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jmvwiv
Oct. 5, 2009, 09:32 AM
I am changing barns, is there any proper “etiquette” in doing so?

TrakeGirl
Oct. 5, 2009, 09:53 AM
Not sure what kind of situation you are in - but I always prefer to talk to the barn owner in person first and just be as kind, up front and and honest as possible.

Then I provide them with a written copy of my 30 day notice for records/legal reasons if you have a boarding contract that requires that kind of notice. I keep it short and simple - and complimentary if possible. Always try to leave on a good note if the situation warrants that possibility.

magnolia73
Oct. 5, 2009, 10:31 AM
Give your notice as per your contract. Come up with a gracious reason. Not "you suck", but "new barn better meets my needs, but I enjoyed my time here". If other boarders ask, be gracious- "new barn is closer to home, has more turn out, works better for me".

Don't be nasty, snotty, rude or try to get out of your contractual obligation. If it is an awful situation, pay what you need to pay, and move "Oh, well, they had an opening today so I leave tomorrow, but here is my 30 day board check since I don't want to put you in a bad spot".

jmvwiv
Oct. 5, 2009, 11:49 AM
I dont have a contract and would like to leave pretty quickly after I have the talk (I'm thinking maybe doing it tomorrow), and I dont want to pay for more than the prorated board for the days that I am there. Is that bad?

Under no circumstances would I be unprofessional or rude during the conversation, no worries there.

bizbachfan
Oct. 5, 2009, 11:52 AM
even without a contract 30 days notice is common courtesy. Do you know if there is a waiting list to board there? If so might not cause undue hardship to not give 30 days notice but if BO has to find a new boarder to replace you and has no warning it could be an issue.

ponies123
Oct. 5, 2009, 11:55 AM
Well it is standard in the industry (and most others) to give 30 days notice, but if you have no boarding contract than you are under no legal obligation to give any notice at all, your b/o might be pissed off though. If it's a bad situation and there is an open stall waiting for you to move into immediately, you may not care if (s)he is bad about you moving without notice. However if you have to stay at the barn for any length of time, are worried about horses safety, etc. I would give proper notice and/or payment. The best advice I've gotten about the horse world is that it's small and you really should try not to burn any bridges.

magnolia73
Oct. 5, 2009, 11:57 AM
If they have never agreed to provide pro-rated board, you may be stuck.

Coreene
Oct. 5, 2009, 11:59 AM
Wanting to bail with no notice and not paying beyond that day in a thread with "proper etiquette" in the title - now there's a nice contradiction. Take the high road and pay a 30 day notice period, even if you leave immediately.

meupatdoes
Oct. 5, 2009, 12:15 PM
I dont have a contract and would like to leave pretty quickly after I have the talk (I'm thinking maybe doing it tomorrow), and I dont want to pay for more than the prorated board for the days that I am there. Is that bad?

Under no circumstances would I be unprofessional or rude during the conversation, no worries there.

Uh, unless there is some crazy drama situation requiring you to up and leave immediately, leaving on one day's notice and then asking for pro-rated board back is really no bueno.

At the very least leave them with the money through the end of the month, if there isn't a contract requiring you to pay next month's board as well.

findeight
Oct. 5, 2009, 12:54 PM
If it's a bad situation? You leave a check for the 30 days and MOVE ASAP.

With no contract? I dunno-it is reasonable and customary in most month to month trenancies (which is what you basically have with no contract) to pay thru the end of the month in which you leave if not go with the 30 days.

If you want to be ethical and fair, pay up thru the 31st of October. But MOVE the horse as soon as you give that notice if there is any hint of bad blood or retribution.

BTW you owe no explanation other then you are leaving.

Contracts really, really, should be in place for this to protect both sides. It may be you can move without 30 days notice but it also makes no promises on what care the horse gets. Can hardly claim breach of contract for poor horse care when there is no contract.

