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View Full Version : Video: A new way to halt at X!



MargaretW
Oct. 1, 2009, 05:49 AM
Well, here's a final halt that will be remembered for a while!
http://www.barnmice.com/video/a-very-spectacular-halt

Cat - OnceUponADressageDream
Oct. 1, 2009, 06:12 AM
Hahahaha very cute! Wonder what the rider thought....I reckon I wouldn't know whether to laugh or cry if it were me! Loved the remount, salute and applause ;)

slc2
Oct. 1, 2009, 07:11 AM
When he started blowing his nose so hard, I knew he was going to pull something, I just wasn't sure what.

riderboy
Oct. 1, 2009, 07:35 AM
That's hilarious! He's like "I'm done, that was really hard!"

twofatponies
Oct. 1, 2009, 07:36 AM
Well handled by the rider, no? Too cute!

JRG
Oct. 1, 2009, 07:39 AM
I can't say I would be as cool under pressure as that rider, good for her. The pony is so cute. Surely one for the rider's family video album.

bird4416
Oct. 1, 2009, 07:57 AM
Wonder how the judge scored that one!

rabicon
Oct. 1, 2009, 08:54 AM
OMG. Well handled by the rider. Thats just to cute. I to wonder how the judge scored that.

goeslikestink
Oct. 1, 2009, 10:40 AM
well she took it on the chin - bless her

LisaW-B
Oct. 1, 2009, 10:55 AM
OMG!!! Naughty, naughty pinto! The rider handled that so well. Wonder how hard she and the judge were laughing.

Shrunk "N" Da Wash
Oct. 1, 2009, 12:28 PM
Well handled by rider...

mickeydoodle
Oct. 1, 2009, 02:10 PM
Naughty Pony!!!

Sudi's Girl
Oct. 1, 2009, 03:49 PM
Very impressed by that rider! Way to handle that pony!! :winkgrin:

InsideLeg2OutsideRein
Oct. 1, 2009, 04:02 PM
Lol, I wonder if that was the first time the pony has done that... :lol:

Foxtrot's
Oct. 1, 2009, 05:00 PM
...I don't think so - it looks like that is one of his tricks judging by the way she knew just what to do! :) :)

flyracing
Oct. 2, 2009, 10:54 PM
I'm thinking that had happened before since everyone starting laughing the second the pony went down. If my horses legs suddenly buckled at the halt I would be concerned not laughing, so I'd say its happened before and they are lucking there is no entering salute. So whats the rule for a horse falling (by eventing rules, this horse had a "fall") in dressage? Anybody know what country this was in? England?

slc2
Oct. 3, 2009, 04:33 AM
No, actually, she didn't handle it well, and it appears to be a long standing habit. Instead of doing nothing or laughing when it's over, when you feel the horse's legs start to buckle, and he stops moving forward, you know he is intending to lie down. You think fast, you feel what he's doing, you react very very quickly, you very quickly start punishing the horse, and then make them gallop forward, and you do whatever you have to do to make them gallop forward, and then it becomes not a habit. If he does it only at the halt, then you gallop forward out of the halt. Horse show? So what? If you don't like doing it at a horse show, stay at home til the habit is fixed.

No, actually, the horse is not in pain. The saddle does not hurt. He is not lame. He doesn't have anything wrong with his back. He isn't doing this because someone was mean to him or he had a traumatic foalhood. He does this because he's learned to do this, because it gets him out of work. A horse thinks one second ahead. If lying down reduces his work load for one split second the behavior is rewarded. Just like a chronic rearer learns to rear - he doesn't care if the rider then dismounts, takes him to a round pen, makes him run in the round pen for an hour, yells at him and then gets back on him and 'teaches him a lesson'...he only understands the moment, he rears, and the rider is paralyzed and does nothing. Reward.

Usually, little kids learn this with little ponies. Little ponies are often quite smart after years of undisciplined riding and little training, and they start doing these things.

It is a dangerous habit, and it is not funny, actually. A person can get hurt with a 700-1200 lb animal lying down on their leg (watched someone break their foot in about 16 places when a horse laid down on them), and it is also the kind of habit that gets an animal wound up in a dog food can. It tends to escalate, and it tends to wind up with the animal throwing himself down more and more abruptly, such as while cantering, and so with more and more serious injury to the rider.

This pony was showing a problem the entire test, it was even more obvious from the time he started with the loud blowing of his nose and was being disobedient under saddle, you can see the rider waggling his head back and forth rapidly in an effort to get him to stop pulling on her. He's a bad actor, and he needs to be fixed, and it's the responsibility of the rider to fix it, and not just sell their problems they made to someone else or have their problems put down.

egontoast
Oct. 3, 2009, 05:15 AM
No, actually, she didn't handle it well, and it appears to be a long standing habit. Instead of doing nothing or laughing when it's over, when you feel the horse's legs start to buckle, and he stops moving forward, you know he is intending to lie down. You think fast, you feel what he's doing, you react very very quickly, you very quickly start punishing the horse, and then make them gallop forward, and you do whatever you have to do to make them gallop forward, and then it becomes not a habit. If he does it only at the halt, then you gallop forward out of the halt. Horse show? So what? If you don't like doing it at a horse show, stay at home til the habit is fixed.

No, actually, the horse is not in pain. The saddle does not hurt. He is not lame. He doesn't have anything wrong with his back. He isn't doing this because someone was mean to him or he had a traumatic foalhood. He does this because he's learned to do this, because it gets him out of work. A horse thinks one second ahead. If lying down reduces his work load for one split second the behavior is rewarded. Just like a chronic rearer learns to rear - he doesn't care if the rider then dismounts, takes him to a round pen, makes him run in the round pen for an hour, yells at him and then gets back on him and 'teaches him a lesson'...he only understands the moment, he rears, and the rider is paralyzed and does nothing. Reward.

