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SaturdayNightLive
Sep. 10, 2009, 11:03 PM
So today I took a lesson with a new trainer in my area. She is young, but seems to know what she's talking about. However, she said something to me that has me kind of baffled. I was riding my 16h anglo arab who is of a medium-ish build. She told me that I was too big for him and really need a bigger horse. I'm 5'8" and a size 6/8 in street clothes. Am I really too big for him? Keep in mind that I am not going to show this horse above the very local level...ever. I bought him because he is amazingly fun to ride. So I don't really care if I appear slightly too large on him - this may be the case and I'm okay with that. However, am I too big to be riding him safely? Trainer seemed to think so, so I thought I'd bring it to COTH. What do you think?

Limerick
Sep. 10, 2009, 11:06 PM
We need a photo! Sounds like it should be a good fit though. :)

SaturdayNightLive
Sep. 10, 2009, 11:11 PM
Sadly I don't have any photos of this one. Not yet anyway. I'll work on it though. ;) In the meantime, I'm just trying to figure out if I am going to hurt my horse in any way by riding him. Like I said, he's 16 hands, probably 1100 - 1200 lbs.

gooselover
Sep. 10, 2009, 11:12 PM
My mare was about 16H if not a tiny bit shorter and I am 5'9. She was a somewhat "stout" mare and I did not look too big for her.

And you are a size 6-8? Come on - for a trainer to tell you that you are too big? I would question the trainer's sanity.

Gry2Yng
Sep. 10, 2009, 11:19 PM
NO NO NO you aren't going to hurt your horse by riding him. He would probably be fine if you weighed 200 pounds and your feet were dragging the ground.

EiRide
Sep. 10, 2009, 11:21 PM
Sadly I don't have any photos of this one. Not yet anyway. I'll work on it though. ;) In the meantime, I'm just trying to figure out if I am going to hurt my horse in any way by riding him. Like I said, he's 16 hands, probably 1100 - 1200 lbs.

Good lord. Hurt him?? Not unless he has kissing spine or something.

It's a "look" thing, which I think is stupid. Ever see the size of kids on their ponies in the UK? They sure are not "sadly outgrown" at nearly the rate they are here. Ever take a peek at those big tall cowboys on the real classic style cutting and working cow horses?

I'm 5'6" and not a stick insect in size, and I feel very comfortable on my horses, who range from 14.3 to 16 hands, although my filly is headed towards 17!

Mimi La Rue
Sep. 10, 2009, 11:38 PM
I had a trainer once who told me the same thing. I was only around 16 years old at the time, 5'7" and it was a 15.3 TB. Well my parents and I followed her advice and it was a big mistake because that horse was awesome in so many ways. Looking back at photos I did not look big on him at all and he was a very safe horse that took care of me. If another trainer ever told me again that I was too big for a horse appearance wise, I'd walk away.

vacation1
Sep. 10, 2009, 11:40 PM
If he's skinny and you're tall, maybe it looks a little off, but I don't see how someone who's a size 6 could actually hurt the horse. Is she afraid you'll overbalance? :lol: Sorry, it just seems funny that anyone of average weight could be considered too 'big' for a 16h horse.

DancingQueen
Sep. 11, 2009, 12:00 AM
I think it depends on what you want to do. Arabs are generally a little smaller but strong and can carry more weight.

If you are tall on your horse ( 5.8' could be tall if your legs are long and he is a slight and narrow horse) it might not be as pretty a picture in a show setting as if you were riding a larger horse.
If you like your horse and are not aspiring to show a lot you are fine. If you do want to take him to shows and think your legs are a bit long for his body try just going up with your stirrups a bit for the jumping or even using a thick jumper type pad underneath your shaped pad to give your legs an extra inch along his side for the flats if you do hunter/eq stuff.

If you are just pleasure riding and training mostly to have a good time you might want to keep yourself a tiny bit more upright over bigger jumps if you have a long torso rther then a long leg. He'll most likely let you know what he is comfotrtable with, your trainer is concerned with you look at shows. (or she could be trying to sell you a horse) LOL

kateh
Sep. 11, 2009, 12:03 AM
BS! Maybe if your horse is narrow and you have long legs and you were aiming for big time eq finals. But healthwise? Yeah right. The entire western world would be in big trouble-all those big cowboys on those barely 15hh quarter horses.

tBHj
Sep. 11, 2009, 12:23 AM
Sounds like your new trainer is trying to sell you a new horse.

AnotherRound
Sep. 11, 2009, 12:27 AM
Sounds like your new trainer is trying to sell you a new horse.

