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View Full Version : To all you George Morris clinic alumni...



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Sep. 20, 2009, 08:44 PM
I am taking my first clinic with him in a few weeks and would like to know what faux pas I need to avoid. I can/will not change my hair color (blond) but I have also heard that he doesn't like vests. Are there any other things I should avoid?
I really want the clinic to be about my riding and my horse, not the attire of myself or my horse.

Any tips would be great. Thanks

Lucassb
Sep. 20, 2009, 08:48 PM
George cares about horsemanship and attention to detail. Horse and rider should be as well turned out as possible - meaning not necessarily expensive, but gleaming and in perfect order. Wear gloves, carry a stick and wear your (polished) spurs. Be able to explain your choice of tack.

George wants people who listen attentively and who will do what he asks; don't make the same mistake twice! Pay attention to the others in your group and learn from their mistakes. Be prepared to start each exercise and don't wait to be told, "Next!" ... Do your best to pay attention and give the exercises your best effort and you will be fine.

PicturePerfectPonies
Sep. 20, 2009, 08:57 PM
Wear spurs, carry a stick...don't need them? Too bad carry them anyways. I had eeeny tiny spurs and a pathetic stick when i went in mine, but i had it! My friend had a stopper and at one point GM borrowed a dressage whip from a spectator and made my friend use it the rest of the clinic. I also dressed like i was walking into an AA show. As did everyone else in my clinic and he commented positively on our turn out. I was blond when i did my clinic with him and he didn't say a thing about it. Make sure your stirrup leathers are even and numbered! I did my clinic with him at equine affaire in Columbus years ago and he kept yelling at the girls in the earlier clinic that day so i ran out and bought a new pair!

It was a VERY positive experience for me. I actually got a few compliments (including one where he told me my jumping position was exemplary...which resulted in me pulling a rail and almost blowing a lead change b/c i was so shocked! I have it on video and i guard that video with my life lol). He loved that my horse had an adjustable stride and that i actually RODE my lines. He liked that i adjusted the way i rode through a bending line to make the strides easier on my horse. He liked that when i did the bending line towards the gate i didn't ride it as straight so that my horse would still get the number of strides he wanted. Remember its not a show...he'd rather you ride effectively than prettily. I went in shaking like a leaf and came out with a huge smile on my face.

It was awesome watching him ride my friends' horses and more than anything I wanted him to get on mine, but he didn't.

Oh and i was told that he didn't like pelhams so i switched my bit before hand. However, 2 girls did ride with pelhams in our clinic and he didn't seem to have an issue with the bit but one of the girls was catch riding a horse and not familiar with the pelham. He was picky that she tended to get a little tight with her curb rein.

Make sure your horse will calmly trot poles. Mine would at home all day long, but he kept trying to hop over them in the clinic which he didn't like at all.

Danger'sDelight13
Sep. 20, 2009, 09:58 PM
He really wasn't that intense on turnout in my clinic, but everyone was neat. One girl had a show jacket on and he told her to take it off and that he didn't like jackets in his clinics. Ditto to what PPP said, always carry a stick and wear spurs. I had a great time, definitely worth the money and it was great watching him ride my mare.

Addison
Sep. 21, 2009, 08:34 AM
My best advice to you is to relax and plan to enjoy one of the best possible experiences in riding.

Your tack should be immaculate and well fitted. LUCASSB is very correct in stating that you should be able to explain your choice of tack for the horse you are riding. If you have flexible stirrups, get some traditional ones even if it just for the clinic. It's just not worth it.

Your clothing should be conservative in colour and fit. A polo tucked into your breeches with a plain black or brown is best. Do not overdress as he does not like it when a rider starts to peel their layers of clothing. I have ridden in his October clinics in Maryland and wear long sleeve polos so I could roll the sleeves up if I needed to.

George Morris does not expect you or your horse to be perfect. Above all you must pay attention to his directions given to you and every other rider in the ring. When he asks you to line up in a semi circle facing the auditors--do not walk--trot smartly into line up.

Do not talk to other riders or people outside the ring during the clinic.

I too am blonde but it did not seem to bother him ;)!!!

