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Touch~of~Gold
Sep. 20, 2009, 04:50 PM
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JA
Sep. 20, 2009, 05:24 PM
Horses and ponies are NOT investments or ways to make money! The only people who may make money are those who own their own farm! Lets say you bought a 10k pony and kept it for a year, showing it 2x per month at the A shows (about 1500 per show) by the end of the year you will have about $60,000 into that 10k pony! And if you include Florida you are easily looking at another 20k added to what you have in the pony. You would have to sell it for $75,000 and in this economy that is not going to happen easily. Take the money you would put into a pony and go to graduate school!

spmoonie
Sep. 20, 2009, 05:34 PM
Sorry, I dont really have much advice. I just wanted to say that this is something I have always wanted to do as well (except on a lower scale). Good luck! I hope it works out! :D

findeight
Sep. 20, 2009, 06:23 PM
If you are specifically doing this to make money for a horse?

Don't do it.

Green Ponies are cheap right now but having to pay the freight on one at, say, 1200 a month (board, vet, farrier but not including shows)? That takes your 10k Green Pony to a still Green 17k+ Pony in 6 months. Take it to WEF under a trainers guidance and pay the expenses/travel/entry fees/stall etc. for the Pony and rider? No way you'll get out for under 5k a month on that, stay for 8 weeks and you'll have a 27k+ still Green Pony.

You want to get that 27k overhead out and make some more for a good show horse prospect? Talking about 50k or so and up as a sale price. More every week you keep it.

The market is for packers with proven show records. Can you be sure that your Pony will quickly learn to pack that small child rider? Do you have the contacts for a really good Pony jock with a good reputation to be your regular rider? Have you or your trainer been selling horses or Ponies in that price range and do you know or have contacts that will spend that?

What if it does not do well in the shows? Needs a better rider then the average buyer child? And it comes back from Florida continuing to rack up 1200 a month?

If you need that sale money to get a horse? Put the 10k purchase price plus 1200 a month in the bank for a year and go find a nice Green horse for yourself.

The Ponies that sell high are pretty made and presented by trainers who specialize in them ridden by real Pony jocks that ride almost exclusively for them and they are big winners...and they STILL are hard to sell.

ilmjumper
Sep. 20, 2009, 06:25 PM
Eh, i got a FREE pony last winter, that's really well bred, pretty cute mover, really nice little jumper, super cute with lots of chrome, and haven't gotten any real interest in her. Course, I'm not in a pony meca so things might be different in a better pony area!

JA
Sep. 20, 2009, 06:33 PM
And don't forget you will have to pay your trainer at least a 10-15% commission on the pony's sale price!

findeight
Sep. 20, 2009, 06:39 PM
Oops, forgot that commission issue that will reduce your profit...and you do need a good agent to sell one at a higher price unless you actually have done so yourself and know a pool of willing buyers at that price.

Montanas_Girl
Sep. 20, 2009, 06:46 PM
I bought an "investment" pony in college and made a tidy profit on him, but I wasn't working on the scale you're talking about.

My trainer in TN has a horse dealer connection in Lexington, KY who buys cheap trail/games/etc. horses at auction. When he comes across a decent one, he calls us. She knew I was looking for a pony, so when he called about one he'd found, we jumped on it.

Kody was a 13.1 hand Mustang gelding (BLM brand and all!), around 10-12 years old, plain brown wrapper, etc. He was decently put together and broke to death. I paid $350 for him, including shipping to TN. I pulled his mane, clipped him, and taught him to jump. He didn't need grain or shoes, and he lived on pasture, so my total cost to keep him - including vet, farrier, and board - was about $125/month. I kept him for three months and then started advertising him on Dreamhorse and Equine.com. Within 48 hours, a trainer I knew with a large lesson program came out to try him. She bought him from me for $1,800 as a lesson pony. I'd take on another project like him in a heartbeat!

