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pony hunter - xo
Sep. 5, 2009, 10:52 AM
I have a 5 yr old gelding who hates having his mane pulled. Even if I just pull out one strand at a time, he still freaks out. Right now his mane is about six (maybe a little more) inches long and super thick (like double a normal thickness) and pulling it seems to be out of the question :( He needs to have a braidable mane two weeks from today. Any suggestions?

Come Shine
Sep. 5, 2009, 11:04 AM
I love my solo comb. My pony hates having her mane pulled but she does not mind this at all. Took about 20 minutes to have a braidable mane. Be careful and do it as instructed. Here is a pic of the finished braids.
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=1824904&l=4673b0f30d&id=705386256

birdsong
Sep. 5, 2009, 11:05 AM
Try this...flip the mane to the off side and trim with thinning shears. when you flip it back it doesn't have that just cut look. I do pull the manes but when I'm lazy or rushed I have found this works for us.

make x it x so
Sep. 5, 2009, 11:14 AM
My horse doesn't like having his mane pulled, either. I always do it after he was ridden so the pores are open and everything, but as I'm pulling it he gets more and more agitated and has come close to ripping cross-ties down to avoid the dreaded mane pulling.

Then, one day, I decided to try it in his stall. I tied him (with a safety knot, of course) to one of the bars on his stall, and started pulling, and voila- a well-behaved horse! I don't know if he just knew there was nowhere to move forward/back up to or what, but the difference was incredible. He still shook his head and was a little fussy, but he didn't go as crazy as he has gone on cross ties.

If your horse REALLY hates it, this may not work, but it's worth a try.

SkipChange
Sep. 5, 2009, 11:46 AM
I rarely "pull" my horses' manes anymore. I take the hair in a small section, scrunch it up like I'm about to pull. Instead of pulling it out I take a loose clipper blade and cut that section. You can cut it closer to the base for thick manes and leave it a bit longer for thinner manes, so I can get a really even looking mane with this method. It actually works pretty well, similar action to the solo comb I think.

My old trainer used this method and manes were perfectly braid-able. I also second the idea of doing it after you ride and the pores are open, plus horse is a bit tired/relaxed.

PNWjumper
Sep. 5, 2009, 12:26 PM
I live by my solo comb :)

I tried ordering this:
http://www.manepuller.com/

But it's "painless" in the same way that the epilady is a "quick and painless" way to get rid of leg hair :lol: Total bust on my sensitive TB who has the hair of 4 horses and a massive aversion to having anything pulled from him!

maxdog
Sep. 5, 2009, 12:31 PM
I rarely "pull" my horses' manes anymore. I take the hair in a small section, scrunch it up like I'm about to pull. Instead of pulling it out I take a loose clipper blade and cut that section. You can cut it closer to the base for thick manes and leave it a bit longer for thinner manes, so I can get a really even looking mane with this method. It actually works pretty well, similar action to the solo comb I think.

My old trainer used this method and manes were perfectly braid-able. I also second the idea of doing it after you ride and the pores are open, plus horse is a bit tired/relaxed.
This is the way to go. So much easier, the horses don't get annoyed and it looks fine. Good luck!

grandprixjump
Sep. 5, 2009, 01:45 PM
You could do ATTITUDE ADJUSTMENT thru Modern Pharmaceuticals. Not saying this is the best alternative, but sometimes the only way. I personally HATE cut manes, they might look good right after you do them, but as they grow back, they get all kinds of stray hairs growing every way, but the right way.

A few years ago I had to body clip a horse that actually got the same meds a stallion gets for cutting them. Lights on but NOBODY home for 1 hour.. LOL LOL. I wanted to stay alive and he HAD to be clipped....

Pony Soprano
Sep. 5, 2009, 01:49 PM
I am hooked on the solo comb also. I had a horse that would loose it when we just combed his mane, much less even considered pulling it and this was the only solution. Thinking back on it, I believe his mane had been cut when he arrived. hmmm.....I even use it on ones that are good to pull because it is so much faster.

florida foxhunter
Sep. 5, 2009, 01:56 PM
I also love my solo comb,. It may take you some time to get your horses trust....as I backcomb just like I"m going to pull it, but then push the button to cut it instead. At first the horse is afraid you're going to pull........and you have to convince him otherwise.

I don't think they're as good for "thinning".........