JinxyFish313
Sep. 21, 2009, 08:36 AM
I find it funny that people go to such great lengths to please this man. If your horse goes well and is comfortable in a particular bit, do really care that much about Mr. Morris' preference that you'd put him in something less useful and unfamiliar? Be neat, well equipped and ready to try your best at anything that may be asked of you....no different than any other clinic. Don't whine, don't zone-out, don't make him correct you multiple times for the same fault. These are principle that should be present in your regular lessons though, nothing special.

BK to some
Sep. 21, 2009, 08:42 AM
good for you!!! it will be fun. go in prepared for the things you know he will say.

oh! no bendy stirrup irons, use the traditional stainless steal ones.

don't pet your horse excessively ("this is not a love fest! this is not woodstock! don't pet your horse!" - gm)

crop and spurs,

look fantastic.

bring some extra bits, he may ask you to switch to a different kind for day two. if you don't have what he asks for, ask around, maybe someone does.

just do what he says!!!
i got so much out of what he said to the other riders too. i kinda knew what he would say to me already......hehe.

if you have auditors, tell them the be quiet!!!

hunter-eventer-hunter
Sep. 21, 2009, 08:48 AM
For all of his oddities (and there are a lot) he is a great teacher.

You will have fun. Be tidy in your dress and tack.

Make sure the horse is SUPER CLEAN and TIDY.

Ditto on the crop and spurs. Clean the boots super well, the bottoms too.

But have fun, he isn't nearly as crazed about the T/O as he used to be. More focused on the riding.

Don't be afraid to take a chance on a line. The last clinic I audited with him he sort of went off on a local successful Eq Princess becuase when he set up a line with no ground line and a really odd stride (you had to choose to ride long or deep into to it, and then ride the combo accordingly) she had NO idea what to do. Just kept dumping the horse at take off because she had no idea how to gallop or hold.

You would have thought hand gallop once he explained it to her had come from the moon.

Renn/aissance
Sep. 21, 2009, 08:49 AM
I really want the clinic to be about my riding and my horse, not the attire of myself or my horse.

Dress neatly and appropriately in a collared shirt or nice sweater, breeches, and polished boots; tuck your hair up under your helmet; wear gloves; make sure your horse is groomed to within an inch of his life; carry stick and spurs. Really, that's it. He is not a hunter princess who is going to tell you that the polo shirt with the sunbleached shoulders is sooooo five years ago. Be neat, clean, and ready to learn and you will be just fine. Have fun!

MistyBlue
Sep. 21, 2009, 09:18 AM
Yup, make sure shirt has collar and isn't neon colored. Tuck it in, plain belt. And tuck it in well, not bloused over the waist of your britches...he wants to see how your body is moving.
Shine your boots...wipe them off right before entering ring.
Crop and spurs most definitely. Because if he thinks you might benefit from using either and yoou don't already have them, it's a pita holding up the class.
Don't make the mistakes other pople make, pay attention to everything.
Don't say, "I/my horse can't do that." :no:
I never noticed him having an issue with blonde hair...if you're properly turned out he won't see your hair anyways. ;)
Tack immaculate...seriously. (horse too obviously) Tack clean and well conditioned...he's not a fan of people in brand new stiff or waxy saddles in his clinics.
Just listen, relax and know that you *can* do whatever he tells you to do. And definitely relax, if you're nervous you'll be stiff. Your horse will react to that too. He's not an ogre...not even close. Not even back in his younger "piss and vinegar" years. And he's witty as heck with a dry hilarious sense of humor. And literally a wealth of *easy to absorb* knowledge. That's the kicker with his clinics...he covers everything from warming up to facing issues to cooling off...all in ways you improve and learn and that most people easily understand.

Maya01
Sep. 21, 2009, 10:09 AM
I find it funny that people go to such great lengths to please this man. If your horse goes well and is comfortable in a particular bit, do really care that much about Mr. Morris' preference that you'd put him in something less useful and unfamiliar?