So, yes, you can make money on the right pony. But you have to know what you are looking for, be willing to take a chance on a "diamond in the rough", and have the resources to maintain the pony as cheaply as possible.

sansibar
Sep. 20, 2009, 06:56 PM
I just got one two weeks ago we already have some people wanting to come see her :) she is a wicked been there done that pony that simply became unwanted. and boy can she jump!! :D I'm in uni now so I don't ride her always, I have other people hop on her, and she will be moving closer to me soon and we'll be getting some kid to campaign her in the mediums until she sells :)

Mind you I am currently paying $150 a month to keep the pony where she is and when she moves it will be $450 a month

here are photos of her :D
poppy 1 (http://photos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs228.snc1/7520_281776925313_500990313_8874866_1537749_n.jpg)
poppy 2 (http://photos-f.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs208.snc1/7520_281733315313_500990313_8873581_350593_n.jpg)

Couture TB
Sep. 20, 2009, 07:26 PM
Sansibar- Did that pony come from NY? Looks like a pony I worked with about 6 years ago.

As for the making a profit on a sales horse/pony. Yes you can. But the more money you stick into the pony the more money you need to get out of the pony. Also remember the market is not what it use to be. Yes horses are still selling, BUT most of those are been there done that or beyond fancy.

I currently have a 5yr 12h Welsh cross that has done local shows, been used in a lesson program, clean jumper with nice form. All he is missing is his lead changes. No takers. He is not even priced really high. But here is the thing. He is at the stable that I train out of that is a private facility owned by the woman who I own horses with (including him) so he doesn't really cost much a month. It does not matter to us if he sells. That is the big question you have to ask: Will I be in trouble money wise if this pony is a dud? Would I be better puting money away for a horse later? Or if you have $10,000 to spend why not try to find a nice fancy young hunter prospect for yourself right now? Cut out the middle part?

Picture of pony for example http://i297.photobucket.com/albums/mm205/MattsonTraining/Nico.jpg

ponymom64
Sep. 20, 2009, 07:40 PM
It can be done but it is hard if you have to board the pony out and pay for training. We have a small pony that we got last year and she is the real deal, beautiful, adorable mover and gorgeous jump and sweet sweet to boot. The whole package! We are lucky because she just fell in our lap, we own our own farm and my DD has done most of the work on her, so we don't have a lot of overhead but the market is still soft and while I would love for her to sell now, it is likely that we will have to keep her for a while longer and campaign her in the greens.

I think if have to pay a lot for your prospect and then pay for board and training, your margins will be very tight. You would be better off trying to find a nice green horse for your 10K and then making it up - then you won't have the pressure of having to sell the pony to buy the horse. Somehow, that plan never seems to work the way it is supposed to. I totally know that from experience......

sansibar
Sep. 20, 2009, 07:41 PM
Sansibar- Did that pony come from NY? Looks like a pony I worked with about 6 years ago.

As for the making a profit on a sales horse/pony. Yes you can. But the more money you stick into the pony the more money you need to get out of the pony. Also remember the market is not what it use to be. Yes horses are still selling, BUT most of those are been there done that or beyond fancy.

I currently have a 5yr 12h Welsh cross that has done local shows, been used in a lesson program, clean jumper with nice form. All he is missing is his lead changes. No takers. He is not even priced really high. But here is the thing. He is at the stable that I train out of that is a private facility owned by the woman who I own horses with (including him) so he doesn't really cost much a month. It does not matter to us if he sells. That is the big question you have to ask: Will I be in trouble money wise if this pony is a dud? Would I be better puting money away for a horse later? Or if you have $10,000 to spend why not try to find a nice fancy young hunter prospect for yourself right now? Cut out the middle part?

Picture of pony for example http://i297.photobucket.com/albums/mm205/MattsonTraining/Nico.jpg

I have no idea I am trying to find some information on her history all I know is that she was called lulu before her old owners had her, she is about 12, and when i say been there done that i mean it! she is auto changes (she just needs to be refreshed and put into shape), she has shown and won a lot, but thats all I really know.

SkipChange
Sep. 20, 2009, 07:57 PM
Hate to be a debbie-downer but...I got a free pony, thought I might at least break even training and re-selling. Think again. Not even close. Think about it, one vet bill can blow your whole plan. What if the pony goes unsound and is no longer rideable?

To make it work you're going to need to turn the pony over VERY quickly. Unless you get free board and free shows or something crazy like that.