I agree. Overweight riders can seriously stress the muscles, back and tendons on a horse IF they aren't strong and well balanced, but other wise, I wouldn't worry, if you are a good rider. I guess any rider can harm a horse because they are poorly balanced and cause the horse stress by tipping off to one side or something, but your weight (I assume you're about 145) shouldn't bother the horse per se.

Try agreeing with her just for fun, or saying "Gee, ya think?" and see if she tries to sell you a horse. You can always say "Well, thanks for the lessons, it was great".

DancingQueen
Sep. 11, 2009, 12:55 AM
Whoa a little here.

It could very well be that new trainer has a horse in mind for OP. But if this is the first thing that pops up in your mind then you might want to do a quick attitude adjustment.
Yes, I also mentioned it in my last post but in the end and as an afterthought. Asa trainer my first thought was as to how to make it work for OP in a competitive situation. I train at a show barn and my mind drifts towards the showexperience.

It could be that new trainer has her showclientel in the back of her head and is simply referencing her experience out on what might happen at a show. Riders that are looking too tall for their horses seldom pin as high as they could have on a horse more suited to their size. *shroughs shoulders*

My barn is a competitive show barn. We have a lesson program but 95% of your boarders wants to compete.
When a new boarder look us up we presume that they want to compete since that is what we do. We will give our assesment based on those premises. If the proispective boarder is more of a hobby rider they will probably be happier somewhere else. Sometimes we have a friend of a boarder move in becasue they know somebody and are close by. They are not looking to be competitive but our initial assesment will stil be for somebody who wants to do shows since that is what we do.
If the rider tells us that they are not really looking to win at shows or even go to shows at all outside of recreational in house or small unrateds we will adjust the expectations, lessons and training sessions to reflect this but we will need a heads up from the student.

If OP goes back to trainer and says look, I have this horse. I love him to pieces. I want to do 2-3 small shows every years and I want to go to have fun and compete against my last show not the others. If this trainer comes back with adjustments to make this scenario happen once she knows the goal of her student. I like her.
If she insists that OP is too big or makes snarky remarks to the fact in lessons even after knowing the goals of OP then it might be time to look around for a different trainer.
You have to remember that young trainers are sometimes a bit single minded and over zealous. If she listenes to your goals and gives you something goog from each lesson. Stick with it!

If you like the trianer

Go Fish
Sep. 11, 2009, 01:14 AM
Try jacking your stirrups up and then see what she says.

Mach Two
Sep. 11, 2009, 01:30 AM
Repeat after me: I really love this horse, he's fun to ride, and I love to get to a couple of shows and enjoy the process.
Now, for every time the thought of this trainer saying something negative about this horse that you enjoy so much, remember that 100 of us here think that trainer is a silly, spoiled child who always had the sizes and colors and breeds of horses that her parents bought because some trainer "made them" buy them.

You could weigh 220 lbs and this horse would carry you just fine, and jump simple hunter courses. You sound like a fit, sensible person. Tell this trainer (if you decide you like the lessons) that you love this horse, and want to enjoy him for all the reasons you told us. Your horse sounds perfect for you, and your reasons for riding sound terrific! Enjoy!

pixie
Sep. 11, 2009, 01:31 AM
If you are tall through your torso it absolutely could be a safety issue. If you accidentally lean up your horses neck at the base of a jump and you are very tall above the saddle this could potentially really unbalance your horse on takeoff. Think Christopher Reeve. IMHO he was too toptall for the size of the horse he was riding to jump safely.

Pirateer
Sep. 11, 2009, 03:40 AM
Repeat after me "Well bless your heart."

JenEM
Sep. 11, 2009, 04:00 AM
However, am I too big to be riding him safely? Trainer seemed to think so, so I thought I'd bring it to COTH. What do you think?

No.

You're absolutely not too big, and definitely NOT going to hurt him! :lol: Will you make a perfect eq picture? Probably not, but at local level shows, it will hardly matter, and using those standards, a lot of male professionals look "too big" for the horse they're on.

I'm 5'10", size 6, and ride a 16.1H TB. I've been riding her for two years, and not only has she had no ill health reprecussions, I've never even once heard "you're too big for her" even from the fancy hunter trainer we were in training with for a few months.

Being a good Virginian, I'll second Pirateer's advice: "Well bless your heart!"

GilbertsCreeksideAcres
Sep. 11, 2009, 06:27 AM
Don't let her fill you with doubt on this matter. It's handing her control over something she has no business in. Remind her that you are asking her to teach you and your horse, not to find you a new horse.