I'm pretty sure that they should just go along with the GM preferences for his clinics, since your there to learn to ride, not have a lecture on the negatives of such equipment. It is good to please the chef d'equipe! :lol:

JinxyFish313
Sep. 21, 2009, 10:22 AM
Surely the chef d'equipe knows its important to use what works well for the horse. Why would you pre-emptively change it to something else just because you heard he doesn't like your bit? At least wait for him to SEE your horse go in it.

justblu
Sep. 21, 2009, 12:17 PM
Is it worth doing a clinic with him if you don't have your changes down? My pony was affordable because she can't/won't do lead changes. This isn't a problem for an event horse, but will GM be upset if I do simple changes. The rest of her flatwork is improving quickly and she can do leg yield, turn on the forehand, turn on the haunches, and has an adjustable stride. I would like to do a 3 foot clinic with him in Dec, but dont want to hold anybody up over this issue.

PicturePerfectPonies
Sep. 21, 2009, 12:42 PM
Surely the chef d'equipe knows its important to use what works well for the horse. Why would you pre-emptively change it to something else just because you heard he doesn't like your bit? At least wait for him to SEE your horse go in it.

I switched my bit when i rode in his clinic, it wasn't a big deal, I just jumped in the bit i usually rode the hacks in. My horse knew the bit, did fine...it really wasn't a big deal. I was there to learn how to improve my riding. If he could give me tips to make my horse jump around like a quiet hunter in a bit he usually gets strong in then YAY! My horse ended up being a super star, only getting strong through lead changes (which he tended to do no matter what the bit)

Ethalo2
Sep. 21, 2009, 01:31 PM
Everything above plus...hair color doesn't matter but neatness does. When I was in his clinic he sent 2 girls out of the ring to re-do their hair because it was hanging down in a pony tail.....up under the helmet ALWAYS.

In the Air
Sep. 21, 2009, 02:03 PM
Is it worth doing a clinic with him if you don't have your changes down? My pony was affordable because she can't/won't do lead changes. This isn't a problem for an event horse, but will GM be upset if I do simple changes. The rest of her flatwork is improving quickly and she can do leg yield, turn on the forehand, turn on the haunches, and has an adjustable stride. I would like to do a 3 foot clinic with him in Dec, but dont want to hold anybody up over this issue.

He may just get on and fix the changes for you.:yes:

zahena
Sep. 21, 2009, 02:15 PM
He was actually maybe TOO nice here in Dallas (tyler) when he was here. He really wants to see someone WORK for it. Not just poke around and learn what you can. He did tease the one blond in one class but he told her how much he liked her horse. I thought he was very easy going but maybe we just got him on a nice day???

Just follow the advice here and you'll do well. Don't get too nervous or that could really make your first day long. Be honest with yourself and your horses' abilities and you'll do fine.

tarheelmd07
Sep. 21, 2009, 02:18 PM
He may just get on and fix the changes for you.:yes:

I'm riding in the October clinic at Morven...I'd love for him to get on my horse and fix his changes ;) We're primarily eventers...so we usually just get ours over the fence...but I'd love some help in improving his changes! He does them...reluctantly.

harveyhorses
Sep. 21, 2009, 02:29 PM
Surely the chef d'equipe knows its important to use what works well for the horse. Why would you pre-emptively change it to something else just because you heard he doesn't like your bit? At least wait for him to SEE your horse go in it.


I think the point is being able to EXPLAIN why you use it, not just because it is 'tack of the day'. If he could make my horse go better in a simpler bit, you bet I'd change.

RolyPolyPony
Sep. 21, 2009, 02:37 PM
I am taking my first clinic with him in a few weeks and would like to know what faux pas I need to avoid. I can/will not change my hair color (blond) but I have also heard that he doesn't like vests.

Ok, not to derail this, but what is this w/ GM and blondes?!

/confused

faraway46
Sep. 21, 2009, 04:14 PM
Don't ever, ever make up excuses! "Oh, my horse does this because he is so and so...". Listen, ask questions about his directions and just do it (or at least try your best), but never excuse yourself of doing something or blame the horse. I am sure he can tell what the horse is doing wrong, believe me he doesn't need you to tell him the reason why he is doing it. I'm sure, just by watching, he knows what needs to be done to solve the issue. If he sees you are not the problem or the solution is past your abilities, he might get on your horse, but the psycological past of the equine or rider are of no importance to him...;).
Other than that, detailed neatness, punctuality, concentration and profesionalism is all he requires (plus a crop and spurs ;) ).
Relax and you're going to have a blast! It's a tremendous learning experience!
Good luck!
Viv

Duckz
Sep. 21, 2009, 04:23 PM
Ok, not to derail this, but what is this w/ GM and blondes?!

