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View Full Version : My Epics came!!!!!



starkissed
Sep. 24, 2009, 09:58 PM
My easyboot Epics came today- I have been obsessed with tracking the online order. But today they came!!
And guess what? They fit beautifully. And they were not hard at ALL to put on, truely easy!

Todd was- VERY happy! He saw the rocks on the driveway and went- NO those hurt, but I kept nudging him and when he got on he was like "I can walk!!!"

We had an amazing trail ride and I really tested those suckers, mud, trotting, cantering, steep hills. I was so impressed, coming from someone who always thought boots were kind of dumb.

Sorry I didn't get pictures, I was too excited to get to the barn and I board so I couldnt run in the house!


I am just so happy that now we can go on a trail ride and truely relax and have fun. Before I felt like I was torturing him byt making him limp along the trails to give a break from the ring

matryoshka
Sep. 25, 2009, 01:09 AM
Glad they are working out for you! It's such a good feeling to know your horse is comfortable.

Sithly
Sep. 25, 2009, 02:41 AM
Hey, congrats. :) I have a pair too, and I love them. I use them for parades and for camping trips when the terrain's rockier than what we're used to. Been very pleased with them!

Golden Girl
Sep. 25, 2009, 09:29 AM
I was wondering if you just put them on the front, or all around? I have a similar horse that hates to go on rocks, but the boots on the front help immensely! :yes:

matryoshka
Sep. 25, 2009, 11:43 AM
My OTTB has Old Macs on the fronts and Epics on the hinds. He is much happier with boots on all four feet. So was the OTTB I used to ride. If they were shod, it would have to be all the way around.

My little Arab mare just gets Easyboots on the front. When we start conditioning for CTR or endurance, I'll likely boot her all the way around.

PRS
Sep. 25, 2009, 02:56 PM
Congratulations! Before I got Old Mac's for my gelding it was like I felt every rock he went over. Now we can both move out with confidence. It made such a HUGE difference! My horse is much happier with the his boots on! I don't know why everybody doesn't use boots for their horse.

starkissed
Sep. 28, 2009, 09:32 PM
I was wondering if you just put them on the front, or all around? I have a similar horse that hates to go on rocks, but the boots on the front help immensely! :yes:

Hey golden-
I just got them for the front. Yes my horse probably would be more comfortable with boots behind as well, but he is doing pretty good with just the fronts. I am going to be paying a lot of attention to his feet now, like barefoot trimming and such.
Yesterday we got lost on the trails and ended up riding for 3 hours (ha my little show horse was dying!) I even got off and walked with him for a little bit! But without the boots we would have never made it.
I am still surprised at how much he can still feel the rocks even with the boots. He is probably 75% more sound with the boots. And if I put some pads or something he would probably be 100%. But we don't do a whole lot and he doesnt seem to be suffering terribly!

matryoshka
Sep. 29, 2009, 09:29 AM
...I am still surprised at how much he can still feel the rocks even with the boots. He is probably 75% more sound with the boots. And if I put some pads or something he would probably be 100%. But we don't do a whole lot and he doesnt seem to be suffering terribly!He would benefit from pads if he is still reacting to rocks. He may not always need them, but they will help him through the first few months.

I use a leather pad like the shoers use. But you can get some nice, cushy 12mm pads through the internet. They do wear out with use, so you might want to get a couple pairs at first.

starkissed
Oct. 1, 2009, 09:03 PM
He would benefit from pads if he is still reacting to rocks. He may not always need them, but they will help him through the first few months.

I use a leather pad like the shoers use. But you can get some nice, cushy 12mm pads through the internet. They do wear out with use, so you might want to get a couple pairs at first.


oh you think so? Thanks I might do just that. He has always been barefoot, but if you think they will help him I definitely will. I have been watchign some of Pete Ramey's DVDs and he said that its really important to be using the foot correctly, landing on the heel/frog, in order to develop a strong hoof. I am not sure if he is landing that way to tell the truth.
Are the pads sold in sizes that would correspond to his hoof boot size?

matryoshka
Oct. 2, 2009, 12:56 AM
You buy an approximate size and cut them down (usually they give you a size range). I use the leather pads I buy at the farrier supply store rather than using foam pads, but a lot of people love the foam pads. They wear out a bit too quickly IMHO.

An important consideration will be the thickness. A lot of people start with 12mm pads. They also offer 6mm pads.

The other thing to check for when sensitive on rocks is the presence of thrush in the frog or the white line (will be black). Sometimes the solution for gimpiness on rocks it is as simple as taking care of the thrush. Especially check the center suclus of the frog. The back of the triangle (at the widest part of the frog) should be a divot where you can put your finger in, not a crevice or a crack. If it is a crevice, then thrush is growing in there, and it is painful. If there is no crevice, then you've eliminated one possible cause of the soreness.

I mention this (center sulcus infection) often on these threads because it is a very common thing, and many people don't realize it is a cause of sensitivity for the horse. Many farriers/trimmers/and even vets are not aware of the problem, and so they don't know to tell owners when they see it. I'm trying to spread the knowledge. I learned about it at a Pete Ramey clinic a few years ago, but thinking back, I've also seen farriers discuss this problem on www.horseshoes.com (http://www.horseshoes.com), so the info isn't exactly new--just not well diseminated . ;)

Some horses continue to be sore on rocks because their feet are flat. I've had 3 TB's like this. They needed boots no matter how healthy I got their feet. I've found leather pads to work very well inside boots for these horses.

There are things about a trim that can change the way a horse lands. If your horse is landing toe first, there is a reason for it. That needs to be corrected for optimal hoof health, but first you have to figure out why. A flat landing is okay. Can you put your horse on a lunge line to watch him move? A toe-first landing casses the fetlock to snap into place during loading and is fairly distinctive, once you know what to look for. A flat or heel-first landing goes with smoother motion of the fetlock, since it is flexed down upon landing and simply sinks down farther during loading.

Sorry if this is too much information. I tend to just dump info.