I also try not to use it on one that is going to be braided at a show. BRAIDERS, DO YOU FIND IT HARDER TO BRAID AFTER A SOLO COMB RATHER THAN A REAL MANE PULLING?

PNWjumper
Sep. 5, 2009, 02:36 PM
BRAIDERS, DO YOU FIND IT HARDER TO BRAID AFTER A SOLO COMB RATHER THAN A REAL MANE PULLING?

I haven't braided anyone for years, but I can say that I wouldn't use a solo comb on a horse I was going to braid. It does a decent job thinning if you use it carefully (making sure to backcomb all the way up to the base of the mane), but I think that a real pulled mane is much easier to braid. I'm sure if you were meticulous enough with it you could prepare it decently enough for an okay braiding job, but even growing back a solo-combed mane is a little more difficult than a real pulled mane.

But for basic mane maintenance (or is that manetenance? :D) I think it's brilliant and MUCH easier than pulling a difficult horse's mane!

Seven-up
Sep. 5, 2009, 02:49 PM
BRAIDERS, DO YOU FIND IT HARDER TO BRAID AFTER A SOLO COMB RATHER THAN A REAL MANE PULLING?

The braider we used would go ballistic as soon as she started working on a solocomb-ed or cut mane. She could tell by the time she finished the first braid. In between strings of swear words, she would say, "If you can't pull it, leave it alone and I'll do it myself. But if you ever use scissors again I'll kill you." :winkgrin: (I had one horse who was downright dangerous to pull, so I teased like I was pulling, but only cut a few hairs at a time. You couldn't tell just looking at it, but oh, boy did it make a difference to our braider.)

I've had this discussion before, and some people say it doesn't matter, but after seeing pictures of their braids, :eek: well, let's just say I'm gonna listen to the braider who does braids for Dover magazine.



Since I don't need to braid any time soon, I use the clipper blade method on my mare who will stomp me into the ground if I come at her with a pulling comb. When it comes time to pull it for real, I imagine I'll have to employ the modern pharmeceuticals like someone else suggested.

EiRide
Sep. 5, 2009, 02:59 PM
Put Ambesol, you know, that numbing stuff for your gums when you have a canker sore or bad tooth, on the base of the mane where you are pulling. Works a treat for a lot of horses.

Midge
Sep. 5, 2009, 03:25 PM
BRAIDERS, DO YOU FIND IT HARDER TO BRAID AFTER A SOLO COMB RATHER THAN A REAL MANE PULLING?

YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Midge
Sep. 5, 2009, 03:44 PM
If your horse has an overly thick mane, there is no substitute for pulling. The only way to avoid pulling and still have a braidable mane is to shave off the top side, not the underneath. Once you shave, you have to do it all the time.

That said, I cannot count the number of times someone has told me, "Dobbin's mane CANNOT be pulled, he hates it so much." and I proceed to pull it after a short conversation with Dobbin. One of you just has to want your way more than the other.

The best thing to do is to pull it every day. One hair a day, if that is all you can do. If your horse ever has to be tranquilized, take advantage and give him a good mane pulling. Try not to do one huge pulling at one time. If you pull it all out at the same time, it all grows back at the same time.

Also, some COTH BB rocket surgeons will tell you your mane should be four, or five or six inches long. There is no single correct length. On one horse, four inches is too short, on another, it's too long. Your horse's mane length is related to it's thickness. The thicker the mane, the longer it has to be. Most braiders prefer 'too much' to 'not enough'.

If you REALLY cannot pull it, do NOT cut it off. If you asked me to braid your unpulled mane, I might give it a whirl. I won't even bite if you cut it.

Solo comb, Mane Master, etc., should come with a warning label. "Use on thin manes only!"

Blue Bunny
Sep. 5, 2009, 05:47 PM
I don't know, but maybe some horses feel pain when the mane is pulled?
I've had a few that would throw a hissy fit. I like to use a solo comb or thinning shears on the problem horses.:D

December
Sep. 5, 2009, 06:03 PM
I've had good luck with Chloraseptic (numbing sore-throat spray). Works the same way as the Anbesol, but in spray form. My daughter's horse needs a chain on the gums. Sounds barbaric, I know, but we keep the session short and it keeps her very still.

spmoonie
Sep. 5, 2009, 07:21 PM
I like the idea of the clipper blade, but I absolutely hate the solo comb. Made my guy's mane look like a 4 year old did it. He has a REALLY thick mane though. I would not reccommend it. I have had good luck cutting VERY, VERY carefully.

