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View Full Version : Hunter Prospect with huge Quarter Crack - Advice?



lohsela
Sep. 21, 2009, 09:44 AM
Hi! Just looking for advice from anyone who's worked with horses with major hoof cracks... I'm trying out this 3 y/o dutch wb/ tb cross gelding who's super cute. I'm looking to bring a long this horse for a 3' hunter with potential for higher. I really like him, but his has a massive crack in his left from hoof all the way to the coronet band... I will obviously have a PPE done before I purchase him, but does anyone have experience with this? Do you think it will significantly affect him? :confused:

Hunter Mom
Sep. 21, 2009, 10:22 AM
It depends on how deep it is. Mare had one last summer, but it didn't go deep enough to make it a problem for her ever. Have a farrier look at it.

toomanyponies
Sep. 21, 2009, 10:22 AM
Yes. Is it superficial, or truly a quarter crack?

If the crack is a result of bad conformation, run like the wind. If a result of poor shoeing, you might be ok,if you have a very good blacksmith and time.

EMWalker
Sep. 21, 2009, 11:04 AM
RUN AWAY!!! FAR FAR AWAY!

I bought a horse two years ago and his hoof keeps cracking and he isn't sound on it when it cracks. Physically there is nothing wrong with him and it is only one foot that has the problem. This horse BROKE my heart -- he is the most talented jumper. (Look at the photos below of Harbour Town if you want poof of his jump) I wouldn't want anyone else to have to go through what I have gone through.

Mine is sound now and he is headed back to work but I am not holding my breath. :no:

Justice
Sep. 21, 2009, 11:56 AM
I echo EMWalker - run like the wind. Especially with young horses that have not proved their soundness over time, why take the risk? Situations like this are more heartbreaking when the horse is spectacular, because no hoof, no horse.

And, EMWalker, I am so sorry to hear about Otto. I've always admired his pictures, and can only imagine the pain of having such a nice one stuck in the barn. Glad he's making a comeback!

hollyhorse2000
Sep. 21, 2009, 12:41 PM
In a young horse, run like the wind is good advice.

In an older, trained horse, it's more of a choice, I think. I have an older, schoolmaster-type warmblood who I bought with a quarter crack five years ago -- she still has it. Lots of good shoeing and not lame on it, but definitely not appropriate for holding up to a show schedule (probably why she was retired so early) but works for what I want.

lohsela
Sep. 21, 2009, 01:25 PM
I called my vet to get his opinion this am... he's having me take some pics of it to send to him before I do a PPE... just in case... but he did say if it's superficial it will probably be okay...

The horse is totally sound on the foot now and it's cracked... he's in a 6 day per week riding program right now and only jumping once per week... it's a tough one that I'm just going to have to play by ear I guess... :(

Alibhai's Alibar
Sep. 21, 2009, 01:35 PM
Is there any way to have your farrier look at the horse or photos of the crack? Might be a valuable second opinion.

TSWJB
Sep. 21, 2009, 01:38 PM
[QUOTE=EMWalker;4389586]This horse BROKE my heart -- he is the most talented jumper. (Look at the photos below of Harbour Town if you want poof of his jump) I wouldn't want anyone else to have to go through what I have gone through.
QUOTE]

wow i am so sorry to hear of this horse being a problem for you. he is gorgeous! how long has he been lame?
i dont buy problems. i would find another horse.
but my friend has a horse who cracked up the front center of the hoofs on both front feet. it looked really bad to me, but the farrier said superficial. so i would have the horse checked by a farrier first and then the vet.

showponies
Sep. 21, 2009, 01:44 PM
We had a race horse with 1/4 cracks, just bad feet..Still won, no issues..Home now and I do have to work to keep her feet dry( NW weather) bit I made my own hoof cream, Shea Butter and Tea Tree Oil..Her feet LOOK GREAT , ..20 some years ago when i was a barn manager on the East Coast, we had a BIG time jumper who had 1/4 cracks..At that time the trainer had me feed him gelitin...Seemed to do the job...