/confused

GM has a reputation for teasing blondes...the whole dumb blonde thing I guess.

Renn/aissance
Sep. 21, 2009, 05:50 PM
GM has a reputation for teasing blondes...the whole dumb blonde thing I guess.

Not that he isn't absolutely equal opportunity about saying something to a brunette or a redhead who is acting their shoe size rather than their age, mind!

RolyPolyPony
Sep. 21, 2009, 05:52 PM
GM has a reputation for teasing blondes...the whole dumb blonde thing I guess.


Ahhhhhhh! Thanks for clarifying :) Silly GM!

Lucassb
Sep. 21, 2009, 07:12 PM
One other suggestion - try to read (or re-read) his book before doing the clinic. He will expect you to know the material in it (ex, how many mph is the trot? the canter?)

It will give you an outline of his philosophy and basic principles he will cover in his lessons; his exercises tend to be about prompt response to the aids, regulating the rider's body angles, and planning ahead.

You can also do a search on here for previous GM clinic reports - there have been some very extensive ones in the fairly recent past, and they will help give you a sense of what to expect.

Have fun - GM clinics are fantastic and you are lucky to have the opportunity!

snaffle635
Sep. 21, 2009, 08:31 PM
Not GM, but Ray Texel (who rode with George) recently chastised a rider at EAP II for having his stirrup leathers on the last hole. Ray said never have any of your tack on the last hole.

Ray hopped on the kid's horse and needed to shorten the stirrups, which he couldn't easily do because they were on the shortest hole. He had to get off and wrap the leathers around the stirrup to get them short enough.

I thought that was rather good advice.

SkipChange
Sep. 21, 2009, 08:53 PM
Not GM, but Ray Texel (who rode with George) recently chastised a rider at EAP II for having his stirrup leathers on the last hole. Ray said never have any of your tack on the last hole.

Ray hopped on the kid's horse and needed to shorten the stirrups, which he couldn't easily do because they were on the shortest hole. He had to get off and wrap the leathers around the stirrup to get them short enough.

I thought that was rather good advice.

Yes, that's one of those Pony Club rules that has a reason. The require an extra hole above and below on EVERY buckle for a reason. You may need to adjust, you may rip out a hole, you never know!

I would be scared that I might get in trouble for having stirrups that are too short. I ride in kids size 42" leathers because I'm only 5'2" My trainer has dealt with it when she has to hop on, but she always laughs at me. Of course I think I would be more concerned with my riding abilities at this point...I desperately want to ride with GM one day, just want to get to a presentable state with my new horse first :D

Heineken
Sep. 21, 2009, 09:58 PM
My horse has been 2x and I rode once and audited once. Best times of my life. Don't wait for your horse to be "presentable", I took my barely-a-year-off the track horse 2 years ago and it was an amazing experience. Last year my old trainer's 13 year old daughter took my still green horse and GM rode him a bunch and loved him. Just look neat and stay organized and you'll be fine! It's a blast.

CrossWinds81
Sep. 21, 2009, 10:39 PM
This will be an absolute no-brainer, but...NEVER, EVER, EVER ask for a leg up from The Master Himself! Yes, that's right! :no::eek::lol::eek::no:... This was actually a Trainer's Clinic, and we were demo riders for a 3-day clinic...15 years ago...EEPS!!! My junior years! lol Anyhow, the first day of the clinic George rode 2 of our horses (rode all of them by the end of the clinic). Someone in our clinic actually asked for a leg up from GM after he dismounted and returned the horse to the rider. This woman happened to also be quite overweight as well, and we literally sat there for 30 min while he discussed self discipline and overweight riders...I cannot say that I disagree with his position on the topic, however, 30 min is a bit overkill...PLEASE do not put yourself into a position such as this...I don't think you will, and certainly not after all of the good advice given by others.

definitely carry a stick...I did not wear spurs, because the HOT TB jumper mare I was riding would go crazy if I did, but I had someone in the audience hold onto them for me just in case...if your horse tolerates them, wear them...but again, the horsemanship aspect...if they drive your horse crazy, that is a form of not paying attention. Though, others may say you should be able to ride and not use them, if your leg is not trained to ride with them, you aren't helping your case.