Please do not forget that the horse world is a small one. Unless this barn is just gosh awful and the BO a well known stoner/deadbeat-your reputation as a skipper might get around quicker then you do.

jmvwiv
Oct. 5, 2009, 01:52 PM
Wanting to bail with no notice and not paying beyond that day in a thread with "proper etiquette" in the title - now there's a nice contradiction. Take the high road and pay a 30 day notice period, even if you leave immediately.

Wanting to do something one way and doing it are 2 different things thus the question as to the "norms"/etiquette.

If that is what one should do then so be it. Doesnt mean I have to like it. :)

I was hoping notification tomorrow, move horse this weekend and pay through the 15th would be sufficient.

used2
Oct. 5, 2009, 02:04 PM
Look to your contract if you have one. It isn't uncommon for barns to charge a "daily fee" that is higher than your monthly board divided by 30 days for your last month (and in some cases the first month).

Make sure all debts are settled with BO and anyone else before you load up. I've found that face to face with a written notice is best. Never ever say anything negative about the place you are leaving.

findeight
Oct. 5, 2009, 02:06 PM
I was hoping notification tomorrow, move horse this weekend and pay through the 15th would be sufficient.

And you can certainly offer to do just that when you give notice.

But they will probably say no and want the 30 days...and in that case I would probably counter with the rest of this month and figure out the the pro rated rate by day and pay thru the 31st. Be aware they will probably NOT let you off the property until you pay and are within their rights in most states to do so.
Depending on your states laws, if this is considered a month to month tenency, they will be on the side of the BO with at least until the end of this month. That 30 day thing is reasonable and customary contract or not.

Only thing that might help is if they can fill the stall immmediately so they are not looking at an empty stall the rest of this month.

tuckawayfarm
Oct. 5, 2009, 02:14 PM
I was hoping notification tomorrow, move horse this weekend and pay through the 15th would be sufficient.

Well since this was posted after Oct. 1st, I'm assuming your October board has already been paid. If you are offering to cover through Nov. 15th, it's very possible that the BO will be OK, especially if you have been polite and upfront.

If I'm wrong and you still owe for October, do the right thing and pay at least the full 30 days from notice. Most barns want notice by the 1st or will expect 30 days paid for the following month, ie: end of November.

SkipChange
Oct. 5, 2009, 02:27 PM
I left a boarding facility with only 1 day notice this summer. But it was an entirely different situation in that it was a short-term board and the farm knew up front that I would only be there for 3 months. There were some serious care issues (let's just say horse went from 52" girth to 48") and I was concerned for the health/safety of my horse so I packed everything up and politely told the trainer I was leaving early. Didn't really give her much of a reason and she didn't really need one. I paid for the 2 weeks we weren't there anyway--I felt it was only fair.

I would recommend you ask the BO if you can just pay through the 15th like you said. If she says no pay the 30 days and simply be happy to be moving on to a better place.

BAC
Oct. 5, 2009, 02:29 PM
I was hoping notification tomorrow, move horse this weekend and pay through the 15th would be sufficient.

Not sufficient if you really care about "proper etiquette" - 30 days notice is only fair.

findeight
Oct. 5, 2009, 02:30 PM
Well since this was posted after Oct. 1st, I'm assuming your October board has already been paid. If you are offering to cover through Nov. 15th, it's very possible that the BO will be OK, especially if you have been polite and upfront.

If I'm wrong and you still owe for October, do the right thing and pay at least the full 30 days from notice. Most barns want notice by the 1st or will expect 30 days paid for the following month, ie: end of November.

Ummm, with no contract, I believe 30 days from notification would be sufficient and hold up. And if OP is paid up in full for October? Then, yeah, there should be little issue, just the few days at the beginning of next month.