Don't panic yet until your vet and shoer looks at the horse, could be a good bargin on the price;)

Mango7
Sep. 21, 2009, 01:48 PM
My horse has quarter crack issues due to the conformation of his hoof and all the pressure is hitting on area, where the cracks happen. I was able to get it under control with a good farrier, bar shoes with pads, and lamina saver supplement. He will occasionally need fiberglass patches on his hoof if a crack starts. My horse is now showing 3'0-3'3 and the cracks are rare, but expect to have to pay to keep it under control. My horse needs to be trimmed every 5 weeks to keep his toes short, and bar shoes and patches can be expensive. Lamina saver from a few months is about $200.

lohsela
Sep. 21, 2009, 01:50 PM
We had a race horse with 1/4 cracks, just bad feet..Still won, no issues..Home now and I do have to work to keep her feet dry( NW weather) bit I made my own hoof cream, Shea Butter and Tea Tree Oil..Her feet LOOK GREAT , ..20 some years ago when i was a barn manager on the East Coast, we had a BIG time jumper who had 1/4 cracks..At that time the trainer had me feed him gelitin...Seemed to do the job...

Don't panic yet until your vet and shoer looks at the horse, could be a good bargin on the price;)

That's what I'm thinking too ;) and my vet is a horseshoer too... so I get the best of both worlds by having him look at it... I don't want to buy a problem either... I just sent the last horse I tried back because of a failed flexion on the PPE... but I don't know anything about these types of cracks... mind you he still has to pass the rest of the PPE... :)

MistyPony
Sep. 21, 2009, 02:26 PM
Another quarter crack survivor here! They're not fun for sure. My mare never took a lame step on hers but I had to stop riding her to get it to grow out. It's been a frustrating year that I wouldn't wish on anyone. I don't have any new suggestions over the advice everyone else has offered except that you need to consider the cost/benefit problem here. How much is the horse? Do you have the means to afford another horse if this one decides to take a year off? Can you afford $200 every 6 weeks for corrective shoeing?

After my experience I would NOT throw all my eggs in one basket on a horse with a quarter crack. If you can only afford one horse and you want to get a lot of show mileage with your purchase you may want to keep looking.

PonyPenny
Sep. 21, 2009, 05:06 PM
A mare of mine got a quarter crack on the outside hoofwall that went up past the coronet band. The farrier patch it, but as the crack started to grow out, she started to have trouble keeping the shoe on and was slightly off. I ended up pulling the shoe, putting an easy boot on her and laying her up in my backyard where she could walk around. In about five months, the shoe came back on and I was able to lightly hack her. I did not jump her until the crack was all the way grown out. It took a year. My farrier also modified the way she was shod and I doubled the amount of grand hoof I gave her. She never had another crack, but it did take a year out of her training. I got pregnant at the time, so it was a good time for her to be out of commission.

If it can be determined what caused the crack in the first place and how severe it is, would be deciding factors in whether I would purchase a horse with a crack. Hopefully your yet and farrier can give you some answers.

Cavesson
Sep. 21, 2009, 05:21 PM
A friend of mine bought a reiner with a small quarter crack ended up having navicular! Now he is just a pet, can't be ridden at all. Not saying its an indication or even related but pull out all the stops if you do try to buy him. Have him vetted, x-rays... it will save you in the long run if he finds something.

Just my 2cents

faraway46
Sep. 21, 2009, 05:34 PM
In Argentina my vet produces an ozoned vegetable oil with DMSO that guarantees twice as much growth. I have tested it myself on various horses and it works miracles with brittle hooves, poor growth, quarter cracks and thrush. It's called OzoneFlu here in Argentina and he is trying to start marketing in USA as a hoof enhancer (and not as hoof medication due to FDA issues). He has even recovered a horse with laminitis with this product (and corrective shoeing, of course)! I have personally witnessed all these field tests and I stand by the product 110%.
This is their website:
http://www.ozonflu.com/eng/
My vet's name is Carlos Pastoriza and his brother (also a vet) is Jose Maria.
I swear it absolutely worth the try: affordable (about u$s30 in Argentina), easy to use and effective. If you want any more info mail me, but believe me it works wonders...
Viv

Kikki
Sep. 22, 2009, 01:51 AM
I'd have YOUR farrier look at the hoof if at all possible because s/he is the one that will have to deal with it. If your vet and farrier are both on the same page that its something that can be dealt with, then I'd be comfortable proceeding with the prepurchase. But I'd deal with the foot before I spent a lot on xrays and such.