PicturePerfectPonies
Sep. 20, 2009, 08:24 PM
I do it all the time! But I've found the only way to make money is to keep it small. NEVER turn down an offer that = profit (unless its a really sketchy home of course). I bought one pony for $75 b/c no one could stay on her. After i switched the double twisted wire they had on her to a loose ring and taught her no one would yank on her face she stopped bolting. Sold her 3 months later for $2000. I paid $425 for a large and sold her 2 years later for $4000. Right now I'm sitting on a small that i paid $350 for. He's now jumping around, has a lead change, trail rides, and is beginner safe. I think I'm keeping this one for my son though.

However, paying $1060/month in board is NOT going to make you a profit. If you think you can increase the ponies value by over $1000 every month then go for it...but that is highly highly unlikely.

Right now i pay $50 in board, my small gets a handful of grain each day, and stays tick fat on cheap grass hay. He's barefoot and only needs trimmed every 8 weeks or so. If i get a hard keeper in they get sold quick before i sink too much into them (ex. my midget TB i just sold. She is tough to keep in the winter, so i took $400 over what i paid for her so i didn't have to pour feed down her throat all winter).

For every pony i made a decent amount on there was one i lost a bunch on.

Honestly i think you should do it though (if you're not dependent on a profit to survive). Its just flat out fun! Ponies have heaps of personality and always find ways to surprise you. I bought my first pony b/c she was dirt cheap and I wanted something to just trail ride on. Since then I've only bought 1 horse! Ponies are like potato chips, you can't just have one.

woweezowee
Sep. 20, 2009, 08:26 PM
I agree with what's said above... as my trainer said today, "if you want to make a million dollars in the horse business, invest 2 million."

AKA... it is nearly impossible to MAKE money, difficult enough to break even. I have owned/boarded/ridden/shown 5+ ponies and never made money... only when I counted the board as a cost I would have spent anyway, did I "make" money, and never when counting shows/board/farrier/vet. (=when you sell a house, you never factor in the necessary costs you would spend no matter which house (electricity, water))

Not trying to discourage because it's always tempting if you find a good, reasonably priced prospect, but it is tough to pull it off and even tougher in this economy where, as said above, show masters with records to boot are selling for well below what they should be (15-20k instead of 40k).

Girlsdosk8
Sep. 20, 2009, 08:38 PM
If you figure out how to make a profit with those kind of expenses, please let me know!

I do that on the side, really for fun, and if I break even I am ecstatic. I can board mine for around $350 a month, but it is everything else that adds up quickly. When you start asking $15K or more people normally want show miles which is $$$

At the same time, I find the ponies incredibly rewarding! They are my passion and I wouldn't want to do anything else. Just don't expect to get back what you put in. It takes a top quality animal, a good trainer, pony jock and some luck.

Windswept Stable
Sep. 20, 2009, 09:02 PM
Has anyone on COTH ever experienced buying, training, and selling a pony to make a profit? After college, I am thinking about buying a young, green, medium sized pony, training it, possibly finding a junior rider to show it in the pony hunter/equitation classes, and then selling it for more than what I bought it for. I am hoping to use the money I make selling the pony to buy a young, new horse that I can show in the big time hunters with:yes:

I know it sounds crazy, but I would love to give it a try. Over the summer I rode 2 green ponies for a trainer who was doing the same thing that I want to do:)

I am hoping to buy the pony for 10K or less, pony board at the barn I will keep the pony at is $1060 a month, including 1 private lesson/hack by the trainer a week(the trainer at this barn is a big time hunter rider), I will pay all expenses for a Junior rider to ride it at A and AA shows, and the barn I will be riding with shows in Florida in the winter, I will send the pony to Florida depending on how good it's doing:D If anyone has any comments or stories, please share them, I need as much advice as possible:yes:

Wake up-- you are not in Kansas anymore.

Couture TB
Sep. 20, 2009, 09:07 PM
I do it all the time! But I've found the only way to make money is to keep it small. NEVER turn down an offer that = profit (unless its a really sketchy home of course). I bought one pony for $75 b/c no one could stay on her. After i switched the double twisted wire they had on her to a loose ring and taught her no one would yank on her face she stopped bolting. Sold her 3 months later for $2000. I paid $425 for a large and sold her 2 years later for $4000. Right now I'm sitting on a small that i paid $350 for. He's now jumping around, has a lead change, trail rides, and is beginner safe. I think I'm keeping this one for my son though.

However, paying $1060/month in board is NOT going to make you a profit. If you think you can increase the ponies value by over $1000 every month then go for it...but that is highly highly unlikely.