Usually, little kids learn this with little ponies. Little ponies are often quite smart after years of undisciplined riding and little training, and they start doing these things.

It is a dangerous habit, and it is not funny, actually. A person can get hurt with a 700-1200 lb animal lying down on their leg (watched someone break their foot in about 16 places when a horse laid down on them), and it is also the kind of habit that gets an animal wound up in a dog food can. It tends to escalate, and it tends to wind up with the animal throwing himself down more and more abruptly, such as while cantering, and so with more and more serious injury to the rider.

This pony was showing a problem the entire test, it was even more obvious from the time he started with the loud blowing of his nose and was being disobedient under saddle, you can see the rider waggling his head back and forth rapidly in an effort to get him to stop pulling on her. He's a bad actor, and he needs to be fixed, and it's the responsibility of the rider to fix it, and not just sell their problems they made to someone else or have their problems put down.

OH my, the horror!!! I'd cut the young person some slack in these circumstances. You are assuming a lot of things there that might be just in your head.

It's quite possible she was completely taken by surprise and so did not react in the way you would have liked,slc.

JRG
Oct. 3, 2009, 07:36 AM
OH my, the horror!!! I'd cut the young person some slack in these circumstances.

It's quite possible she was completely taken by surprise and so did not react in the way you would have liked,slc.

I agree, it just a cute pony and kid doing a dressage test. It's funny. The kid wasn't doing PSG.

slc2
Oct. 3, 2009, 07:44 AM
I would use the same statements to support my position.

enjoytheride
Oct. 3, 2009, 09:32 AM
Yikes I actually think the test was pretty nice.

egontoast
Oct. 3, 2009, 12:59 PM
I would use the same statements to support my position.

Your "position"?:lol:

Good Lord. It's not exactly the Hague (though it could be the hag).:)

I think maybe you take this whole internet expert thing just a little too seriously.

ise@ssl
Oct. 3, 2009, 01:40 PM
Good heavens - we weren't there and we don't know the pony or the rider. I kept expecting a buck or a rear and technically the ride was ended - she did halt so letting out the reins was something most people would do. Very funny and the rider did handle it very well.

I also thought it was a very nice test.

Hony
Oct. 3, 2009, 02:40 PM
I thought it was hilarious. The horse wasn't doing it to get out of work, he did it because that sand looked damn nice to roll in after a workout. I don't think the rider had enough time to change the result, she wasn't even halted when the pony went down. She got him up immediately and got back on. I don't know what video you're watching SLC but get a grip, it's not always a debate.

slc2
Oct. 3, 2009, 02:51 PM
No, I'm not debating and rarely do so anyway. I just said I don't think it's 'cute' or 'funny' when horses lie down and roll. A person can get hurt. And it can get to be a very bad habit. And I think the reaction would be very different if it were a horse instead of a pony. Anything a pony does is 'cute'.

Mach Two
Oct. 3, 2009, 03:08 PM
Oh the horror! Oh the drama! Rider and trainer should be spanked....NOT!
The rider is a youth in GB, obviously, from her dress and the shortish banged tail. And she does not need to be chastised and banned for her actions. She got her horse up, and got him shown...what fun it made for the audience and judge.
In eventing dressage in the US, a rider can have a fall and remount...don't know about a horse "fall".
I almost coughed coffee on my keyboard. :winkgrin:

Alagirl
Oct. 3, 2009, 03:35 PM
...I don't think so - it looks like that is one of his tricks judging by the way she knew just what to do! :) :)

HAHAHAHAHA.

what she should have done was use that crop and smack him a couple. :yes:

Not going quiet as far as SLC, but this is - while funny - not the way to go about it.

I had a coming 3 year old TB gelding on the 1st ride coming home from getting started did the same thing on the way home. After the initial wtf moment the rider gave him a couple good ones and guess what, problem solved for good.

Cute pony, nice girl, maybe too nice to ride that trickey ole stinker! :lol:

FancyFree
Oct. 3, 2009, 03:46 PM
No, actually, she didn't handle it well, and it appears to be a long standing habit.

How do you know that it's a long standing habit? How does it appear that way?

It might be though. When I was eleven, I had a horse that would roll me off when I took him out on trail. If I didn't catch him the second before he was going down and crop his ass, I'd be walking home. Oh it used to irritate me so much! So if it is a habit, she has my sympathies.

It could also be the pony thought "This is a lovely ring for a roll!" The footing does look soft.

It was cute, whatever the case.

fp_wonders
Oct. 3, 2009, 04:03 PM
I agree that this probably isn't the first time the pony's done this, and it's certainly not a cute habit, especially for a pony. I can imagine a smaller child getting very hurt very easily. This older girl seems to be able to handle it, but she may not always be the one riding the pony.

It did make me laugh, but on the same note, I was a bit surprised the pony didn't get a sharp whack with that crop. That is definitely a no-no move.

Hony
Oct. 3, 2009, 05:31 PM
No, I'm not debating and rarely do so anyway. I just said I don't think it's 'cute' or 'funny' when horses lie down and roll. A person can get hurt. And it can get to be a very bad habit. And I think the reaction would be very different if it were a horse instead of a pony. Anything a pony does is 'cute'.

Blah blah blah blah blah. If a horse did it it would be equally funny. Nothing bad happened. Lighten up.

The pony could have used a smack or several but the show ring is not the place for it. The rider did just fine.