. 6, 2009, 11:07 PM
great...but i'd like to be a little bit knowledgable too...or i wouldn't have asked.

MHM
Oct. 6, 2009, 11:25 PM
Generally, if you take an animal on trial, you are responsible for all costs associated with it leaving the property where it lives. That would include shipping, board while you try it, any additional insurance needed, and any vet or farrier bills it incurs while you have it.

If you lease it, you would pay a lease fee plus all the bills on it while you have it. You should discuss the commission with your trainer before you shop.

Welcome to the BB, and good luck! :)

spmoonie
Oct. 6, 2009, 11:31 PM
In general, a lease is 1/3 the purchase price of the horse/pony and commision for the trainer is 10%.

How fancy are you talking about? Pony finals winner or just competitive?

ponyglamorama
Oct. 6, 2009, 11:36 PM
thank you so much! say your lease is 20-30....what would one expect to pay in commisions, and is it always expected that one pays insurance? or is that included sometimes... just wondering ? thanks

quicksilverponies
Oct. 6, 2009, 11:40 PM
Commission is usually 10%. Insurance would probably be your responsibility. The overall lease depends on the quality and level of experience of the pony. If it is a younger pony needing show miles - you might not be expected to provide as much. If it is a high quality, been there, done that type of pony, you will be expected to pay insurance, shipping, commission and all expenses.

Sugarbrook
Oct. 6, 2009, 11:41 PM
Commission still 10% I would say, unless your own trainer did the entire deal with a pony (say, maybe in your barn) and it could be a bit less.

Insurance. you pay.

Sounds like with the lease price this pony must be a really good pony and has points on USEF in the top 10 or 20.

spmoonie
Oct. 6, 2009, 11:41 PM
thank you so much! say your lease is 20-30....what would one expect to pay in commisions, and is it always expected that one pays insurance? or is that included sometimes... just wondering ? thanks

I honestly dont have any experience leasing a pony this expensive, however, If it were me, I would have insurance on it! I would not want to be the one responsible for reimbursement if that 90,000 dollar pony (God forbid!) has some terrible accident and is deemed pasture ornament.

Sugarbrook
Oct. 6, 2009, 11:44 PM
OH no no no, that pony is not a 30k pony, that is what the lease price is. So I am thinking 3 times or more than that. So, thats the insurance you would pay. But , if the pony is older, the insurance, if the company will still insure it, would be quite a bit.

ponyglamorama
Oct. 6, 2009, 11:45 PM
so...for a been there done that....i pay everything. so a 30, 000 lease i should plan to add another 5 or so? rather ask now, so i am prepared! thx

spmoonie
Oct. 6, 2009, 11:50 PM
OH no no no, that pony is not a 30k pony, that is what the lease price is. So I am thinking 3 times or more than that. So, thats the insurance you would pay. But , if the pony is older, the insurance, if the company will still insure it, would be quite a bit.

Thats what I was thinking....just not what I typed! :winkgrin::lol: I meant 90,000. haha

ponyglamorama
Oct. 7, 2009, 12:08 AM
what iyo, are the most important things to look for in a good small?

quicksilverponies
Oct. 7, 2009, 12:15 AM
For the price you are looking at, the pony should be top of the line in size, be a great mover, be brave and steady to the jumps, jump very well, have an auto lead change and be able to model. Being super quiet is also a big plus, but sometimes some of the really fancy smalls are not always the easiest to ride. The pony should have a substantial show record at AA shows. It really depends on what type of rider your child is as well.

ponyglamorama
Oct. 7, 2009, 12:23 AM
wow....i was beginning to think that i should expect a pretty average pony. i really hope you are right!

Kikki
Oct. 7, 2009, 12:24 AM
I see a lot of lease commissions at 20%, sometimes 15% (which is the general commssion fee you will see on purchases). Really competitive ponies of all sizes can get well in to the 6 figures, and there are a lot of fancy ponies that are NEVER for sale, only for lease. There are good ponies that easily lease for $75,000/yr or more. When you have it on trial, you will most likely have to pay all its expenses related to transportation, board, medications potentially, shoeing, insurance.

There are a lot of ponies available for lease that are competitive enough but not proven finals/indoors winners for 20-30 (sometimes a little less). What you should expect in the pony is a little dependent on the kid you are trying to mount. If the kid is a pretty slick rider, you can find something very fancy but a little quirky to ride, or if the kid is needing something simple, you might find one that is a great packer in the rated division, but might not move as well at the ultra fancy model or it might have a minor conformation flaw (like a splint). But in general these ponies should move well, jump well, swap its leads, have a nice fluid canter, not have a dirty stop, and should not have a huge flaw that would get it killed in the model.

ponyglamorama
Oct. 7, 2009, 12:29 AM
that is just fabulous information. thank you!

ponyglamorama
Oct. 7, 2009, 12:50 AM
so what i have gathered from this is.....plan on paying for everything.

MHM
Oct. 7, 2009, 12:59 AM
so what i have gathered from this is.....plan on paying for everything.

Correct. It's like you own the animal, except when your lease is up, you just return it, you don't have to worry about selling it.

Also, you pay the shipping to return it to the owner at the end of the trial or lease. It doesn't just magically disappear the day your lease ends. ;)

FrenchFrytheEqHorse
Oct. 7, 2009, 01:22 PM
Think about it like you would think about leasing a car- the car is yours, you pay all upkeep, insurance, costs associated therewith, etc.

Also, you will be expected to return the pony in a certain condition (of course, normal wear and tear is acceptable).

Depending on the lease, there might be stipulations as to how many shows you can/must attend and where. Some of the bigger name ponies might require in the lease contract that you show in florida during the winter, or go to pony finals, etc. This should be discussed and agreed upon before signing anything.