Scrub, oil, condition, and scrub some more...tack should be very clean, buckles and bits shining...but NO BLING! (think, conservative white pad, dark polos or leather open front boots, plain show tack...no swarovsky crystals!) :0)

BE ON TIME...that should go without saying, but we had to wait a couple minutes for one of our riders on day one...that did not go over well.

Enjoy the clinic, listen with an open mind, do the exercises precisely as he says to do them, and prepare to learn a lot. You might get a short quip here and there, but trainers are not here to coddle, they are there to teach and point out what needs improving, what could be changed. ENJOY!!! Wish I could attend! :O)

WorthTheWait95
Sep. 21, 2009, 11:24 PM
Not GM, but Ray Texel (who rode with George) recently chastised a rider at EAP II for having his stirrup leathers on the last hole. Ray said never have any of your tack on the last hole.

Ray hopped on the kid's horse and needed to shorten the stirrups, which he couldn't easily do because they were on the shortest hole. He had to get off and wrap the leathers around the stirrup to get them short enough.

I thought that was rather good advice.

Along the sames lines make sure your girth is on a higher hole on the right then the left. I got in trouble once on a bloater because after I mounted I had to tighten my girth another three holes so it was higher on the near then off side. That was back when I was training with him and not in a clinic but he has been known to check stuff like that during the initial talk on day one.

Just go in with an open mind and willingness to listen and try your hardest and you'll be just fine. He's great guy and a fabulous teacher. I've always found him to be humorous more then scary. All of his big wind blowing speeches usually have a joke or two in them and he has a great sense of humor. Just DON'T smile when something is going wrong even if he does crack a joke. He wants to know that you're serious and focused on the task at hand!

Make sure you have steady, unwavering eye contact whenever he is speaking to you as well. I started riding with him as a pretty shy young teen and that was one of the major things he always harped on me for. I've seen others called on it as well in various clinics over the years.

Some other q's he likes to quiz clinic participants on are things like 'name the three main bones in a horses foot' (he wants to hear coffin, short pastern and long pastern just FYI...he didn't love my answer of P1,P2 and P3). He has asked me things like 'explain the three tracks of a shoulder in/out' or how to properly ask for a canter (INSIDE leg, outside rein!). Things of that nature.

Also I guess I should feel special? GM has given me two or three legs in the past...usually after an unfortunate dismount :lol:. Of course I was all of 4'11" at the time and on a 17hh+ horse! They were offered though, not requested!

CrossWinds81
Sep. 22, 2009, 12:32 AM
Also I guess I should feel special? GM has given me two or three legs in the past...usually after an unfortunate dismount :lol:. Of course I was all of 4'11" at the time and on a 17hh+ horse! They were offered though, not requested!


Lucky you! I'm guessing you were also less than 250 lbs? :winkgrin:

Addison
Sep. 22, 2009, 06:58 AM
The funny thing about "the blonde thing" is that at least one of his most successful students has gone on to deliver the same kind of "bullets" in her clinics. Anne Kursinski zeroed in on a couple of blondes when I attended a clinic of hers back in the 90s. Her comments were not truly mean but she was entertaining.

Nickelodian
Sep. 22, 2009, 09:55 AM
When given instructions, listen carefully and try your best. If you're asked to add up down the line and leave out going away, make an OBVIOUS effort. Even if you don't succeed, showing that you're trying goes a long way.

Rio Blanco
Sep. 22, 2009, 12:21 PM
I would second reading his book before the clinic. I learned a lot by just watching his clinic while my trainers were riding a couple customer's greener jumpers. Make sure your and your horse are groomed/dressed to the nines, and your tack as well, and no bendy stirrups or those black royal riders stirrups.

He made a comment about my boots not being clean (uhh, I was grooming that day and I swear I polished them before I came down to the ring with the horses... I just couldn't avoid the slop in the warm up ring?) and I also had the pleasure of being subject of his "get up with me in the morning little girl and I will run you ragged" (okay so I'm short and stumpy, but I'm not THAT stumpy!). I'm considering getting up the balls to ride my mare with him next year.

