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View Full Version : Any reviews on the Equilibrium Stretch and Flex Wrap Boots?



thatmoody
Sep. 12, 2009, 10:47 PM
Before I drop $80 on them? I am too lazy to actually wrap, but we are starting to do more lateral work and I want something for support and protection. My Friesian's legs are rather fat (plus all those feathers add bulk), so our local feed store doesn't carry splint boots that fit quite right. I was looking at these in Dover, and liked the way they look and sound rather like wraps, but are easier to put on. So does anyone use these? Pros/cons? I don't like sports medicine boots because they are hot, and these are supposed to be cooler, too, which appeals to me.

Pony Fixer
Sep. 12, 2009, 11:27 PM
I just got some and LOVE them. Very light, no heat buildup. But not great for a horse that really interferes--ie, they are not heavy-duty protective. However, I wanted light protection in a boot for occasional brushes/touches for a horse that does not routinely interfere, and I am very concerned about heat buildup and it's negative effect on tendons and ligaments. They are probably a similar protection level to a polo wrap, but quicker and easier.

They run large width wise to me. I have a smaller warmblood and the mediums work well.

FYI no boot will offer support. NO BOOT. If you want light weight/light protection, these should be on your list.

Shiaway
Sep. 13, 2009, 01:50 AM
I should save this somewhere because I think it's the 4th time this question has come up and I have to retype my answer. LOL

Stretch and flex wraps won't offer support, just like no other boot or wrap will offer support. In terms of their protection I would rank them just a smidge more protection than a polo wrap, so not that much.

If you have a horse who often brushes himself this is not the boot for you.

But if you have a horse who maybe just once in a while will brush himself they should be fine. While there is heat build up during the hotter months, I would say of all the boots and wraps out there these are the most breathable.

They are the only boots my horse can wear without causing rubs. If I didn't have that problem with him I'd probably go with a woof splint boot.

thatmoody
Sep. 13, 2009, 07:08 AM
Yeah, I know they don't actually offer support, except for my addled brain - that's what I get for typing when I wake up from a long nap :D.

I meant brush protection. He's not shod, and I haven't noticed any nicks, so I don't think he's interfering seriously, and most of our lateral work is at the walk/trot. So it seems like these won't hold heat as bad as some of them (and I've taken off polos that were just dripping with sweat - we live in Florida) so that was kind of what I was looking for. Thank you for the feedback...

JLC7898
Sep. 13, 2009, 07:05 PM
I have two pairs for Front and Hind. I really like them. I just need a tiny bit of protection,because thanks to my new farrier my horse no longer interferes. Seem to be really comfortable for my horse as well. The first time i used them they slid down on his legs,but i know it is because i had adjusted them too loose. How snug do you all fasten them on your horses?:) Also do look around for the best price, i bought one pair at my local tack shop for full price, when i decided i liked them i bought the second pair on Advanced Saddle Fit for 1/2 off!

HollysHobbies
Sep. 15, 2009, 12:26 PM
I like the ASB sport boots--they are less pricey, but seem very similar in weight/feel to the ones you mentioned.

I use the Dover sport boots for everyday as I felt they offered better protection.

thatmoody
Sep. 15, 2009, 12:41 PM
Do you have a link to a size chart for the ASB ones? I was looking at those already but I measured his cannon bones at 25cm, and that's just a touch bigger than even the Equilibrium XL if they are stretchy. I think that the XL for the Equilibrium is listed at 22-24cm, but they do stretch a bit.

HollysHobbies
Sep. 15, 2009, 12:49 PM
I had the Mediums for a really light boned TB.

To me, it's not a huge issue if there's a little gap on the outside of them since I'm protecting his legs from his other legs. :lol::lol: You could buy them at Dover and just bring/send them back if they don't fit--they're good about returns.

Pony Fixer
Sep. 15, 2009, 01:55 PM
I will say I used the Dovers for years (lined and unlined). I have no problem with the quality for price, but they are heavy and hot. Latest research says heat may be a problem for tendon/ligament health, which is why I have gone to a light weight boot. If you have to really worry about protection, then that is different--you would need something with a stronger strike plate.

caddym
Sep. 16, 2009, 09:23 AM
I have a pair and I am really disappointed in them. To keep them from slipping, they need to be tighter than I feel comfortable with - much tighter than a polo. although they did not slip until after a washing.

Shiaway
Sep. 17, 2009, 05:03 AM
I've never had trouble with slipping and I really don't apply them tight and my horse would let me know if they were tight. He's not too fond of tight things on his legs as I found out one day when someone polo wrapped him for me and it was a little too tight for him.

n2dressage
Jan. 30, 2011, 05:14 PM
Does anyone have them in white? Do they stay close to white or come decently clean after washing?

yaya
Jan. 30, 2011, 07:34 PM
Unless you get red clay on them, they stay pretty white. but red clay stains everything!

I use black ones for everyday, and white ones for clinics and warmup at shows.

Pony Fixer
Jan. 30, 2011, 07:44 PM
Ditto yaya. I wash them in the washer, on hot, with oxyclean and bleach and they have held up well. I don't dry them, but once dry I spray with scotchguard.

yankeeclipper
Jan. 30, 2011, 08:57 PM
Anyone else having problems with the velcro over time? I bought a pair for the hind in July of 2010 and one of the boots the bottom strap won't stay on.

atr
Jan. 31, 2011, 12:37 AM
I bought a pair of their wraps, which I haven't seen in this country, when I was in England last November. I haven't had a chance to use them yet because it's been so wet and yucky since then, and they are white...