The Pony Club Manual 1 offers suggestions about rider size vs horse size, by the way, but I would take it with a heavy dose of salt if you like your horse and feel good on it.

JRG
Sep. 11, 2009, 06:49 AM
Then I would be too big for mine. I would set your new trainer straight right from the get go.

Addison
Sep. 11, 2009, 08:06 AM
I guess I am cynical. My first thought was that the trainer had a horse to sell you.

However, sometimes a new, less experienced trainer will try to make a significant statement to impress you with their knowledge and assessment skills. A more experienced trainer would most likely wait awhile, work with you a bit and get to know you and your horse before making such a statement.

If you were 5'9" riding a 14.1 pony that's another story. (JUST KIDDING)

bizbachfan
Sep. 11, 2009, 08:15 AM
Every horse and rider combo is different. But if the question is will you hurt your horse, NO WAY NO HOW. (unless your horse has some health issue, is emaciated, etc) Maybe you have really long legs and your horse has a small barrel and so you look a little big on it. w/o pics hard to tell. I wouldn't say your trainer is crazy but just telling your her opinion and you can just file it away and forget about it.

please post a pic when you get a chance

je.suis
Sep. 11, 2009, 08:39 AM
I agree with the poster who brought up the subject of width. If a tall, lanky rider is on a slim barreled horse , it may give the impression of being too big. I didn't get from the post that the trainer thought weight was an issue, but rather length of the rider's leg in comparison to the horse's girth. A wide barreled horse takes up a lot of leg and I don't think this is the case. Did you ask if you were heavy or looked undermounted? Don't write off the trainer just yet. She sees what she sees. She may also see, if the horse has a short neck and you have a long torso, that you appear "too big"" to the eye of a judge. Have fun if you're not showing.

Giddy-up
Sep. 11, 2009, 08:41 AM
Whoa a little here.

It could very well be that new trainer has a horse in mind for OP. But if this is the first thing that pops up in your mind then you might want to do a quick attitude adjustment.
Yes, I also mentioned it in my last post but in the end and as an afterthought. Asa trainer my first thought was as to how to make it work for OP in a competitive situation. I train at a show barn and my mind drifts towards the showexperience.

It could be that new trainer has her showclientel in the back of her head and is simply referencing her experience out on what might happen at a show. Riders that are looking too tall for their horses seldom pin as high as they could have on a horse more suited to their size. *shroughs shoulders*

My barn is a competitive show barn. We have a lesson program but 95% of your boarders wants to compete.
When a new boarder look us up we presume that they want to compete since that is what we do. We will give our assesment based on those premises. If the proispective boarder is more of a hobby rider they will probably be happier somewhere else. Sometimes we have a friend of a boarder move in becasue they know somebody and are close by. They are not looking to be competitive but our initial assesment will stil be for somebody who wants to do shows since that is what we do.
If the rider tells us that they are not really looking to win at shows or even go to shows at all outside of recreational in house or small unrateds we will adjust the expectations, lessons and training sessions to reflect this but we will need a heads up from the student.

If OP goes back to trainer and says look, I have this horse. I love him to pieces. I want to do 2-3 small shows every years and I want to go to have fun and compete against my last show not the others. If this trainer comes back with adjustments to make this scenario happen once she knows the goal of her student. I like her.
If she insists that OP is too big or makes snarky remarks to the fact in lessons even after knowing the goals of OP then it might be time to look around for a different trainer.
You have to remember that young trainers are sometimes a bit single minded and over zealous. If she listenes to your goals and gives you something goog from each lesson. Stick with it!

If you like the trianer

I agree here.

For us to judge without a picture is difficult. Are you hurting your horse? Not at all. But we can't see how how you fit your horse & therefore can't make any judgements.

Have you explained to new trainer your goals or expectations? Do you have show goals? Did you discuss them with trainer? Perhaps that is why trainer made the comment?

SaturdayNightLive
Sep. 11, 2009, 08:54 AM
I have no show expectations for THIS horse. I have my fancy import who is roughly 16.3 and about 1400 lbs (think HUGE warmblood) if I want to go show. I bought the horse I was riding in the lesson (who's name is Thug) because he's cute, way fun to ride, and about ready to be retired. Mostly, I wanted him to be a pasture pal to my already retired equitation/junior hunter. Trainer knows that I have no showing ambitions with this horse. And honestly, she made it sound like a weight issue. I weigh 146 lbs as of this morning. I would never have thought of this as too heavy, but maybe I'm wrong? Thug isn't a teeny, refined horse. He is of a decent size, good amount of bone, and on the fat side. Do I think I look like an eq rider on him? Not really, no. But I never thought I was going to hurt him by weighing 146 lbs either. Am I wrong?

see u at x
Sep. 11, 2009, 09:32 AM
Good lord. Hurt him?? Not unless he has kissing spine or something.

