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dressagedevon
Sep. 8, 2009, 06:33 PM
This is for the riders who have their horses at home or board at a different barn then their trainer. Do they come to your house (barn) or do you trailer to them? I don't know how to do a poll, sorry, that would be easier. Also what do you pay? Is there a price difference between the two? TIA. :yes:

Puddin Pie
Sep. 8, 2009, 06:38 PM
Both. The BNT that I ride with, I trailer to her, unless she is giving a clinic at a nearby barn-but I still trailer there. Obviously the lesson at her place is cheaper, as the clinic is covering her travel expense and ring fees, etc. But the clinic local is 30 min from my barn and her barn is 1 hour. My coach sometimes comes to me and sometimes I go to her. If I am riding her schoolmaster, I go to her. If I am riding just my horse, she will sometimes come to me (and we get lunch afterwards).

IdahoRider
Sep. 8, 2009, 06:42 PM
Well, most of the time she comes to me. But during the winter there are times when snow and/or ice keep us from a lesson at my barn and then she will come pick my gelding and me up and haul us to a covered arena for a lesson.

I am sooooo blessed with this woman!
Sheilah

piaffequeen
Sep. 8, 2009, 07:00 PM
My trainer comes to me. If I had a truck and trailer I would trailer over to her since she has a covered arena. It's only about $10 difference.

Ellie&Werther
Sep. 8, 2009, 11:16 PM
My trainer is young, this is her second year as a pro and she comes out to my farm to teach me. She works primarily as a assistant trainer at a local barn but also travels out. As she is getting more demand she is now starting to get more selective about who she goes out to teach, for example she just let go of a farm that was way the heck and gone without a heated indoor, which really is a must in Minnesota.

Carol O
Sep. 8, 2009, 11:28 PM
Mine comes to me. We feed her gourmet meals, and we put her up right! The care and feeding of Excellent Trainers Who Come to You is an art and a science, worthy of study should one be so fortunate to find one. Feed them, comfort them (read warm shower, bathrobe after a long day... All the pampering anyone would like...). You will be glad you did.

exvet
Sep. 8, 2009, 11:43 PM
My riding instructor comes to me. Occasionally we'll meet up at other facilities where I do pay a ring fee; otherwise, her rates are very reasonable and do not change regardless of where she teaches. I've ridden her horses in lunge lessons and she does not charge me extra. I consider myself very lucky.

mandalea
Sep. 9, 2009, 05:11 AM
Both. In the holidays, weekends, public holidays, it depends. If she is having a lesson with the girl up the road, she'll come to my place.

If it's wet, or I have to practice for a show, I'll go to hers, because she has a sand arena that doesn't hold water, and it's full size. I have a smaller grass arena.

She'll come to mine after school, because she's my health teacher, and I sometime get a lift with her.

blackhorsegirl
Sep. 9, 2009, 08:36 AM
My trainer comes to me but I do pay $10 more than those who are real close to her. Also, I'm one of 4 students who train with this instructor. We have our lessons right after each other and we're ready and on time.

ania
Sep. 9, 2009, 08:46 AM
Mine comes to me. We feed her gourmet meals, and we put her up right! The care and feeding of Excellent Trainers Who Come to You is an art and a science, worthy of study should one be so fortunate to find one. Feed them, comfort them (read warm shower, bathrobe after a long day... All the pampering anyone would like...). You will be glad you did.

:lol: carol!! your trainer is lucky to have you as a student!
my trainer came to me. it was close enough where she didn't charge a travel fee, but the BO charged me a ring fee.

katarine
Sep. 9, 2009, 10:03 AM
both- it's a little less if I go to her and she's got a bigger arena than I do at home...

carovet
Sep. 9, 2009, 10:08 AM
i drive the2 hrs tro go to him

swgarasu
Sep. 9, 2009, 10:41 AM
Mine comes to me, and yes, I too feel very lucky!!!
:D

paintlady
Sep. 9, 2009, 11:21 AM
Both... my trainer will travel to the farm I board at if she has at least three lessons in the area. Otherwise, I will haul my horse to her place. It's $10 extra if she comes to my farm, but I'm saving on time and gas.

Calhoun
Sep. 9, 2009, 11:53 AM
The last three years I have been blessed w/ trainers who come to me. I have been in situations where you have to travel an hour or two and frankly it's a pain in the rear end. By the time you pack your gear, get rolling, take the lesson, clean up yourself and the horse and get on the road again, half the day is gone. Not to mention cleaning out the trailer and unpacking when you get home. I'll pay an extra $20 a ride not to travel, my time is worth more.

JMurray
Sep. 9, 2009, 01:30 PM
trailer to trainer 45 minutes away. I have just a small ring on my home farm. Traveling gives me a chance to work once a week, at least, in a large arena with comfy footing.

yaya
Sep. 9, 2009, 01:46 PM
Both.