Right now i pay $50 in board, my small gets a handful of grain each day, and stays tick fat on cheap grass hay. He's barefoot and only needs trimmed every 8 weeks or so. If i get a hard keeper in they get sold quick before i sink too much into them (ex. my midget TB i just sold. She is tough to keep in the winter, so i took $400 over what i paid for her so i didn't have to pour feed down her throat all winter).

For every pony i made a decent amount on there was one i lost a bunch on.



And that is it in a nutshell. We did the same thing with a 13.1h Welsh cross mare. She had gotten into to many bad habbits with her former rider (chid) and no adults were small enough to ride her. Picked her up for $600 stuck about another $700 into her and sold her 4 a little over 4 months later for $4,000 after all her problems were fixed. But we put minimal time into her, do all the farrier work, it is just the cost of feed, and small purchase price

Now at the same time we purchased that mare we purchased another small pony. Could jump the moon. BUT his little brain was fried. Couldn't make him into a safe child's pony. Sold him as a driving pony.

2foals
Sep. 20, 2009, 09:19 PM
When I was a kid we did this fairly successfully, but only because we looked around and bought cute & athletic ponies VERY cheaply out of people's backyards and then kept them at home (minimal expenses--worming, shots, farrier, no board bills) and then showed them locally and resold them. Some turned out fancy and sold for more, others were just solid citizens who were worth something because they had some training and experience. Let me emphasize that the money did NOT add up to enough to buy a fancy young horse, but it helped pay for our other horses' expenses, and was enough that over time we were able to buy increasingly nicer horses to start with.

I think your current business plan is flawed, because while you MIGHT chance upon a pony prospect that will turn out to be a superstar and sell for enough to cover the expenses you describe, most won't. Plus, laying out such a large amount of cash on an animal that could go lame, colic, maim itself, etc. at any moment is risky.

Couture TB
Sep. 20, 2009, 09:25 PM
Here is an example of a dirty rotten shame/ investment that didn't turn out.
http://i297.photobucket.com/albums/mm205/MattsonTraining/MightyMouse.jpg

I picked him up at an auction. He was drugged to the nines. When the drugs wore off he was so scared of people that he would brake out into a white lather and try to climb up the stall walls. Worked with him for a long time. Never got him to calm down. Some days you could ride him, others not so much. Ended up loosing my butt on him. You know the reason? At the time I had to pay board on him.

Sugarbrook
Sep. 20, 2009, 10:13 PM
OH WOW. He looks adorable. Was this picture taken when you first got him (drugged) or later on?

Couture TB
Sep. 20, 2009, 10:18 PM
After. He was a obease thing with so much hair that you could not really tell what he was like. That is the only photo I have of him. Took months to get him to the point that you could even get a quiet photo. He was the nicest mover you'd ever seen and could jump the moon. He did end up falling in love with my old farrier's niece though so ended up being a bop around the farm type pony. The little girl was the only one he would trust to ride him and handle him in small spaces.

Anselcat
Sep. 20, 2009, 10:21 PM
...pony board at the barn I will keep the pony at is $1060 a month,

Burning through $1,000+ every month for board is no way to make a return on your investment. If you were keeping him at your place, maybe, but at a boarding barn with a trainer involved? I am not optimistic.

rideagoldenpony
Sep. 21, 2009, 01:40 AM
Sometimes you can.... but I'm doubtful about your scenario because of the board. Do you have any other (way cheaper) board options in your area?

Kiara
Sep. 21, 2009, 01:51 AM
I have done several project ponies, maybe 15 or so, and to be honest, you make some, you lose some, and you break even on some. There is no for sure profit. You do it more for the love of the process than the money.

In my experience, the best resale ponies have been free-$500, and I only had them for a short time. I do not board the project ponies, they live in my front yard, I work with them regularly and have my trainer come out on occasion only if needed. If I show the ponies, I do a limited amount of classes. I use warm up days at small shows to get them exposed. My average monthly cost on a medium pony is about $80.

Your $10,000 is much better spent on a young horse with potential, than trying to bring a pony along to make enough money for a made horse... in my honest opinion.

2foals
Sep. 21, 2009, 08:15 AM
The other thing I might add, is that we never purchased a project that had behavior issues other than being green... For one, behavior issues can take a looooong time to resolve, even with proper training/handling. The other was that any history of behavior issue is a major impediment to getting a KIDS pony sold. Don't want to discourage people from rehabbing ponies with behavior problems, just not for resale.