And insist on a contract at the next place so you don't have to guess.

tuckawayfarm
Oct. 5, 2009, 02:37 PM
I agree that 30 days would cover it. Just pointing out that most moves occur at the end of the month, so unless something comes up unexpectedly, notice should be given with board on the first. Makes it much easier for the BO to replace you without losing on board. The horse world is small and many boarding barns run on a tight budget these days. Making it easier on everyone will help insure you a good reputation and warm welcome at future barns. :)

englishivy
Oct. 5, 2009, 03:38 PM
You needing to give notice is absolutely necessary if you want to reamin kosher. Unfortunately, most farms (especially in this economy) are living paycheck to paycheck. So if you just bail without any notice, you really put them in a tight spot. I always say that I am never mad about a client leaving my program....it's the way they leave that determines if we are friendly at shows or not. :no:

If a BO knows that income isn't going to be there next month (because of your fabulous 30 days notice;)), they can make changes to their budget accordingly. Or best situation, they can tell those on their waiting list about an opening, and in turn the upcoming clients can give notice to their present farms.

Whether or not you stay during that period is entirely up to you. I've eaten board at one place while my horses were at another b/c I just wanted the heck out...without causing a scene. In fact, I think BOs like that situation best: you are gone, but your financial contribution stays. :lol:

But it's your bridge to burn....

TrakeGirl
Oct. 5, 2009, 04:21 PM
I just changed barns.

I really liked my old barn, but the turnout situation wasn't working so a few days into September, I took my horse to my trainer's barn for a trial boarding situation to see how I would like it there. I didn't want to leave current barn without knowing I would like new barn. I was completely honest with my current barn owner about what I was doing and she was cool with it - no hard feelings. By mid-Sept, I had made up my mind that I was going to stay at my trainer's, so I let her know. However - as most people have mentioned and as my boarding contract states – I am required to give 30 days notice from the beginning of a boarding cycle (first of the month). So I verbally told her mid-September that we wouldn’t be coming back...and my horse had been gone since almost the beginning of September...but I still paid October board and provided her an official 30 day written notice on Oct 1. Technically – she got almost 2 months of board out of me without me having my horse there at all. But that was my choice. And she is nice enough that she said she’ll refund me prorated days if she finds another boarder before the end of Oct to fill my stall since really...she got about six weeks of notice.

But we are on good terms and I like this barn A LOT – I wanted to keep relations good in case I needed to go back there or send another horse there.

So it is probably more about how you want to end things.

SuperSTB
Oct. 5, 2009, 04:31 PM
30 days notice plus paid board is standard common courtesy.

Not burning a bridge is worth that board money- trust me on this one. You're keeping a "barn option" around if you've left on good terms and that could be HUGE insurance if anything crops up later on down the road.

Oldenburg99
Oct. 5, 2009, 04:45 PM
30 days notice plus paid board is standard common courtesy.

Not burning a bridge is worth that board money- trust me on this one. You're keeping a "barn option" around if you've left on good terms and that could be HUGE insurance if anything crops up later on down the road.

I completely agree, Super. Burning a bridge and getting a bad reputation is not worth it in the horse community. I wouldnt want the rumor to start that I'm a bad boarder you wouldnt want in your barn. We ALL know horse people talk. I moved over the summer and had a great relationship with my barn manager at a wonderful farm and I think I gave them 60 days notice. I know I will always have a open invitation to move back if I ever needed to and that's worth its weight in gold. And that's because I was honest and courteous.

EmJae
Oct. 5, 2009, 05:41 PM
Without a contract you are not legally required to give notice at all. That said, the horse world is smaller than it looks, and as someone said above, you don't want to burn any bridges. Word, especially gossip, travels at phenomenally fast speeds, so you don't want it getting around to other people that you are a difficult boarder. Even if this is not true, once it's said, it can linger on your reputation for a while. Two weeks notice is pretty short, and if there are no replacement boarders readily available, your barn owner might feel a bit sour about that. Personally, unless its an intolerable situation, then I would give 30 days notice.

