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View Full Version : Pro's and con's of this lease....



JackSprats Mom
Oct. 5, 2009, 11:13 PM
So at the moment this is all theoretical but I want to know if I'm crazy or not...

Saw an ad looking for a half lease for a dressage rider taking lessons from an FEI trainer 3 times a week and wants something to lease for constant progression....obviously I have a ton of questions for her about the barn her riding who the trainer is etc..

Not sure how serious I am about this but part of me is thinking this could be a win/win...the horse gets training at no real cost to me, leaser gets a decent (but difficult) horse.

My biggest issue is my guy is a confident opinionated horse who can't be 'muscled' into things else its just a fight..my worry is that it could go rapidly downhill and set him back a year....

So who would look into it, who would just pass and why?

slc2
Oct. 6, 2009, 03:22 AM
Sounds like hell and a basket of kittens.

goeslikestink
Oct. 6, 2009, 03:30 AM
you will end up paying for all of the horse - whilse person gets all the fun

look here http://www.bhs.org.uk/Horse_Care/Horse_Care_Advice/Publications/~/media/BHSMain/Horse%20Care/Publication%20PDFs/Loaning%20or%20Leasing%20a%20Horse%20or%20Pony.ash x


my point is its sound attractive but is it- your expected to pay half i have seen all tofoten how the other loans or leases go wrong and the horse is the one that suffers

its just another way of getting a horse without having to pay for it but could be at te same time ruin the horse
you need to think long and add up the pro and cons with an unknown person let alone someone you know

if they had an accident for exsample that could eefect your home - so be wise

meupatdoes
Oct. 6, 2009, 04:35 AM
If said FEI rider will do all of this 3 times per week riding at your place with her instructor coming to your place, then you are off to a start. She pays half of all your horse's expenses, with a deposit for one month's half board in advance, and then handles lessons with her trainer separately.

AnotherRound
Oct. 6, 2009, 12:42 PM
That's what I would do, and only that.

ginger708
Oct. 6, 2009, 02:50 PM
This sounds somewhat similar to what I'm doing now. I had to retire my horse due to injury and can not afford to purchase what I want for a horse right now. So instead of my progress stopping because I had no horse to ride I started to look for a horse to share board. It sound the same as a half lease but no contract. The horse I found was a A-circuit hunter that the owner no longer wanted to jump. So the owner needed a dressage rider and I needed a horse to ride. It has worked out really well. I pay half of the board, farrier and and show expenses. I ride three days that will go up to four during show season. One of my three days I ride with my trainer. The owner has met and ridden with my trainer that was one of the stipulations before I decided to enter in the agreement. I have found with share boarding that as the share-border it is good to be as generous as you can be, you have to remember that you have been entrusted with someone's horse.

Speedy
Oct. 6, 2009, 02:53 PM
I like to say that I can ruin my own horse just fine on my own - I don't need someone else's help to do it! So, for me, leasing isn't an option even with an FEI trainer.

ginger708
Oct. 6, 2009, 03:21 PM
I like to say that I can ruin my own horse just fine on my own - I don't need someone else's help to do it! So, for me, leasing isn't an option even with an FEI trainer.

I think that is a very narrow point of view.

For my situation I have a more experienced seat and hands than the owner of the horse. She is working on dressage as well, but has just started to work with a dressage trainer.

So instead of having to deal with all of the ups and downs of training a green to dressage horse and being a beginner dressage rider the horse is working on stuff beyond what she is learning. So during her rides when she is asking for connection and leg yields, it's not complicated for the horse because the horse knows the correct aids for that. Because the horse is now learning shoulder-in, turn on the haunches, and collecting his canter.

I'm not saying to take the first person with a check but there are good riders out there that need horses to ride for whatever reason. I found the horse that I am working with through friends and I was recommended to the horses owner by borders at her barn.

mbm
Oct. 7, 2009, 12:29 PM
i think the answer is: it depen ds... on a lot. who is the trainer? who is the rider? where would the horse live? going to shows? etc etc.

i have in the past leased my old fei horse to another rider, allowed people to take lessons on said horse, etc etc..... this was very beneficial at that time..... it helped pay his way and lots of folks got use of him and he was no worse for it (better off actually because he got worked when i was too sick to ride)...

anyway, it all really depends. before even thinking about the $$ aspect you need to find out the who/what/where part. if all that is good then think about the $$ aspect. if the rider will keep the horse at another barn who will pay the remaining 50% of expenses?

if you decide to go forward, get a contract that lists all things you expect, get a deposit and have the lessor insure the horse for medical/etc....

FancyFree
Oct. 7, 2009, 01:05 PM
I think that is a very narrow point of view.

For my situation I have a more experienced seat and hands than the owner of the horse. She is working on dressage as well, but has just started to work with a dressage trainer.

So instead of having to deal with all of the ups and downs of training a green to dressage horse and being a beginner dressage rider the horse is working on stuff beyond what she is learning. So during her rides when she is asking for connection and leg yields, it's not complicated for the horse because the horse knows the correct aids for that. Because the horse is now learning shoulder-in, turn on the haunches, and collecting his canter.

I'm not saying to take the first person with a check but there are good riders out there that need horses to ride for whatever reason. I found the horse that I am working with through friends and I was recommended to the horses owner by borders at her barn.

I agree. A lease can be very beneficial to both parties. As long as you're very careful with who you lease to/from and have terms clearly spelled out, it can be a good experience.

I leased from a woman and did not cover every base. We ended up discontinuing the lease when I discovered that three other riders were riding the horse. This horse was exhausted! So live and learn. You can always tweak the terms later if the person is flexible.

KayBee
Oct. 7, 2009, 05:52 PM
I leased from a woman and did not cover every base. We ended up discontinuing the lease when I discovered that three other riders were riding the horse. This horse was exhausted! So live and learn.

I half-lease and my lease stipulates that I let no one else ride the horse. I assumed it was about liability (and it probably is, for the most part). Never occurred to me to throw up all my friends and relations on his back, and have them pay for the privilege. Yowza.

yaya
Oct. 7, 2009, 06:57 PM
I just finished leasing my horse out to a new student of my trainer's. He had been out of work for over two years, and it was a great way to get him back into work and let a dressage newbie try out a schoolmaster, all under the watchful eyes of my trainer. (And no cost to me!)

I have him back now, no worse for wear - in fact, he's better than when I stopped riding him. He feels just like when I bought him 8 years ago. (Shows me how much I dampened down his gaits before - won't do that again!) And having ridden another horse in the interim, I have advanced my riding to now be able to take advantage of all his GP moves (yep, he remembers them!)

I knew other people would be riding him as well (my trainer likes to let her students feel other horses), and just put in the lease that all riders had to be approved in advance by my trainer. Several people did their very first tempi changes on him, so he ended up teaching more than just the lessee!

The key here for it all to work out so well, is that it was done at my trainer's barn, not with someone I didn't know.

JackSprats Mom
Oct. 7, 2009, 11:20 PM
Thanks guys, alot of food for thought.

I've been chatting with the girl on line and am still getting more information, not sure this would be a good deal to her as I think my horse may take advantage of her..She is riding in a clinic at that barn next week so i think I'll go watch.