JWB
Sep. 22, 2009, 12:45 PM
Be very well turned out.
If your crop has a loop on it, cut it off or he'll break it off... Also remember that you SHOULD carry a crop in any color you want as long as it's black.

Put your blonde hair in a hairnet.

Solid color shirt, tucked in with a simple, bling-free belt....

Speedy
Sep. 22, 2009, 01:50 PM
I rode with him last fall for 3 days. I think you'll have a great time if you remember to do what he says when he says it, look him in the eye when he speaks to you, ride like you mean it and have a sense of humor about yourself.

You don't know everything there is to know, or you wouldn't have a lesson with him in the first place, so don't let yourself get all stressed out if he expresses some criticism - he is very nice, but will be critical of something, inevitably - learn from it, don't obsess about it.

I was actually quite surprised by how generous he was with the various types of people riding in my group each day, and didn't think the exercises were very challenging. Fun to do, and certainly worthwhile, but nothing ground breaking. It was the feedback from him - positive and negative - that made the experience worthwhile.

I will admit to feeling great relief that he didn't immediately mark me as the eventer that I am and castigate me for my tack and appearance. It's fair to say that I was his fav in that regard (used as a shining example of all that is good), and, honestly, I was pretty darn shocked by that! It was really hard to focus on my riding after he lovingly rubbed my shining, HEAVY, solid, unbendy metal stirrup, gently removed my toe and held it up as a model for everyone to admire :)

Renn/aissance
Sep. 22, 2009, 02:16 PM
If your crop has a loop on it, cut it off or he'll break it off... Also remember that you SHOULD carry a crop in any color you want as long as it's black.

Or brown! Basically as long as you can't see it on a bay horse from twenty feet away and it doesn't sparkle. ;)

The first year I took a clinic with him he was about to break the loop off of my crop until I told him, "Actually, that IS the crop I take cross country" (so it had a reason to have a loop.) The next year I brought my short leather jumping bat with no loop, and all was well. :)

PicturePerfectPonies
Sep. 22, 2009, 02:29 PM
My horse has been 2x and I rode once and audited once. Best times of my life. Don't wait for your horse to be "presentable", I took my barely-a-year-off the track horse 2 years ago and it was an amazing experience. Last year my old trainer's 13 year old daughter took my still green horse and GM rode him a bunch and loved him. Just look neat and stay organized and you'll be fine! It's a blast.

On top of that don't think you have to have a 17hh warmblood either. He couldn't say enough nice things about my friends 15hh appy (with no spots). The little guy had a huge stride and a nice jump, he was also extremely well trained. Even though he was down hill, would rather have been napping, and a had a little short neck GM kept telling his owner how sharp he was.

Parker_Rider
Sep. 22, 2009, 03:59 PM
Oh have fun! Everyone else covered most of it (cleanliness cleanliness cleanliness! "It's a sanitation issue for you and your horse!") but he really enjoys teaching students. One girl in our group thought she was God's gift and you can guess how much GM loved her... I am by no means a great rider, and wasn't the best rider in our group by a long shot, but I got a lot of compliments and afterwards was told I was a "perfect student" because I paid attention ("yes sir, no sir") and tried until I thought I was going to pass out (literally my vision started to go black..) to do what he wanted.

I got so much out of his clinic (3 days) that I didn't want him to go, lol. He's calmed down in his older years - Wilson Dennehey was there and they talked about how tough they used to be... gone from "tigers to pussy cats" :lol:

Have fun and learn lots! He's a wonderful wonderful teacher and absolutely hilarious too!

GotSpots
Sep. 22, 2009, 04:32 PM
There are often a number of eventers in the Morven clinic. I rode there with him two years ago on my prelim horse; my coach took her advanced horse. No, you don't have to have a perfect lead change, but at least try for it (and expect that he will want you to school for a correct change, rather than just lean to the inside and race around). Be very comfortable switching your crop from inside to outside hand, and particularly if your horse doesn't have a good change (mine didn't at the time), be ready to do that so you can (correctly) back up a request for the change with the stick.