I just moved my horse within the past two weeks because my horse was being fed inadequately. Although I had a contract requiring 30 days notice, I could have legally left since the barn was not living up to their end of the bargain by creating an unhealthy situation for my horse since he was becoming sickly looking. However, I gave the barn 30 days notice and paid through those 30 days, and just kept on top of the feeding situation. We left a few days before the 30 days were off and I just ate that cost.

You don't have to provide the barn owners an explanation why you're moving, and unless you've been 100% happy there, I wouldn't just in case some legal situation may arise.

suze
Oct. 5, 2009, 06:11 PM
Pay for the 30 days even if you take your horse tomorrow. Common courtesy and you don't want bad vibes following you.

AlterEgoME
Oct. 5, 2009, 09:40 PM
Kills me how we have to be courteous to the BO but they don't have to do any thing to respect the boarder. Kick the client out with less than 24 hours notice but they get 30 days of board.

I have always done the proper thing, but it chaps my butt when I am leaving because my horse is not getting the care or training that the contract says it should and I have no recourse but to lose 30 days board because the BO has lost her job/found a new husband/decided to breed walking horses etc.

Or the trainer packs up and leaves due to a dispute with the BO. I have even had one barn go Natural Horsemanship because the BO had an epiphany, fired the trainer and I had to stay for 30 days. Oh and then there was the time all the help quit and stalls did not get cleaned until 2pm every day.

Carry on, just saying.

Roxy SM
Oct. 5, 2009, 10:15 PM
Kills me how we have to be courteous to the BO but they don't have to do any thing to respect the boarder. Kick the client out with less than 24 hours notice but they get 30 days of board.

I have always done the proper thing, but it chaps my butt when I am leaving because my horse is not getting the care or training that the contract says it should and I have no recourse but to lose 30 days board because the BO has lost her job/found a new husband/decided to breed walking horses etc.

Or the trainer packs up and leaves due to a dispute with the BO. I have even had one barn go Natural Horsemanship because the BO had an epiphany, fired the trainer and I had to stay for 30 days. Oh and then there was the time all the help quit and stalls did not get cleaned until 2pm every day.

Carry on, just saying.

I thought you didn't have to pay the 30 days if they aren't holding up their end of the deal, such as the care or training the contract says it should as you mentioned.

tBHj
Oct. 5, 2009, 10:32 PM
I thought you didn't have to pay the 30 days if they aren't holding up their end of the deal, such as the care or training the contract says it should as you mentioned.

This is what I thought too.

gottagrey
Oct. 5, 2009, 11:47 PM
She doesn't have a contract so there is no provision or reason to discuss prorating board. However, 30 days is customary - as some of the other posters mentioned - if you have paid for October - then give notice as soon as possible and leave this weekend - ask for any outstanding balances in addition to board (lessons etc) and pay those up in full also (you might want to write on check PAID IN FULL - as that statement in a memo can help you in case there are any problems) I would also suggest you ask your new barn if they will prorate October's board since you will be there only for 2 weeks - so Full board at old barn; 1/2 or prorated at new barn (+ whatever security deposit they might require) Which reminds me - some barns do require a security deposit (which they can keep in lieu of 30 days notice) so if that's the case you can bail at any time.

NOW if there is a situation where your horse is not being taken care of properly and I mean really not taken care of properly - like barn running out of hay/grain/shavings - serious stuff - not petty issues; then leave and don't look back.

Also agree w/ the less said the better.

AlterEgoME
Oct. 5, 2009, 11:54 PM
In my case, the BO has usually had a deposit equal to one months board, so you walk away from the deposit, cause they weren't giving it back and I sure wasn't going to court over the 800-1500 depending.

In the case of the stall cleaning, I left and ate the deposit. When the hunter trainer quit and they natural horsemanship trainer was brought in, I stuck it out, but I was none too happy. Truly, I came back from vacation and the BO and the trainer were fighting over who owned the pictures in the club room and the tub of Orvis shampoo. (FWIW, I am back with the trainer that quit.)

