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EquineRacers
Sep. 21, 2009, 06:46 PM
Currently I gallop and do dab into owning a couple race horses as well (but we all know you spend more money then you make with ownership! LOL ) Galloping does pay fairly well when you are busy and not injuried :lol: and owning a few horses is just a whole bunch of fun.

I also have an afternoon job working at a local hospital, but lets face it my heart isn't into it. I'm a horse girl, completely obsessed and would like to built a bigger future into that and found a special connection with the racehorses and the industry.

I do a lot of selling horses off the track into new homes for decent ammount of money, depending on the horse that is, and have been told I'm pretty good at it as well. I also found I love going to the racehorse sales and checking out all the upcoming racing prospects and love to keep notes of my favorites and track them thorough their racing careers.

Now, my question is, what do you think of becoming a Bloodstock agent? Hard to get into? How do you even get into it? Anyone who has been in it have any advice?

Acertainsmile
Sep. 21, 2009, 08:17 PM
My best advice would be to go to work for a fairly large outfit during sale time. If you feel it's for you, ask to become a regular, help prep, etc. Good Luck!

Blinkers On
Sep. 21, 2009, 08:55 PM
It is a hit and miss business venture. It can be feast or famine. With the current economic state, I would try to dabble in blood stock, but IMO don't quit your day job;) It might just pay for some of the things you really want.

Pronzini
Sep. 21, 2009, 09:54 PM
It's a people person kind of job like being a realtor. You not only need to connect with current and future clients but give them confidence that you know what you are looking at and that you will represent them fairly. An awful lot of con artists out there especially when the market was fat and a lot of people who could invest in the business are licking their wounds.

Las Olas
Sep. 21, 2009, 10:25 PM
It takes a long time to build up enough reputation to make a living at it. I would suggest going to work for someone in the business first. It's all about name recognition and people trusting your judgement. The other option is to continue what you are doing, and expand from there. However, if you choose this route, then, as BlinkersOn mentioned, don't quit your day job. The market is tough, and even the high end guys are having trouble.

Equilibrium
Sep. 22, 2009, 12:43 AM
It takes a long time to build up enough reputation to make a living at it. I would suggest going to work for someone in the business first. It's all about name recognition and people trusting your judgement. The other option is to continue what you are doing, and expand from there. However, if you choose this route, then, as BlinkersOn mentioned, don't quit your day job. The market is tough, and even the high end guys are having trouble.

Very good advice. And it's not really like being a realtor. It's not what you know, it's who you know so definitely get with a big outfit even if your a coffee runner for a bit.

Terri

mares tails
Sep. 22, 2009, 12:39 PM
It's harder now that dual agency is frowned on :lol:

.

Bacchus
Sep. 23, 2009, 11:02 AM
It really is a lot of "who you know." Without an "in," I can't imagine getting started. You need an owner who is willing to use you, but then you have to show some winners. Do you plan to buy yearlings, pin-hook weanlings, buy horses in training, mares, everything or something else? It can take quite a while to build a reputation.

I agree with working for someone else. Personally, I'd try to get an internship with a bloodstock agency/agent. Get to know some people, pick a few good horses, work your way up, etc.

If you have the money, start pin-hooking for yourself -- if you do well and get noticed, clients are next.

Don't quit your day job!