It's a "look" thing, which I think is stupid. Ever see the size of kids on their ponies in the UK? They sure are not "sadly outgrown" at nearly the rate they are here. Ever take a peek at those big tall cowboys on the real classic style cutting and working cow horses?

I'm 5'6" and not a stick insect in size, and I feel very comfortable on my horses, who range from 14.3 to 16 hands, although my filly is headed towards 17!

I agree with this 100%. Especially the part about the "look" thing being stupid. From what I recall hearing, John Wayne was over 6' tall and never rode a horse over 14.2. Seriously, if your heels aren't dropping down below your horse's barrel, then you're probably just fine.

ETA: Just read your post above. No, you are NOT wrong.

Kimberlee
Sep. 11, 2009, 09:51 AM
Look at pictures from Scottsdale. There are plenty of "plump" trainers showing tiny arabs. Doesn't seem to be to "hard" on them. http://www.osteenschatzbergphotos.com/

I would just keep riding him and enjoying him.

luvs2ridewbs
Sep. 11, 2009, 09:52 AM
If the horse is ready to be retired and is arthritic and old, she may be making a valid point. A weight limit on an elderly horse is not unheard of.

Due's Mom
Sep. 11, 2009, 10:12 AM
It being an arab might be part of it. If you carry a lot of your height from hip to head and if said horse is short necked or high headed then it can look as if you are too big for the horse. I rode a half arab cross many years ago who I swore would set his head in my lap. There was just no horse out in front of me

Hunter/JumperMom
Sep. 11, 2009, 10:16 AM
So today I took a lesson with a new trainer in my area. She is young, but seems to know what she's talking about. However, she said something to me that has me kind of baffled. I was riding my 16h anglo arab who is of a medium-ish build. She told me that I was too big for him and really need a bigger horse. I'm 5'8" and a size 6/8 in street clothes. Am I really too big for him? Keep in mind that I am not going to show this horse above the very local level...ever. I bought him because he is amazingly fun to ride. So I don't really care if I appear slightly too large on him - this may be the case and I'm okay with that. However, am I too big to be riding him safely? Trainer seemed to think so, so I thought I'd bring it to COTH. What do you think?

In your original post, you don't say anything about hurting him, so I don't think that is the issue, re: riding him safely, that should be the question if that is what you are concerned about. How did she say you are too big for him? were you jumping? is it just not "the right look" or did she say you could hurt him?

My daughter tried a 16.1 hand jumper the other day, she was perfect on him, she is 5'7" and maybe 130lbs, but the picture just wasn't perfect. He is kind of narrow in the front, so she looked big on him, but perfectly fine, just the not "best picture", but certainly not unsafe.

findeight
Sep. 11, 2009, 10:30 AM
Hurt him? No. And this is a moot point because you don't want to show however, if this is a show trainer? They will give you an honest evaluation based on that fact.

And I don't care what they do in the UK or at Arab shows, if this is an Open Hunter Jumper barn that teaches regular Eq over fences? She may, actually, be telling you the truth because it's not so much height as your torso and leg length versus his neck and barrel shape and depth. jacking the stirrups up throws the rest of the position off, particularly if the neck is short.

If you LOOK too tall on him, you will not be used as well in the shows in Eq on the flat. Depending upon how he is put together, he may not allow you good support for your leg because of barrel size and depth and he may not allow you to keep a good position over fences depending on his neck length and set/carriage.

And, are you sure he is 16h? Have you sticked him? That is extremely tall for a purebred and some that do stick there are very leggy while lacking depth in the barrel and chest.

Anyway, doesn't matter that much because you don't want to show anyway. Share that with the trainer...but, again, she may be correct if the proportions are a mismatch and it might hurt your position.

need more information and a pic to really form an opinion on the specifics.

SaturdayNightLive
Sep. 11, 2009, 10:39 AM
He sticks at 16 hands and 3/4 of an inch. Again, he is NOT a purebred - he is an arab/thoroughbred cross. He is not arthritic, or in any other way unsound. When I say ready to retire, I mean age wise. I retire my horses still 100% sound.

I understand the equitation issue, I really do. Again, I have no intention of showing this horse. I have a show horse for that. I was simply asking whether or not I was too big to ride him from a health standpoint.