In the case of "full service" that did not include hand walking a post colic horse, I left and ate the deposit.

kgro632
Oct. 6, 2009, 12:28 AM
Op, you have already paid for the month of October right? So you are going to be requesting a refund?

You should have alerted them on the first with your board and 30 days notice, I know it sucks but it is customary, and the "proper ettiquette".

SuperSTB
Oct. 6, 2009, 01:15 AM
Kills me how we have to be courteous to the BO but they don't have to do any thing to respect the boarder. Kick the client out with less than 24 hours notice but they get 30 days of board.

Actually a bad rep for a barn can be downright impossible to get rid of. So a facility run well shows in that they treat boarders as they are... clients. I think all of us know barns with bad reputations even though we personally don't have first hand experience.

englishivy
Oct. 6, 2009, 10:23 AM
Being kicked out with 24 hour notice, changes in care or trainers, etc are EXACTLY why you should have a boarding contract; it covers the BO and the client, as well as details the responsibilities of both.

Additionally, any good contract will have a default clause. So if the care of your horse is not living up to the standards set by your boarding contract, you can go through the process of claming the BO is in "default"; usually it requires giving written notice sent by certified mail and then giving a set amount of days for the BO to "make good" on the contract. If the BO fails to take action, the boarder can leave without giving notice and without being in "default" herself.

If I was a boarder and went to a barn that DIDN'T have a boarding contract, I'd be leary of boarding there....doesn't seem like they will bother with all the little details of my horse's care if they won't even take the time to write a contract. :no:

findeight
Oct. 6, 2009, 10:44 AM
I thought you didn't have to pay the 30 days if they aren't holding up their end of the deal, such as the care or training the contract says it should as you mentioned.

But you will have to pay it to get the horse off the property and the law on that will be on the BOs side because of the contract language. Then you could persue it in small claims court for a refund.

Or you would have to prove it in court to obtain an order allowing you to remove the horse and dispute it in court.

In either case that means you will have to also show you gave the BO written notice of any contract breach on their part via acknowledged certified letter (or e mail if you can prove they read them) and allowed them to remedy the situation.

You can't just split with no notice, no warning and no paper trail and stiff them on the board you are contractually obligated for. Or you can but you will be in court shortly.

Over the years been involved with a couple of these disputes-it's hard to prove care was lacking if there is no documentation you were unhappy but there is that contract you signed promising 30 days.

Both times, the judge asked why they stayed so long if it was so bad. And why the was no record of any complaints to the BO. They both lost too.

Anybody having alot of trouble finding decent and ethical places needs to revamp their selection criteria and, maybe, be willing to pay more for decent care.

Lots of crap places out there-big red light is lots of empty stalls and way below what the others are charging. Lots of good ones too-cost a little more and have waiting lists.

RockinHorse
Oct. 6, 2009, 11:27 AM
Without a contract you are not legally required to give notice at all.

I am not an attorney, however, I don't think this is correct. The OP does not have a written contract. That does not necessarily mean there is NO contract. Depending on the location, since 30 days is reasonable and customary, should a dispute go to court the ruling could easily go to the BO.

enjoytheride
Oct. 6, 2009, 12:03 PM
I my first barn went downhill pretty fast and 8 boarders left in 60 days. Many left with no notice at all due to the situation. I tried to give my notice but I had to lead my horse off the property two weeks later. As in, no trailer. I walked my horse 6 miles through the sububrbs because I couldn't get a trailer on the property, even giving my notice. I gave my notice and they stopped feeding my horse the next day.

The BO locked all the horses in stalls, locked all the turnouts, locked the gates to the trails, parked their trailer in the middle of the driveway, and stopped feeding all the horses. The police were there a few times, a couple vets, etc. The BO tried to force a hauling company off the property. Banned people with trailers from showing up, etc.