The other thing I would say is do whatever it is he asks quickly and try to do it right. It may not be something that will necessarily be successful with your horse, but give it a chance before you say no - if you try and it's not a good fit, he'll switch the exercise, but it might just surprise you.

We wore polos and were fine - it can get quite warm in that indoor. Be prepared to do a good deal of standing around - we had 8 in our lesson which meant there was a good deal of waiting (though all still quite interesting).

JinxyFish313
Sep. 22, 2009, 04:34 PM
^I think I might audit @ Morven next month just to see if he really has mellowed ;)

DancingQueen
Sep. 22, 2009, 10:03 PM
Make sure you have enough holes both in your stirrups and on your bridle to go up or down a few. Bit/noseband etc should never be on the last hole. Neither should your stirrups.

Have fun!

tidy rabbit
Apr. 14, 2010, 02:09 PM
Oh boy... let's see....

There is absolutely no way you can be 100% prepared..... absolutely no way.

As an example, last week he asked a woman what is the difference between "looking" and "seeing"?

Care to take a guess at this one? Anyone.... I hate to give it away before you have a chance to try to answer it correctly.

Know which seats are safe and which is dangerous.... behind the motion and with the motion is safe, ahead of the motion is dangerous.

Sign up for the group YOU KNOW you will be successful in, don't put your horse in the high group if you max out at 3'6".

Don't point at the jumps. Don't pet your horse.
DO NOT let your horse sniff him should when he walks up along side of you to talk about tack etc.
Don't talk too much should he ask you a question, do your best to answer very concisely.

Sit up tall and proud on your horse, don't sit in the semicircle like a slob, or like you're on your couch at home.

Any preconceptions you have about it will be wrong, so just have fun, enjoy and let your riding speak for itself.

Parker_Rider
Apr. 14, 2010, 06:29 PM
Be a good student, follow orders make eye contact when he's speaking to you (or otherwise indicate your attentiveness), yes sir, no sir, and say your please and thank yous.

And under no circumstance point with your crop.

He doesn't care if you're perfect (If Anne Kurzinski is average to him, trust me, you're average to him too ;) ) just that you try and listen.

Also, if you can figure out what exactly a "soup sandwich" is, please PM me and let me know. :)

Jaegermonster
Apr. 14, 2010, 06:57 PM
PM sent LOL

Alterrain
Apr. 14, 2010, 11:01 PM
question for tidy rabbit, or for anyone else that has done this:

I have always been curious about threads like this that are so dead and buried and then pop back up. How did you think to respond to this thread since it was not on (or even close to) the first page? Did something trigger your memory and you searched for it, or is there some setting that highlights it? (like an ebay-type Watch This Item)

TIA!

lauriep
Apr. 14, 2010, 11:21 PM
Surely the chef d'equipe knows its important to use what works well for the horse. Why would you pre-emptively change it to something else just because you heard he doesn't like your bit? At least wait for him to SEE your horse go in it.

He likes simple, uncomplicated tack, and he'll teach you to ride with it.

He'll change it for you if he feels it is not appropriate. And, once your horse is really between your hand and leg and LISTENING to you, chances are you will need less bit.

This man has an uncanny ability to see a problem and correct it in zippo time, if the rider is listening and able to do what he says.

Fun Size
Apr. 15, 2010, 12:05 AM
I sometimes bring up old threads, if it is something I am interested in or missed the first time around. You can find these when you search for something, or sometimes I just read old posts from time periods when I wasn't really online :D

mustangsal85
Apr. 15, 2010, 01:16 AM
I am so jealous!! I want to do a clinic with him so badly. Ugh. I hate living in Missouri.

my_doran
Apr. 15, 2010, 01:34 AM
same for me too mustangsal85...sorry to say but i think the guy will literally not be around,by the time i get an amazing opputunity like that audit/or ride....he doesn't come to canada very often..last time he was here was at the MANE EVENT expo.
love to do a clinic with him b/c of his success with riders and his was of teaching discipline in our riding.

anyways
have fun at the clinic.

tidy rabbit
Apr. 15, 2010, 07:11 AM
question for tidy rabbit, or for anyone else that has done this:

Gosh, I didn't even notice it was old. It came up on my first page when looking at "New Posts" weird.