One trainer comes to me once a week. She doesn't have a barn of her own, so travels to students all over.

The other trainer I haul to twice a week. She's less than 10 minutes away, but has a lot of her own horses to train, so can't spare the time to leave her barn.

rabicon
Sep. 9, 2009, 02:01 PM
Mine comes to me. She charges 50/hour if I go to her its 40/hour. Best trainer I've ever had, I couldn't believe she was so cheap. I had a different trainer that was big in dressage that charged 75/hour to come to me and that was a waste of money.:o

Janet
Sep. 9, 2009, 03:23 PM
Both.

And the ones that come to me DO charge mileage.

J Lav
Sep. 9, 2009, 03:29 PM
I have to go to my trainer. He doesn't travel out to anyone but he is so good that it's worth the 2 hour journey each way.

I try to take 2 horses each time I go.

I travel to my clients as I don't have a yard but I do have to limit how far I'll go.

Most livery yards here don't have a trainer on site or if they do it's often just a low level allround PC type of teacher rather than someone who is a bit more specialist so most trainers go to their clients. The clients don't usually have to pay any extra to have their trainer come in and use the facilities as such use is included in the care costs.

Most of the yards I go to will have between 2 and 10 different trainers going in every week.

JLC7898
Sep. 9, 2009, 03:29 PM
My trainer comes to me a couple times a week. When i was much farther away my trainer still came out for the same Private lesson rate.Love them!

Knight's Journey
Sep. 9, 2009, 03:52 PM
There are a few boarders at my facility who take lessons from my trainer so she'll come out and do about four lessons/ training rides a few days a week.

She trains this way at only a few facilities to cut her costs and simplify things for her clients as there's not enough space for all of us to crowd into her barn.

oharabear
Sep. 9, 2009, 03:55 PM
Both. My dressage trainer comes to me, and I haul out to my h/j trainer. My dressage trainer doesn't charge me any extra than if I went to her, but that's because she's literally a block away. She also teaches across the river once a week and does charge them a bit extra, since it's about a 45 minute drive.

I do see my dressage trainer twice as much as my h/j trainer, mostly because hauling out is a bigger PITA for me (and my first love is dressage, anyway. I just *happen* to have a rediculously talented medium hunter pony that needs to start showing).

goodpony
Sep. 9, 2009, 04:36 PM
Our trainer comes to us weekly and we school two-four on that day. Occasionally more than once a week when preparing for something special. So far this works for us!

Petstorejunkie
Sep. 9, 2009, 04:54 PM
Trainer comes to me. I did go and find a nice TB to free lease so there is something fun for her to ride here as well.

dressagedevon
Sep. 9, 2009, 07:54 PM
Thanks for all the replies, my trainer has always come to me but lately schedules have conflicted and since I am 45 min away its hard for her to get here and she suggested I come to her and I wanted to know if this was the norm. Thanks again.

Knothead
Sep. 11, 2009, 08:44 AM
I go to her. Even if she's a tad closer teaching a clinic, I still go to her. But between her extra costs for coming to me, having a minimum amount of people she'll travel for (4) and trying to figure out ring times and ring fees to the barn owner, it's just easier for me to go to her. And I have the privacy being "off" the farm to work with her, too. It's one hour each direction. I thought I would mind when I started, but I really don't.

Boomer
Sep. 11, 2009, 09:06 AM
I live in the sticks, so I trailer to my trainer. She is a 2.75 hour drive from me, one way.

I try to go twice/month, depending on my job schedule and diesel costs.

This winter I plan to send my gelding to the trainer's for 5 months of training, so I will drive the car there 2-3 times/month for a lesson.

WBLover
Sep. 11, 2009, 03:09 PM
For those that go to your trainer's, and your trainer is also the BO or BM where you take your horse to, is it customary for them to charge a haul-in or ring fee since you are a non-boarder? I would think not, but I just wanted to see.

Do you get a set of cross-ties in the barn where you can tack up? Or do you tie your horse to the trailer to tack up? I'm just picturing when daylight savings time goes, I'll be doing evening lessons and it will be DARK! Just wondering how these things typically work!

yaya
Sep. 11, 2009, 03:13 PM
No trailer-in or ring fee, and crossties both for tacking up and the washrack.

Sometimes I think it'd be easier tacking up at the trailer rather than hauling everything inside, but it's shadier in the barn!

crazyhorses
Sep. 11, 2009, 03:56 PM
I do both. My dressage trainer comes to me and I trailer to my jumper trainer.

Carol O
Sep. 13, 2009, 10:47 PM
The coolest thing about my trainer coming to me? I get to ride braless! Cooler both literally and figuratively.

Of course during the ride I must wear the fishing vest, with the sugar cubes, gloves, cell phone, etc on hand. Can you even imagine wearing all that, a shirt, and a bra????

thicusqui
Sep. 13, 2009, 11:01 PM
I am not so knowledgeable about this matter. So i have to learn it. Thanks for the post.
Thanks so much for sharing the post.