Trixie
Sep. 21, 2009, 09:14 AM
I am hoping to buy the pony for 10K or less, pony board at the barn I will keep the pony at is $1060 a month, including 1 private lesson/hack by the trainer a week(the trainer at this barn is a big time hunter rider), I will pay all expenses for a Junior rider to ride it at A and AA shows, and the barn I will be riding with shows in Florida in the winter, I will send the pony to Florida depending on how good it's doing If anyone has any comments or stories, please share them, I need as much advice as possible

That's a horrible idea.

Sorry, but a horse is a huge risk. A horse that's costing you $1060 a month is a TERRIBLE risk for "profit." ESPECIALLY in this economy.

Paying to show a pony on the "A" circuit to the tune of maybe (on a low end) $15K+ per year, +1060 in board per year, plus vet, farrier, etc: around $30K. Plus a $10K purchase price, leaves you around $40K in the hole... if you ONLY have it and show it for a year, and IF nothing bad happens.

They're horses. Something bad always happens. It has one bad colic or breaks itself, you're out at least $40,000.

Now, take that $40K and buy something that YOU want to ride and compete. Or find a cheaper boarding situation. Nearly $13K worth of board per year is a VERY high overhead. And there are NO guarantees that it will even sell in this market.

You shouldn’t put more into a horse than you can afford to lose, because they will not all sell for profit. This is not an “asset” – it’s a liability. Only if you’re very lucky will it become an asset. And there are a limited number of ponies who will finish to the quality of a $50K+ pony, and that doesn’t even net you a whole lot of profit.

bizbachfan
Sep. 21, 2009, 09:21 AM
all good comments, I would say that if you can get the pony very cheaply (under $2,000) and keep it at your place for virtually free, (ponies don't eat a lot) and it has no vices and you can ride it or have someone else ride it for free then maybe you can make a profit. But boarding, training, tons of A shows no way you can make a profit unless it was perhaps a super fantatic pony with an impressive pedigree and a total packer that takes all the blues.
So good luck for a hobby, not a business.

LovesHorses
Sep. 21, 2009, 10:41 AM
You are also going to need to spend a lot more than $10K in order to get the quality that you need to take to Florida. Plus, it will have to be pretty darn trained by winter. I have to spend that just to get a 2/3 yr old that will be a hack, model and over fences winner at the top hunter shows. Uh, and that normally doesn't mean it is very broke LOL.

Summerwood
Sep. 21, 2009, 02:09 PM
I agree that you have to somehow figure out how to get free or cheap board. 1K board is outrageous to try to even think of making money on a pony. Ponies don't require a lot of room, most don't need any grass even, and they don't eat much. You can keep your costs way down if you are resourceful. I purchased a pony project several years ago...fell in love with her because of her movement. She was not the fanciest pony but she was absolutely 100% kid safe for any child, even as a very young pony. I bought her as a yearling, sold her as a 4 year old and made a modest profit on her. Had I had to pay tons of board and training on her, no way would I have made a profit. I began breeding welsh and welsh x's because of this little mare and the absolute blast that I had with her!!
There are tons of mediocre ponies around, so make sure you have someone knowledgable about bloodlines, movement, etc to make sure that the pony has a chance of being a high end pony. That still doesn't guarantee that a kid will be able to ride it. A child-friendly attitude is extremely important.
If you can work out the expenses so they are minimal and want to do it for the experience of it, then by all means, go ahead and have fun...ponies are FUN!! Otherwise, you may want to take your 10k and just buy yourself a fancy horse foal and let it grow up. Good luck!

Pippen2
Sep. 21, 2009, 03:50 PM
I was lucky enough to be able to train both a medium and a large and do this, and while it was really fun I have to say we probably didn't end up making any money from the experience. I bought both as two year olds and even kept them at fairly cheap places but with board, vet bills, and showing it just adds up a lot. If money isn't a really big issue I would say go for it though, it can be very rewarding to see the hard you put in. My large ended up winning a medal finals and my medium is now packing a 7 year old in the short stirrups and its so cute and it was a great experience for me.