But their theory is very similar to the Eskadron Climatex wraps (which are really nice)--wicking stretchy stuff next to the skin, stretchier and protective stuff for the second half--but more tight and stretchy (and a bit less expensive than the Eskadrons--though even they were a lot less in the UK... I have a plethora of wraps to play with once the world dries out enough that I'm not bringing half the arena in with me when I've finished riding.)

Anyone tried these?

Mary in Area 1
Jan. 31, 2011, 01:21 AM
These boots are completely worthless. They are flimsy and ugly and my horse FRACTURED his splint bone right through them. He was cantering a 10 meter circle and lost his footing only slightly. His shoe bumped the boot, which gave no protection.

Worst money ever spent. Save yours.

GimmeQs
Jan. 31, 2011, 10:18 AM
I hadn't heard of these until this thread. Anybody use the bandages? Like then? My one pair of eskadrons are about ready for the garbage.

SisterToSoreFoot
Jan. 31, 2011, 11:02 AM
I have a pair of the Stretch and Flex wraps, not the boots. They are really slick looking and are light and easy to apply. They stay on nicely and don't make my pony's legs hot. He's sensitive about his legs, and he seems to find the boots really comfortable. They contour really nicely to the leg, which I like--the bulkier books always make me worry about the horse tripping when/if the boots snag on each other.

While its true that a boot with a hard leather shell might protect the leg a bit better, it will also make the leg hot. Personally, I love these wraps, though I don't use them every ride. I mostly use them when schooling new moves, or when I'm lunging and want a consistent visual to assess his stride (he's got two white stockings and two black legs, the white wraps help me see his movement better).

Jeito
Jan. 31, 2011, 11:20 AM
A lot of people at my barn have them. They are super easy to put on and easy to clean. I'm pretty sure the flatwork wraps are on sale at Dover for $62 or so, and you get a free pair of bell boots if you buy two pairs. We were looking at the catalogue in the barn yesterday. My trainer was rolling her eyes and making faces (that's what she thinks of them), but I may just have to get another useless piece of tack :yes: :winkgrin:

ButterflyIris
Jan. 31, 2011, 12:01 PM
This question started me thinking about my boots - I use the Thin Line Sport boots all around and it has a hard shell on the inside to protect from strikes. I don't see dressage people using this type of boot at all. Sometimes when I look at them I can see where his hoof has hit and I'm glad that I have them because a fabric/cloth boot wouldn't provide that kind of protection. Yes his legs do get warm in them - if he's sweaty under his saddle, he will be sweaty under the boot. But neoprene is much worse. I think it's a good product - they have held up for three years with no signs of breaking!

http://thinlineglobal.com/store/cart.php?m=product_detail&p=25

Pony Fixer
Jan. 31, 2011, 02:28 PM
They aren't "useless". They offer about the same protection as polo wraps, and the point of them is airflow and lack of heat build-up (which has been shown to increase potential thermal tendon injuries) and to protect the leg against mild brushing (not hard impacts). I tend to ride with NOTHING (horrors!) but my horse doesn't usually interfere. I keep mine for clinics and the like.

Now, my horse could mis-step and whack himself good at any point, with or without a boot, and have an injury. Them's the "breaks".

As for the Thinline boots (which I have not tried--and I could say the same of any of the thicker/harder boots), if they have a hard strike plate and Thinline padding, I can't imagine they stay cool underneath, which could lead to a different set of problems, potentially just as bad as a strike injury.

It all depends what's more important to you--extra protection against interference (and nothing is perfect for that, horses are strong and hooves/shoes are hard and moving at speed) OR light protection against minor abrasions/brushing in a lightweight boot/wrap.

Jeito
Jan. 31, 2011, 03:48 PM
"Useless" was tongue in cheek :winkgrin: I have polos in every conceivable color :D (If I didn't, I would buy these instead.) While in theory I understand the concerns about "heat build-up," I've never known a horse to have problems from polos, and we used to use them 100% of the time in hotter climates.

Pony Fixer
Jan. 31, 2011, 05:01 PM
DB, I don't think polos get nearly the heat buildup that some of the "boots" do, and that's the point. You can have a heavy boot that may have too much heat but better impact protection, or a light boot (or polos) with less impact protection but also less heat build up.

CZF
Feb. 2, 2011, 09:11 AM
I've not tired them, but I think I saw an ad that said they have the regular and now a heavier protection one, just FYI. I think it's a little thicker padding.

Don't quote me on that but I'm 90% sure I saw that somewhere.

Jeito
Feb. 2, 2011, 01:56 PM
DB, I don't think polos get nearly the heat buildup that some of the "boots" do, and that's the point.

Sorry, I misunderstood. Got it now :D ! I've found two types of Equilibrium wraps. I think the flatwork wraps are the ones they call boots, and they don't seem to provide much more protection than polos but seem more convenient and easier to clean (I would use them if someone me a pair as a gift :winkgrin:). They're these -

http://www.doversaddlery.com/product.asp_Q_pn_E_X1-0412

The training wraps are supposed to provide extra protection, but I'm not sure if they mean a wider area of protection or more protection against impact. I've never seen anyone using these -

http://www.doversaddlery.com/product.asp?pn=X1-04521&zmam=1460880&zmas=1&zmac=66&zmap=X1-04521&re=viewbuyrec

lintesia
Feb. 2, 2011, 11:28 PM
I've had these for several years:

http://www.doversaddlery.com/product.asp_Q_pn_E_X1-0412

I've found that they don't really prevent heat build-up and it's impossible to keep the white ones looking white.

That said, they are way cool looking and I get tons of compliments on them (well, my horse gets tons of compliments!).