I don't have a picture of me on the horse in question yet. I do, however, have a picture of me on a smaller thoroughbred mare. She is roughly 15.2 and very fine boned. Do I look good on her, not really, but I don't think I look particularly dangerous on her. She's not mine - she was a horse I drew for a competition in college.

http://yfrog.com/66n1154760098300330222921j

TheRedFox
Sep. 11, 2009, 10:39 AM
I think your trainer is being silly. I'm almost 6'0 and slender build and a 16 hh is just about right for me. I'm sure you look lovely on your horse.

Scott Free
Sep. 11, 2009, 10:58 AM
It's amazing to me how many people are jumping all over this trainer for telling you that you're too big for your horse - they haven't seen you on the horse.

I also doubt that many of them are hunter riders, or show beyond the local level, or they wouldn't be so quick to tell you that you're FINE, why, you'll look just like JOHN WAYNE!!

I'm assuming you paid the trainer for some instruction & her opinion. She gave it to you. If you don't like it find another trainer. If you want to know more about her opinion, ask her.

I happen to agree with the posters who have said that you probably will not physically hurt a 16 hand, 1100 lb horse. If you just want to go ride the trails or rope the cows, then it certainly doesn't matter what you look like. Enjoy. And may I respectfully suggest you consider finding a trainer in a different discipline.

SaturdayNightLive
Sep. 11, 2009, 11:01 AM
Another discipline? I do the A/O Hunters on my other horse. I'm not new to the discipline and I do show above the local level. I'm not mad at the trainer, I understand that it's her opinion. I'm just asking if I'm in danger of injuring the horse I literally just hack around.

Scott Free
Sep. 11, 2009, 11:09 AM
If you're not new to the discipline than you should be well aware of where the trainer was coming from with her statement.

I don't think a lot of the posters who replied to you have a clue. They also haven't seen you on the horse, so I can't imagine why you would post a question like that and expect an intelligent response.

findeight
Sep. 11, 2009, 11:10 AM
OP, I see no reason for you to think you would hurt anything over 14 hands or so after seeing the picture.

But, again, I am in an AA barn that does alot of teaching and shows nationally and you do have a long torso, you look "too big" on that mare in the pic because of her neck and back length versus your torso length. That, especially the neck, will effect your position over fences, especially if you have to jack the stirrups up.

Trainer is being silly if she say you will hurt that horse, not a chance of that. But, maybe, she feels she cannot teach you as well on this one because the proportions involved and their effect on your position.

Enjoy the horse, I am sure you will be fine. Seek another trainer if you want but don't get too down on this one for being honest about her opinion. Sometimes we pay them for their opinion and don't like what we hear. And, again, it's perception here based on the showring requirements she trains clients to meet. perhaps you can either compromise here or just go seek another trainer that is more basic and less show ring.

trubandloki
Sep. 11, 2009, 11:13 AM
SF who pissed in your corn flakes this morning.


I think the OP is just worrying about something that she would not normally worry about but since someone said something she has gotten herself tied in a knot and wants other opinions.

Given the information you posted (and looking at the photo of you) I would say that you are not at risk of causing the horse any harm.

SNL do you plan to ride with this trainer again? Why not call her up and ask her to clarify what she meant. I would guess, like the others here, that she is saying your picture is not as pretty as it could be if you are planning on showing. Not that you will do harm to the horse.

magnolia73
Sep. 11, 2009, 11:23 AM
Much is proportion.

Is your upper body too tall and it looks awkward? Are your legs too long on a narrow barreled horse?

If you look at an *average* horse, 16'1 is taller than average. You are slightly taller than average. You probably are well matched. Except... the HJ/Eq "look" favors a small rider on a larger horse. Sometimes to a really ridiculous degree.

You're not going to hurt the horse- hello, Mark Todd/Charisma.... Joe Fargis Touch of Class. Small horses, tall men. But.... there are judges who would have probably overlooked them in an eq class for looking big on their horses... though probably not because they are both outstanding riders.

You know- you probably have a light built, elegant horse and I think for whatever reason people have come to prefer Sherman Tanks for local hunters. Really, its just aesthetics, and keep in mind- winning is different than having a safe, fun time.

rabicon
Sep. 11, 2009, 11:30 AM
Your not going to hurt this horse :no: I don't know why SF is so mad :confused: You understand that you aren't going to the big shows on him and your not riding in big eq on him. I ride a 14.2H 950lb pony of my daughters and even "jump him" :eek: from time to time. I'm 5'7 and 125lbs and he has not problem. My friend has actually also rode him and she's 5'4 150lbs and he carried her without a problem and the vet even said we were crazy thinking we'd hurt him. :lol: You might no make the most beautiful picture but if you just want to show him locally and have fun with him before he retires then go for it. I wouldn't get mad at the trainer so much, sounds like she has bigger dreams in your future than you do with this horse. Just tell her you don't care what you look like on him its just for fun and she can concentrate on you and your other horse for the big shows.

