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Come Shine
Sep. 15, 2009, 11:57 AM
There is a show coming up that has a modified Grand Prix at 4'. I am reliably showing at 3'9" but have never done a 4' division. My mare has also never done a 4' division. We have showed at this venue in the past and done well in the lower divisions.

I would really like to show her myself in the big class but don't want my mare to have a bad experience. Should I try and find a pro to show her?

Couture TB
Sep. 15, 2009, 12:09 PM
That all depends on if you are jumping 4ft at home and are comfortable with it. If you are and your horse is and you feel that you are not over facing either you or the horse and your ony concern is that you will be doing it at a show, then do it. You never know until you try. Just practice practice practice.

PNWjumper
Sep. 15, 2009, 12:19 PM
Something to keep in mind: If the horseshow is of a decent size and they are expecting a fair number of entries in the modified GP, the course will likely be built large (i.e. wide, square 4' oxers) and more difficult than your average division. It's very likely that it will ride like a bigger course than it actually is (if that makes sense).

At the very least I would enter the horse in the 4' jumpers earlier in the week. If you're comfortable doing it then do it yourself (I would expect that you're jumping larger at home if you're comfortable at 3'9"). If you're nervous then have a pro do it on the first day and go from there. It probably still wouldn't be a terrible idea to have a pro ride in the big class if the week goes well. I personally don't feel like there's a big change from 3'9" to 4', but that's totally dependent upon what you're doing at home and how long you've been doing 3'9", how scopey your mare is, how comfortable you are over bigger fences in general, etc.

JinxyFish313
Sep. 15, 2009, 12:32 PM
I wouldn't want you or your horse's first experience at that height to be any type of grand prix setting. As was said, the course will be bigger and more technical than a regular 4' class earlier in the week. I'd get a pro to jump her in something 4' first and if she does well and you're feeling confident, take her in the next 4' class yourself. I would pass on the modified GP for the first show out at a new height though.

Briaffer
Sep. 15, 2009, 01:59 PM
What's 3 more inches? If you feel confident enough to do it then go for it.

Come Shine
Sep. 15, 2009, 02:08 PM
Thanks so much for the feedback!

It's a one day county fair jumper show. They start the jumps at 3' for the training jumpers and go up from there. The GP is the same track but bigger and wider fences. In the past, the footing in the ring has been good, the fences are nice and the course designer isn't crazy.

What I may do is the schooling jumper division (3'6"/3'9") and if we are both jumping around well, then I'll do the GP.

Wish me luck! :)

Long Spot
Sep. 15, 2009, 02:11 PM
Something to keep in mind: If the horseshow is of a decent size and they are expecting a fair number of entries in the modified GP, the course will likely be built large (i.e. wide, square 4' oxers) and more difficult than your average division. It's very likely that it will ride like a bigger course than it actually is (if that makes sense).

At the very least I would enter the horse in the 4' jumpers earlier in the week. If you're comfortable doing it then do it yourself (I would expect that you're jumping larger at home if you're comfortable at 3'9"). If you're nervous then have a pro do it on the first day and go from there. It probably still wouldn't be a terrible idea to have a pro ride in the big class if the week goes well. I personally don't feel like there's a big change from 3'9" to 4', but that's totally dependent upon what you're doing at home and how long you've been doing 3'9", how scopey your mare is, how comfortable you are over bigger fences in general, etc.

Great advice. Whatever you decide, have fun! Sounds like a lovely fun show!

Quinn
Sep. 15, 2009, 02:48 PM
Come Shine, I have of course seen you ride. You go girl!!!

http://community.webshots.com/user/ballyduff

Come Shine
Sep. 15, 2009, 03:24 PM
You always make me smile Quinn!! :D

JinxyFish313
Sep. 15, 2009, 03:24 PM
What's 3 more inches? If you feel confident enough to do it then go for it.