The conclusion was that the BO could not force anyone to give a notice and if they wanted to take those boarders to court to get their money they could. However, considering that none of the horses had been turned out or had their stalls cleaned in a month, and most of the horses had dropped vast amounts of weight it was unlikely that they would win. The police escorted several people off the property and I ended up leaving when the BO left for a show. That still didn't prevent the BO from coming back early and screaming at me the entire time.

Frankly in that situation none of the new barns really gave a crap that the owners didn't give notice considering the condition of the horses arriving.

In the OPs situation I would give my notice and leave, letting them keep the entire check for October. If there was a contract you would have to complete the contract provided the care was sufficient.

Ozone
Oct. 6, 2009, 01:36 PM
I dont have a contract and would like to leave pretty quickly after I have the talk (I'm thinking maybe doing it tomorrow), and I dont want to pay for more than the prorated board for the days that I am there. Is that bad?

Under no circumstances would I be unprofessional or rude during the conversation, no worries there.

Yes, that is "Bad" to do. I serioulsy cannot stand it when someone does this. At least have a little coth and give the person who has been caring for your horse respect of 30 days AT LEAST! That gives the BO time to fill the stall etc. and it shows that you have respect. :no:

ETA - I can see if it is a bad situation like some stated above. But, if you are just leaving to leave then please do the right thing. You never know when you, as the client will need a BO of the past's help.......

SuperSTB
Oct. 6, 2009, 03:06 PM
I my first barn went downhill pretty fast and 8 boarders left in 60 days. Many left with no notice at all due to the situation. I tried to give my notice but I had to lead my horse off the property two weeks later. As in, no trailer. I walked my horse 6 miles through the sububrbs because I couldn't get a trailer on the property, even giving my notice. I gave my notice and they stopped feeding my horse the next day.

The BO locked all the horses in stalls, locked all the turnouts, locked the gates to the trails, parked their trailer in the middle of the driveway, and stopped feeding all the horses. The police were there a few times, a couple vets, etc. The BO tried to force a hauling company off the property. Banned people with trailers from showing up, etc.

The conclusion was that the BO could not force anyone to give a notice and if they wanted to take those boarders to court to get their money they could. However, considering that none of the horses had been turned out or had their stalls cleaned in a month, and most of the horses had dropped vast amounts of weight it was unlikely that they would win. The police escorted several people off the property and I ended up leaving when the BO left for a show. That still didn't prevent the BO from coming back early and screaming at me the entire time.

Frankly in that situation none of the new barns really gave a crap that the owners didn't give notice considering the condition of the horses arriving.

In the OPs situation I would give my notice and leave, letting them keep the entire check for October. If there was a contract you would have to complete the contract provided the care was sufficient.

The warning signs were probably there for months prior to your barn's fiasco to warn all involved that it was going to be messy.

I've been on both sides of the fence- as a boarder and as someone who ran a place. No one is perfect and we all make some judgement mistakes but if you tow the line with respect and professionalism... things usually go smoother than you think. People tend to feed off the drama of others- especially in a boarding facility- so if you can avoid that, by all means do so.

The best course of action is: give notice and don't expect to get prepaid board refund (as a BO though I have given refunds in specific situations). Do not say more than the very basic. Be sure to thank any fellow boarders or employees that have help you over the duration of your boarding period. Make sure you coordinate your 'exit plan' clearly with the BO, example: I will be hauling my horse out at 10AM Saturday morning- is there any conflict with other barn activities I need to be aware of? And stick to that exit plan! As to any barn drama- just leave it all behind you.

AlterEgoME
Oct. 6, 2009, 08:17 PM
My situation where the help quit and stalls were not being cleaned, etc went south pretty fast as well. BO lost her job for cause and was already in debt (which no one knew). When she stopped paying the boys and the feed store I left and lost my deposit. That quick move put me in the situation where "full service" did not include hand walking a coliced horse. It was my fault and in my haste and needing stalls for 7 horses, I did not think to ask "does full service include handwalking a horse on stall rest?" This barn had only two stalls, iirc and went out of their way to make room for me, by using their "clinic" barn. So again, lost deposit. (The story is obviously very complicated.)