BLBGP
Sep. 11, 2009, 11:45 AM
Did your trainer actually say you were going to hurt your horse or did she just say you looked too big for the horse for the show ring?

LH
Sep. 11, 2009, 12:06 PM
Saw your picture on the little bay horse - if we're talking about whether you "decorate" that horse and are compatible from a size perspective, I would tell you that with your long upper body and that horse's short neck and back, you look a little tall for that horse. It's not an ideal match, but if you have good upper body control and are quiet with your upper body, that match might be fine!

You are certainly slender enough that you are NOT going to do any harm physically to a 16h horse. Is that horse an ideal match for your body proportion? We dont know - haven't seen any pictures.

I show at AA shows, and there are plenty of taller riders on smaller horses (like older kids in the small juniors) who "make it work" by being very quiet in the tack. If you feel too tall for the horse, it might be apparent in your ride. If you feel comfortable - then enjoy the horse!

The trainer might be correct from the perspective of matching you up for equitation - IF you were a junior and actually cared about that. I know you are actually an A/O, and although suitability for horse and rider is always an issue in terms of judging, that goes more to performance and temperment. And also, you're talking about local shows - don't worry about this!

akhunterrider
Sep. 11, 2009, 12:11 PM
I do not think you are too big for him, nor do I think you will hurt him by just hacking. If you were jumping big fences all the time, it might be a bit more of a concern. However, you have good upper body control and are certainly not too tall or too heavy to be on the horse. You will not hurt him. :)

Mach Two
Sep. 11, 2009, 12:18 PM
Look at pictures from Scottsdale. There are plenty of "plump" trainers showing tiny arabs. Doesn't seem to be to "hard" on them. http://www.osteenschatzbergphotos.com/

I would just keep riding him and enjoying him.

Ummm....but the OP is a trim, fit rider...anything but plump. I am fairly sure you did not mean to imply that, though.

I have a dear friend who is an excellent rider, who has a 16 H TB/WB cross that is not particularly big built, and my friend at 5'10 is a woman who has always carried some weight. I'd say at fighting fit she weighs 190, yet she rides very well, and does the adult jumpers, and clinics with some very good trainers who don't tell her she's too big for her horse. She started her mare as a 3 year old, and the mare is now 13 and still wonderful.
Yes, yes, if you are going to do the "A" hunters at the top shows, other riders your height will be on bigger horses because that is the trend. You don't look too tall on your mare, and I'll bet you don't look too tall on your Anglo Arab.
Enjoy him, go to the shows you want to go to, and like has been suggested, regarding this young trainer who probably wants to sell a horse and impress you with how much she knows about showing, say "Bless her heart"

Equus_girl
Sep. 11, 2009, 02:06 PM
Well, I am in a pretty much same boat. I am 5'11, 140lbs and horsie is 16.1 on a good day with shoes :)
I know I am a bit too big for him :( but I do not think I hurt him in any way.
There are issues, of course, like I have to constantly stay in control of my body, cannot lean in corners, cannot lean forward too much as any of it throws him off balance. On the bright side- it makes me a better rider :)

Niether me or my trainer (same height, same weight) had any problems showing him in H/J world, but we do get our share of comments "he looks like a pony" at dressage shows.

http://public.fotki.com/equusanya/first/dsc00964.html

Timex
Sep. 11, 2009, 03:01 PM
If you were 5'9" riding a 14.1 pony that's another story.

Well, I'm 5'10" and my current hunter is a 14.1 1/2 pony. So we must be ok. Lol. Between his conformation, my body type and my ability to adapt to a slightly shorter stirrup, we make it work. We show at both breed and open shows, and do pretty well, and never once has anyone told me that I was going to hurt him. Or any of the other small horses and ponies that we have. So, OP, I wouldn't be too concerned!

Addison
Sep. 11, 2009, 05:44 PM
In general the size of the rider does matter in the large pony divisions and may be a problem when showing as suitabilty does count. I knew the moment I posted a specific height that someone would contradict the statement.

I was trying to lighten up the topic and help to reassure the OP.