Property, asset, project, document and internet management software (http://internetmanagementsoftware.org)

HollBear
Nov. 11, 2009, 01:04 PM
so...if you have a trainer come to you (you're at a barn that does not have a trainer) what id the typical fee that the BO charges for this? Just trying to get an idea.
Thanks!

Wayside
Nov. 11, 2009, 02:36 PM
so...if you have a trainer come to you (you're at a barn that does not have a trainer) what id the typical fee that the BO charges for this? Just trying to get an idea.
Thanks!

Though I know that some do, I've never had a BO ask for a "ring fee" or anything like that from me.

One BO asked that trainers have their own insurance, and lessons were prohibited during specifically outlined "peak" times. If I recall, it was something like no lessons in the indoor arena between 5-7pm.

Current barn has a calandar where it's considered polite to write down your lessons so they don't interfere with other people's.

I pay $10 extra to have a lesson at the barn I'm boarded at, but that's the "travel" expense that I pay to my trainer, not something I pay to the BO.

If I lesson at trainer's place, I do not pay the travel fee, or a ring fee, so it's $10 cheaper.

magickmeadow
Nov. 11, 2009, 03:38 PM
My current trainer comes to me. There are a couple of us who take lessons from her so we schedule on the same day, one after the other. My previous trainer did not travel, heavy competitive schedule, so if I wanted to ride my horse I had to haul. She had training horses that she could use for students.

Since we are boarders we don't pay extra and neither does our trainer. Non-boarders have to pay an arena fee but the trainer still does not pay extra. Non-boarders can use the cross-ties if they are vacant. Since we are a small barn it is normally not a problem. We have a calendar that we mark upcoming lessons or events so no one bumps in to each other. Our barn policy is that you can ride during someone else's lesson as long as you are courteous.

We do not have an in-house barn trainer and no offense to trainers out there but we hope to never have one again. We enjoy being able to bring in who we want, when we want, without an in-house ego getting in the way. The in-house trainer just vacated the barn and things have been quiet and drama free since. We plan on keeping it that way.

Vibrant
Nov. 11, 2009, 04:37 PM
My barn is open (no in-house trainer). We have about 5 trainers that do the majority of the lessons (I would estimate that ~20% of the entire barn clientele take lessons), and 3 or 4 that only work with one or two clients each. The BO's main rules are that instructors can only do private lessons, only one instructor may teach in a given hour slot, and instructors pay a $5/hour ring fee (billed monthly). Some pass this on to their students and some don't. Due to the size of the facility and number of trainers, we do have a pretty structured lesson scheduling protocol.

To answer the OP, my trainer comes to me for the same rate as if we were to trailer to her.

goeslikestink
Nov. 11, 2009, 07:17 PM
This is for the riders who have their horses at home or board at a different barn then their trainer. Do they come to your house (barn) or do you trailer to them? I don't know how to do a poll, sorry, that would be easier. Also what do you pay? Is there a price difference between the two? TIA. :yes:

both

goeslikestink
Nov. 11, 2009, 07:18 PM
both- sometimes i go to the trianers sometimes i have them at home and soemtimes i go to top yard so i have more than one option

Pocket Pony
Nov. 12, 2009, 08:24 PM
I go to her. Her arena is covered and much larger than mine - I appreciate having such a big space to work in! She owns the property and has her own horses and just one boarder. Everyone else trailers in for lessons - most people in my area keep their horses at home.

Dressage_Julie
Nov. 13, 2009, 10:15 AM
Our trainer comes to us, we try to set up at least 4 lessons for him so it is worth it for him to make the 1 hour+ drive depending on Chicago traffic. Some in the area, will actually travel to our barn in order to get the lessons from him too, because our barn is closer to them than his.

Lisa Cook
Nov. 13, 2009, 12:12 PM
For those that go to your trainer's, and your trainer is also the BO or BM where you take your horse to, is it customary for them to charge a haul-in or ring fee since you are a non-boarder? I would think not, but I just wanted to see.

Do you get a set of cross-ties in the barn where you can tack up? Or do you tie your horse to the trailer to tack up? I'm just picturing when daylight savings time goes, I'll be doing evening lessons and it will be DARK! Just wondering how these things typically work!

For the first part of the question...I trailer out to a total of 4 instructors (it takes a village to keep me on track...and I'm an eventer, so different disciplines). The 2 instructors that own their own facility charge no extra fee for trailering in. The 2 instructors that teach at a facility that they do not own, I owe a $10 trailer-in fee, payable to that facility.

In terms of tacking up....I try to be very conscientious to work out of my trailer as much as possible, and that includes tacking/untacking in the dark. With that being said, every instructor, without fail, has been more than gracious in offering me their wash racks, cross ties, even a stall. But I don't assume I have a right to any of the above when trailering to another facility.