Lori
Sep. 21, 2009, 04:37 PM
It sounds like your investment will eat your profit if not cost you more in the end.

sansibar
Sep. 21, 2009, 04:51 PM
You are also going to need to spend a lot more than $10K in order to get the quality that you need to take to Florida. Plus, it will have to be pretty darn trained by winter. I have to spend that just to get a 2/3 yr old that will be a hack, model and over fences winner at the top hunter shows. Uh, and that normally doesn't mean it is very broke LOL.

I agree to buy a winning pony for that much money it will have to be pretty young, which they are out there but then you have to factor in board until the pony is old enough to be ridden.

indygirl2560
Sep. 21, 2009, 06:00 PM
I did that but on a much smaller scale and I didn't buy the pony for the sole purpose of selling her. I got her for $4000 and sold her for $10,000 a little over a year later. She was a nice mover, completely safe for anyone to ride/handle(except body clipping), but difficult to train because she was very stubborn when it came to certain things. When I got her, she had been a broodmare and sat in a pasture most of her life, (she was w/t broke under saddle). I took her from that, to doing 2'6 hunter/eq courses. And because she was so incredibly safe(I could gallop her in company bareback with a halter and lead rope and bring her to a walk in seconds; no buck, rear, bite, bad habits, etc), I marketed her as a kids hunter/eq pony and that's what sold her. Her new owner does w/t and short stirrup stuff which is perfect for her. It also helps that she was only 8 and had a lot of years left in her.

I'd be very careful of what you buy right now because you might end up being stuck with the horse longer than what you'd expected. Make sure you do a very thorough pony search and get a pony with good movement and absolutely no soundness issue. Also, since you're looking to get a medium, make sure it's temperament is kid suitable; the smaller the pony, the more likely it is that your buyer will be someone looking to her a kid ride and handle it. That said, good luck!

JA
Sep. 21, 2009, 06:24 PM
Also from my experience mediums make the worst investments. If you are set on buying an "investment" then get a top of the line large.

I had a medium that won ribbons at Tampa, Ocala, Vermont, Pony Finals etc and I lost my shirt on him because of the expenses (board, daycare, entries, commissions, etc)

I would never buy any horse or pony as an investment again! Buy one because you love it.

keepthelegend
Sep. 21, 2009, 06:53 PM
If you are going to be successful with your plan you have to A) find an incredible pony that is absolutely the deal of the century for 10k. Most 10k ponies don't have the potential to be worth 50k or more (which what you need to make a profit after a year of board, showing,comissions etc) because they are not special enough. Thats why I import my ponies. B) Find a really good pony rider. A kid that wins in Florida is slick and very talented and very in demand. If your kid goes in and makes a mistake you will not get a ribbon. Is your trainer or are you very well connected? C) Assess yourself honestly if you are the rider. Can you truly teach an auto change, etc? Remember these are ponies you are selling to kids, not a pre green horse to another pro that can deal with issues. Even a green pony needs to be safe and easy and relatively made to be successful in the green division - in Florida it needs to look like a regular pony in the ring - can you take something so green that you get it for 10k (and thats your only shot to get something fancy...it will be DEAD green) and get it perfect in only one year? That would be quite a feat...what if the pony needs a year of CHildrens pony first? Another 20k -30k in it. Then you start the greens two years later. That a lot in the pony. What if all goes perfect and in 1 -2 yrs you have a winning pony in the greens. Well, that is hardly selling right now anyway! So just be careful!

Gideon
Sep. 21, 2009, 06:59 PM
I know a lot of people who can't even give away a nice pony, in today's market.:no:

showponies
Sep. 21, 2009, 07:41 PM
Another way is to take a pony on consigment..You don't have to put out buying money..Just your time and up keep and you get a precentage when it sells, but still board at 1,000 a month is steep for a turn around pony...

CrossWinds81
Sep. 22, 2009, 12:23 AM
I'm gonna play both sides here...

You are lucky to have $10k to invest in a nice young pony...and can obviously afford the $1000+/mo board, or you wouldn't have made that your option...though as others have said, your margin for profit becomes much much higher if you can find a much less$ board option. The difference in having a REALLY nice pony to start with and a "cheaper" "with issues" pony to start with is that you likely will have the package that top AA riders are looking for...you also have in your favor the business connections of your top trainer...if you can afford to do top shows in FL to get the pony exposed with a top pony rider then chances of selling pony for a lot of $ is also much higher. Fact is fact...you cannot get big $$ for a pony without a good show record. That is an investment...but if you have it to spend with no regrets then, you are also ahead of the game.