I do not think someone who is 5'9", 5'10' or six feet for that matter will harm most reasonably sound ponies. I do not think that is true therefore, I did not suggest it.

wyldhorseb
Sep. 11, 2009, 05:52 PM
I'm 5'10" and I ride a 15.1hh mare.

http://www.facebook.com/home.php#/photo.php?pid=2629094&id=704541823

http://www.facebook.com/home.php#/photo.php?pid=2246300&id=704541823

http://www.facebook.com/home.php#/photo.php?pid=2464165&id=704541823

theblondejumper
Sep. 11, 2009, 06:08 PM
This thread makes me paranoid.

Timex
Sep. 11, 2009, 06:30 PM
In general the size of the rider does matter in the large pony divisions and may be a problem when showing as suitabilty does count. I knew the moment I posted a specific height that someone would contradict the statement.

I was trying to lighten up the topic and help to reassure the OP.

I do not think someone who is 5'9", 5'10' or six feet for that matter will harm most reasonably sound ponies. I do not think that is true therefore, I did not suggest it.

Keep in mind that not all of us ride in pony divisions. At 30 years old, I haven't ridden in a pony division in, well, let's not go there! And since I didn't think the OP was worried about the pony divisions, either, my brain didn't go there. remember, not all of us worry about how we'd appear if we had the audacity to show up at a rated show, so some of these things seem almost petty. Too tall for a horse, proper hunter hair, the 'right' breeches, etc, a lot of us show for fun (even at some bigger shows!) And really couldn't be bothered by some of the things other people agonize over. Neat and tidy, after that, no biggie.

Back to your regularly scheduled viewing. Lol

Addison
Sep. 11, 2009, 07:30 PM
TIMEX please check your PMs.

Gry2Yng
Sep. 11, 2009, 07:38 PM
I'm 5'8" and a size 6/8 in street clothes. Am I really too big for him? Keep in mind that I am not going to show this horse above the very local level...ever. I bought him because he is amazingly fun to ride. So I don't really care if I appear slightly too large on him - this may be the case and I'm okay with that. However, am I too big to be riding him safely? Trainer seemed to think so, so I thought I'd bring it to COTH. What do you think?

This is the original post. I am certain there is no need for a picture to answer the question "However, am I too big to be riding him safely?" Questions about his soundness perhaps. The post actually states "I don't really care if I appear slightly too large on him." So why do we need a picture? OP does not ask if she will pin in an eq class.

jolise
Sep. 12, 2009, 01:27 AM
Wow. I can't believe some of these responses. Big is definitely in fashion but this is ridiculous. 5'6" fit rider with average build is NO WAY too big for a 16+ hand horse. I think the trainer was being rude. You are not pointing for the big eq. Nobody worries that their 5 foot 100 pound frame is too small for their 17 hand behemoth.
I sold a lovely 15.3 hand mare because I got a complex that I was too big for her. In retrospect, I really enjoyed her, she was fun for me to ride and I regret selling her.
Enjoy your horse, you are not hurting him and it is silly that anyone even made that suggestion.

TSWJB
Sep. 12, 2009, 01:55 PM
i am 5.8ft and rode a barely 16h horse last year in the jumpers and we did very well together as a team. as long as i didnt jump ahead i looked pretty good on him over fences. and he had no trouble carting me around. we only came home once without a champion or reserve! he was fast and we had fun together! this horse had a short neck and a short body as well. and i never felt too big on him.
i think the key is that the horse should have a bit of a barrel to hold up a taller persons leg and a fairly good position so you dont leap up the neck and not let yourself get too heavy.
enjoy your horse!

chukkerchild
Sep. 13, 2009, 01:14 AM
You know who looks too big?? JOHN ANDERSON on TERRIFIC

... I'd like to look big if it wins me some grand prizzzz babeh

RugBug
Sep. 13, 2009, 01:15 AM
Well, I'm 5'10" and my current hunter is a 14.1 1/2 pony. So we must be ok. Lol. Between his conformation, my body type and my ability to adapt to a slightly shorter stirrup, we make it work. We show at both breed and open shows, and do pretty well, and never once has anyone told me that I was going to hurt him. Or any of the other small horses and ponies that we have. So, OP, I wouldn't be too concerned!