The trainer/BO fight that went to Natural Horsemanship, saw that one coming about 30 days in advance. Barn was sold, trainer stayed. New owner and trainer tried to make it work. We all saw the writing on the wall. Took my time finding the next place.

As a PP said, when it goes south, boarders have very little recourse. Barn owners are in the position of power. They have your horses, sometimes a good bit of money and a contract. In all three of these situations I had a contract. That really didn't matter. I wasn't going to wade through the process while my horse's health was in jeopardy. And it is also true, that no one in the community would have ever held the quick departure against me.

TrakeGirl
Oct. 9, 2009, 02:48 PM
Just wondering how this situation turned out.

And wanted to add that as I posted - I gave P-L-E-N-T-Y of notice (over six weeks) and paid everything in full and then some - because I wanted to keep good relations in case I ever needed to send a horse there again...I have been quite surprised by the attitude of the barn owner (whom I would consider a friend) since I have left.

Has kinda gotten nasty. I have witnessed her become hostile towards others that have chose to move on. But I had boarded there for a long time (the others hadn't), I gave her plenty of notice and was SO up front and honest (the others were not) - I didn't think there would be any hard feelings especially since the ONLY reason I had to move my horse was because she couldn't offer the turnout he needed (and she completely agreed with me).

I am chalking it up to lack of professionalism on her part and going to move on - clearly me leaving has hurt her feelings in some way and she is lashing out - but it has seriously given me pause about ever sending a horse there again. So...not only should boarders be careful on how they leave things - same goes with a BO.

jmvwiv
Oct. 9, 2009, 08:25 PM
Just wondering how this situation turned out.



Well I met with her the first day she was available (she was sick the first several days this month) and gave her my notice. I've been there 6 years so it was going to be a really hard conversation no matter what I said. I kept things on me as to why I was moving. That I needed to regroup & needed a change, etc. Since I didnt have the exact date or exact mode of transportation of getting there completely worked out I simply said "I was still coming to a decision" on where the horse was moving. I had no idea how she would react so I was prepared for the worst & hoped for the best. I made sure I had a 30 day check ready to pay her in full. I wrote paid in full on it too, thanks to someone's advice here. I hope to have my horse moved on Tuesday. Nailing down the shipper has proven to be harder than I anticipated - its only 16 miles for crying out loud! At the meeting she was really nice and professional, probably confused. So far she's been nice on the phone (I havent been out there & seen her in person yet) but she is going to press me to know where the horse is going. I know when I tell her the nice tune will likely change. But again I'm preparing for the worst & hoping for the best on that one too. I think I did everything right so far.

meupatdoes
Oct. 9, 2009, 09:04 PM
And it is also true, that no one in the community would have ever held the quick departure against me.

When stuff really goes south, the community generally knows it.

I had one situation where I left with my horse (and three other horses left too) on two hours notice. Literally I was boarding there in the morning and by afternoon I was somewhere else.

The BO (drunkenly) called every facility in town to find out where I had gone, and when she finally found my new barn owner she (...drunkenly) told her to watch out: I would not pay my bill, would steal her clients, and would sleep with her husband.
:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:
The new BO laughed and told me about it the next day.

Meanwhile, word got around to all the grooms in the barns in the area (the blowup involved, among other things, a very poorly treated groom), and people I did not even know were coming up to me saying they heard what had happened and supported me and thank you. (...!!!!)


So, word gets around.
If the situation is really bad, the community will know.
If the boarder is creating the problem, the community will also know.

MissBri
Oct. 9, 2009, 09:30 PM
Honestly, if the BO asks where you are going, I would simply look her directly in the eye and slowly ask "why?"