What I would possibly consider is looking at purchasing a nice pony that has been shown on the local circuit, but is THE package, and already has riding miles on it. These are the diamonds...training is for the most part done, but the owners do not have the $ to take the pony to get the exposure that will lead to a higher sale price. It will take a lot more searching, but will be worth all of the searching too.

All that said, the market has been soft lately. The 2009 Pony Auction was a pittance...really sad, and too bad you weren't here to pick one up because you could have gotten a really decent deal on a pony already qualified for Pony Finals. I would seriously consider trying to find another board option and afford to hang onto something really nice until the market comes back again, because when it does I think there will be a new surge of buying. I don't think it will be toooo much longer, I hope not at least. That's my 2cents for now.

Rio Blanco
Sep. 22, 2009, 01:00 AM
And then there is the flip side, the horse that I got for free and sold after he had only been showing for almost 2 years for $12,500 (adjusted sale price after he vetted like swiss cheese, but still did his job willingly and stayed sound with maintenance). He wasn't supposed to be an investment, infact I swore up and down that I would never sell him (...and then I sat on my exGP mare and he was on his new owner's trailer headed off the farm and off my tab not even a month later...) and I worked off 90% of my show bills when we did the Children's and JR hunters, and I worked for my trainer (sole groom for 15+/- horses) so my board was $250/month instead of $950.

So I now see I got really really lucky, especially now that I have a 2 year old Holsteiner filly that's bred to the hills and I've owned her since she was a week old.... and she was the main source of my vet bills for the first year of her life. :sigh:

MyFancyHunterPony
Sep. 22, 2009, 09:03 AM
We have our own farm and I have bought and sold ponies for profit for several years now. We grow and harvest our own hay and all of our's stay out 24/7 and I don't show very often so if it easier for me to make a profit.

I usually buy them for $2000 or less and sell them for a little bit of profit.

It can be done, you just have to be very smart about it. Only do it if you have somewhere cheap to board and don't have your coach advertise for you. Do it yourself over the internet.

RockinHorse
Sep. 22, 2009, 09:10 AM
Has anyone on COTH ever experienced buying, training, and selling a pony to make a profit? After college, I am thinking about buying a young, green, medium sized pony, training it, possibly finding a junior rider to show it in the pony hunter/equitation classes, and then selling it for more than what I bought it for.

If it really was this easy, most of us would have a lot more money than we do now ;)

Tini Sea Soldier
Sep. 22, 2009, 11:02 AM
I did this at the height of the market a few years ago. I had 2... one I sold within a month of buying him... but he was only 2... and I got twice what I paid. THAT was a fluke FOR SURE.
The other... I got her as a giveaway... spent about about 4 months working with her, but she was VERY TALENTED... so she went right into the medium greens. We ended up leasing her for 6 months... she came back... and then I ended up selling her at the pony finals auction the following year. She did all the A Shows... with a few championships and reserves... and even then... I just about broke even on her.
In today's market... I would never do it.

MintHillFarm
Sep. 22, 2009, 11:08 AM
I would not advise investing the 10k you mentioned! Try finding a cheap pony that you can resell quickly. Take the profit from that one and find another. Or as another poster mentioned, buy a green horse, put some time in and resell.

It is not worth investing all that you listed in the hopes of the big score. Professionals often do not get that lucky...buy low and then sell even for a 500 or 1000 profit and then move on.

Best laid plans unfortunately are often not fulfilled. Keep your $$ to a minimum and the financial pain will be less too.

MintHillFarm
Sep. 22, 2009, 11:12 AM
Here is an example of a dirty rotten shame/ investment that didn't turn out.
http://i297.photobucket.com/albums/mm205/MattsonTraining/MightyMouse.jpg

I picked him up at an auction. He was drugged to the nines. When the drugs wore off he was so scared of people that he would brake out into a white lather and try to climb up the stall walls. Worked with him for a long time. Never got him to calm down. Some days you could ride him, others not so much. Ended up loosing my butt on him. You know the reason? At the time I had to pay board on him.

What a shame! Nice type...I would have bought him too!