Do you happen to ride Welsh ponies? I've never seen soo many too big riders on too small mounts than at Welsh shows. Made me a little sick to my stomach, to tell the truth. I felt so bad for those poor little ponies. Riders weren't "fat" for the most part...just should've moved on to horses years and years ago.

sansibar
Sep. 13, 2009, 09:33 AM
I'm 5'6 and I just bought a 13.2 medium pony XD who I know I am too big on lol, but this pony was never bought for me just as a project :)

You look fine on the horse I knew people/still know people who are easily 5'10 and still showing in the larges and on small horses.

fair judy
Sep. 13, 2009, 10:21 AM
joe fargis....... touch of class :lol: yep, get rid of your horse. look how unsuccessful this pair was:cool:

http://arcadiasbest.com/wp-content/uploads/Olympics84FargisJumpFix600.jpg

briddygirl
Sep. 13, 2009, 03:17 PM
a trainer told me that she needed a larger horse --- now mind you my daughter is 5'9 and weights approx. 140 lbs. and the horse is 16.1 H warmblood, but built more like a TB.....I told her that I wasn't made of money and that my daughter and horse would have to "do"....I got the distinct impression that she just didn't like my horse....it wasn't an "easy" training and that she wanted something that would guarantee to get ribbons to make her job easier, etc. --- needless to say, we aren't w/ her any longer! Plus, we LOVE our horse!!!!

rottngirl
Sep. 13, 2009, 03:27 PM
My former trainer used to tell me that I was way to big for my horse, not a soundness issue but a fashion issue: I am 5'5" 125 and he is about 14.3h. But I love his size!!

When she finally got me on an "appropriate" sized horse at like 16.3h I was soooo uncomfortable and just hated it.

Life is too short to let others force their opinions on us ;-)

Enjoy your horse!!!

RugBug
Sep. 13, 2009, 07:24 PM
a trainer told me that she needed a larger horse --- now mind you my daughter is 5'9 and weights approx. 140 lbs. and the horse is 16.1 H warmblood, but built more like a TB.....I told her that I wasn't made of money and that my daughter and horse would have to "do"....I got the distinct impression that she just didn't like my horse....it wasn't an "easy" training and that she wanted something that would guarantee to get ribbons to make her job easier, etc. --- needless to say, we aren't w/ her any longer! Plus, we LOVE our horse!!!!

If you're daughter is 5'9" and 140...she very well may be too big for a 16.1 TB built warmblood. Why is it always a conspiracy when a trainer gives advice that owner's/rider's don't want to hear? If you love your horse, great...but that doesn't change what may be fact...rider is "too big" for the horse.

I almost have the opposite problem: my trainer will try to make any horse work for what the owner wants. She's the queen of 'let's make it work.' But in reality, that theory only works to a certain level: you reach that level and then plateau. Which is all well and good if you realize that you've chosen to plateau because (take your pick) a) you ARE too big for the horse, b) horse isn't talented enough/fancy enough/suited to the ring you want to ride in, etc. Sometimes you are okay with the plateau, but more often than not, you see threads like "My trainer sucks, we're not progressing" or some such. Sometimes trainers are damned if they do, damned if they don't.

(P.S I've taken responsibility for my level of success regardless of my trainer. I recognize my limitations and my horse's. If I chose to go farther, I buy another horse (which I recently did)).

HowDoILook
Sep. 13, 2009, 07:42 PM
This thread makes me paranoid.

Tell me about it :D Im 5'8" (and 125 lb. soaking wet) on a 14.1 7/8 Large Pony. I know Im too big for him, but I think he handles me well.

Ozone
Sep. 14, 2009, 11:06 AM
At least for the most part we are talking about horses and their riders that in reading seem to fit just perfectly imo!

Went to a show yesterday and witnessed a 12H (if that) pony carting about a wilderbeast of a women! She was GROSSLY too large for this pony to the point where she had no post because ass and saddle hit too quick together for the pony's stride.

I am 5'3 115lbs. and ride a 15.2H Draft X. Why is it that we are usually too big for our horses but no one is ever too small for the horse? LOL ;)

findeight
Sep. 14, 2009, 11:37 AM
As often happens, we seem to be coming at this based on our own experiences, not what the OP is necessarily going to do.

At an actual USEF rated show, the competition is stiff and a size mismatch can hurt overall impression in a class like Hunters that is judged partly on overall impression. And size mismatch can effect rider position-especially too long arms in relation to neck length, no way any kind of long release is possible without sticking your hands in their ears. Even an auto is going to look weird with long arms below the bottom of the neck.

But it's not going to hurt the Pony or horse. Those who show alot at higher levels are going to note that a size disparity (either way, a rider too small is not going to do that well against top competition in Hunters or Eq either) can and will hurt a rider. Those that show only lower level locals where it's all about getting around safety and those that don't show at all will be less put off by a size mismatch which, really, does not matter as long as you know it will at high levels.

Oh, and the tall kids on the Regular division Ponies? They can get dinged for suitability and they do. Unless the trip is that much better then the others.

GrayCatFarm
Sep. 14, 2009, 09:45 PM
Frankly, I'd love to be 146 lbs - again; oh, and at the age I was when I did weigh that amount!