Addison
Sep. 22, 2009, 07:52 AM
I would not even consider buyiing such a prospect. There are too many horses for sale right now to have to compromise with such an unpredictable type of problem.

EMWalker
Sep. 22, 2009, 11:10 AM
wow i am so sorry to hear of this horse being a problem for you. he is gorgeous! how long has he been lame?

Thanks. This horse really has broken my heart. He had no cracks when we bought him and passed the vet check just fine. Brought him back to Houston and after 3 weeks of hard showing in Ocala it cracked when he was turned out! His start up high and bleeds and hurts him. He took a year off, it grew out and same thing the second year -- same foot. Inside front left. He went to Ocala, showed, sound, then we came back to Houston and it cracks when he's turned out!

SOOOO a year and a half after the second crack, his foot finally looks fabulous and he is headed back to work. Lives in a steel bar shoe. But I am willing to do ANYTHING to keep this horse sound. His other 3 feet look fantastic. It's just the left front that isn't formed quite as well that has the problem. To look at his feet, even the bad one, look perfect. We have had two vets and two farriers say that there is NO reason this horse should have cracks. Breaks my heart.

He is on isoxuprine (sp?) and a hoof and bone supplement and I have a salve that I rub on his cornet band. Bar shoes. Hopefully it all works.

To the OP -- I agree TOTALLY with Addison -- there are two many good horses for sale with out problems. I wouldn't take the gamble on this one -- especially if you ever plan on reselling it because not many people will want to take a chance.

hollyhorse2000
Sep. 22, 2009, 02:07 PM
Can anyone talk more about Laminasaver in relation to quarter cracks?? Interesting topic (not to hijack)

Yes, the cost IS also something to consider. I have my horse in egg bars with frog pads and they have to be done every four to five weeks. That runs more than $200 a shoeing. That plus hoof supplement, so it's not cheap.

AHorseSomeDay
Sep. 22, 2009, 08:09 PM
The horse I bought has a crack but the vet said it isn't anything to worry about. You should go by what your vet thinks.

I am going to start my horse on Farrier's Formula.

Come Shine
Sep. 22, 2009, 08:40 PM
Look at the photos below of Harbour Town if you want poof of his jump.

That is so sad, poor guy. I remember reading the thread when you found him. Crossing my fingers that all will stay well.

Horseymama
Sep. 23, 2009, 12:51 AM
My best most favorite horse has a re-occurring quarter crack. Right now it is good, but it has to be monitored extremely carefully, and he has to be shod every 3.5 weeks (mostly just backing up the toe.) His quarter crack is a result of his conformation, which is basically a really upright angle to the coffin bone inside in his right front hoof, which causes stress on the quarters. He has actually never been lame on it, but it has been so bad in the past that it has bled and once he got an infection in it. I had to give him a lot of months off from riding for it to get better, and although he is a very good jumper, I do not jump him anymore.

Luckily it turns out that he has become a very talented and successful dressage horse, so at least he has something else to do!

I would personally not buy a horse I knew to have this problem. It is really hard to deal with!

Mango7
Sep. 23, 2009, 01:34 AM
Can anyone talk more about Laminasaver in relation to quarter cracks?? Interesting topic (not to hijack)



My farrier had recommended it after I tried supplements, such as Farrier's Formula, and other biotin products with no sign of improvement. It is made for horses that have foundered, or chro. But in my case I used it to help improve the cracks, and it's really strengthened his hoof wall. It's the only product that I've tried so far that's actually helped.

A pretty good description can be found at: http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.html?pgguid=cddaed1b-ad3a-401e-bc9b-428fdad8cdab

Best View
Sep. 23, 2009, 11:50 AM
RUN AWAY!!! FAR FAR AWAY!

We leased a horse that supposedly had a superficial qualrter crack... this was the worst experience of my life. The horse was never sound, we had to take him to Ian McKinlay several times to have it laced and also the 3 others he got during the period of the lease. I can PM you with more information but I agree with many posters, "there are far to many nice horses, especially ones that can do 3', than to deal with quarter cracks"

This cost of THOUSANDS of dollars, and in the end the horse was stil hurting.

Instant Karma
Sep. 23, 2009, 01:23 PM
Another vote to RUN AWAY here.