Well usually its not just 3 more inches. In most cases as the fences go up so do the difficulty and technical level of the course. There are lots of horses that can answer the questions asked of them at 3'9" but can't make it in 4' divisions.

findeight
Sep. 15, 2009, 04:13 PM
Lots that school 4' that can't get around a Mini Prix course as well. They are just built bigger, wider and the TIME allowed is quicker-and it's hard for anybody without a ton of miles to ignore that and end up pushing a little too much.

IMO you should school the height in a warm up class but let the Pro handle that Prix class.

It's well and good to move up but a still inexperienced horse needs the confidence of that Pro when faced with a new challenge the owner has not yet mastered.

Come Shine
Sep. 15, 2009, 05:27 PM
I haven't had anyone else school my horses in about 15 years. How many rides would a pro need to get comfortable with the horse and/or the horse comfortable with a different rider?

Are there any drawbacks to having a pro ride?

findeight
Sep. 15, 2009, 06:08 PM
I haven't had anyone else school my horses in about 15 years. How many rides would a pro need to get comfortable with the horse and/or the horse comfortable with a different rider?

Are there any drawbacks to having a pro ride?

Just damage to the wallet:lol:.

But, seriously, if the pro is any good, maybe 1 or 2 schooling rides during the week and/or a schooling class earlier in the week. Most if them can get it with just 1 school and the warm up...some can get it with just the warm up-if they are any good.

Choose the Pro carefully. Remember, it's business.

Beau Cheval
Sep. 15, 2009, 06:21 PM
Are you ready to show a more experienced horse in the 4' division confidently? Can you jump your horse 4'3 comfortably at home?
The best way to avoid a bad experience is to go into the ring confident. If you can do that, then go for it. If not, I would have a pro show her for her first time.

Come Shine
Sep. 15, 2009, 09:47 PM
I don't jump a ton at home because we had a pretty heavy show schedule this summer. However, I have put some jumps up at 4' in our ring just so I can get a feel for how big that really is. The 3'9" we were doing at shows seemed pretty little sometimes.

I can totally understand about being confident going in. That would be my big concern, that I would clutch. My mare has a big heart if my heart is in it but she needs a committed ride. There's a lot less room for error as the fences go up.

I have a call in to the pro I would like to ride, so I'll wait to hear back from him. It won't break the bank to have him out a few times to ride and I will definitely benefit from watching. Then if I don't feel ready, he can be on standby.

I must admit that I was feeling like a bit of a wuss for wanting someone else to ride my horse since it is only 3" different than what we have been showing for 2 years. However, I feel a lot better hearing that I'm not wimping out.

Thanks!

Madeline
Sep. 16, 2009, 02:17 AM
I haven't had anyone else school my horses in about 15 years. How many rides would a pro need to get comfortable with the horse and/or the horse comfortable with a different rider?

Are there any drawbacks to having a pro ride?

Yes.
1. You don't get to have all the fun and feeling of accomplishment that you deserve from getting to where you are. You've done the work, you should get the reward.

2. If you got a Beezie Madden or a Mclain Ward or someone of that ilk, it might be fun to see what your horse can do, but not all pros are like that. You may find that on the great continuum of competence, a pro you find at a local one day show probably rides more like you do than like Beezie does. See #1.

Come Shine
Sep. 16, 2009, 10:12 AM
Yes.
1. You don't get to have all the fun and feeling of accomplishment that you deserve from getting to where you are. You've done the work, you should get the reward.

Even watching my horse going in the Modified Grand Prix would be reward enough. Watching a horse I have trained from a 4 year old up to this. Just even thinking about it makes me happy and proud.

[/QUOTE]2. If you got a Beezie Madden or a Mclain Ward or someone of that ilk, it might be fun to see what your horse can do, but not all pros are like that. You may find that on the great continuum of competence, a pro you find at a local one day show probably rides more like you do than like Beezie does. See #1.[/QUOTE]

That would be so cool if Beezie came to the little county fair!!!!! :)

Personally, I think my horse jumps a bit like Authentic. :yes::D

On a serious note, the fellow I am hoping will ride would be a good person to support my girl in stepping up a notch.