Peggy
Sep. 5, 2009, 08:36 PM
If it's thick and you want decent braids (esp the next time) you're going to have to pull. If the horse won't stand, try some sort of restraint and/or get help from one of those knowledgeable friends the magazine articles always seem to refer to. If they're really bad and you need to have it done sooner, rather than later, it's probably going to involve drugs or two people--one to back the horse into a corner and restrain it using suitable tools and the other to pull as fast as they can. Either of these should be done more than a day or two before the show--drugs b/c of the testing rules (esp if you live in CA:lol:) and restraint b/e the horse is probably going to remember how he was treated the last time someone came near his mane and be bad for the braider.

Treasmare2
Sep. 5, 2009, 08:48 PM
I have not tried it but have been told that putting some of that liquid tooth ache stuff on the crest before pulling helps.

TheOneandOnly
Sep. 5, 2009, 08:53 PM
Have you tried a twitch yet? Worked wonders for my TB =]

copper1
Sep. 6, 2009, 08:29 AM
MY TB gelding loses it big time if you even pretend to pull his mane! A lip chain is all it takes for him to stand like a perfect gentleman! Naturally these bad boys always have very thick manes!

fourmares
Sep. 6, 2009, 01:36 PM
Wow, we're on the second page and not one person has suggested the quickest, easiest and most obvious solution. Roach it. Shave it right to the neck. Then for the show all you have to do is braid the forlock and the tail if you want to and your ready to go. Most people won't even notice it's not braided. The judge will not care one way or the other. And your horse will be happy.

411
Sep. 6, 2009, 07:53 PM
I use a bot knife on my horse. He can't stand having his mane pulled and this works well. :yes:

Princess Lauren
Sep. 6, 2009, 08:42 PM
You have to pull it. No clipper blades or silly thinning combs. Have the vet out to give it something. My horse is a terror about getting his mane pulled, he'll throw you across the stall. Rompin works perfectly for him, gives me about 15-20 minutes to super speed pull his mane.

DancingQueen
Sep. 6, 2009, 11:51 PM
As a lot of people have already said, twitch, lipchain and if that doesn't help, drugs.
I wouldn't personally roach a mane on a horse unless that was part of the fashion in the divisions I was showing in.
If the mane is thin you could probably get away with a good scissor/thinner job but it's not reccomended unless the mane is really thin to start out.

My one piece of advice is to try pulling the mane, perhaps with a twich handy, just after you ride him and he's really hot. The hairs will come out a little easier on a hot horse and he's tired from the work and might not fuzz quite as much.

You mention that his mane has to be pulled in 2 weeks time. Are you showing? Braiding? Get a braider, tell them he needs his mane pulled (you will have to pay extra) and let them deal with pulling the mane when you aren't there. They have all kinds of tricks up their sleeves and will most likely get it done. You can always throw them an extra tweeter after all is said and done to cover the wounds!

Outside of that, you knoe your horse is a PITA with manepulling, pull it whenever he gets his teeth done and is drugged anyways, weather he needs it or not. He will probably get better in time, less sensitive and regular pullings will make the mane easier as well.

Good Luck!

Midge
Sep. 7, 2009, 07:38 AM
Wow, we're on the second page and not one person has suggested the quickest, easiest and most obvious solution. Roach it. Shave it right to the neck. Then for the show all you have to do is braid the forlock and the tail if you want to and your ready to go. Most people won't even notice it's not braided. The judge will not care one way or the other. And your horse will be happy.


Horsie won't be happy in fly season!

ZoZo
Sep. 7, 2009, 08:03 AM
I second the lip chain. Works like a charm for my guy who tries to get away with anything he can. I also agree with doing it daily so your horse realizes it's part of his routine and just accepts it.

Best of luck!

lauriep
Sep. 7, 2009, 12:41 PM
Wow, we're on the second page and not one person has suggested the quickest, easiest and most obvious solution. Roach it. Shave it right to the neck. Then for the show all you have to do is braid the forlock and the tail if you want to and your ready to go. Most people won't even notice it's not braided. The judge will not care one way or the other. And your horse will be happy.

Oh, please. A roached mane is not acceptable in the hunter ring. Period.

What Midge and Peggy said. A thick mane has to be pulled. Drugs, or very firm restraint, or both, are NOT torture and the horse will be just fine. I pull probably a hundred manes a year, maybe more, and most of them dislike it. But it gets done and my braider(s) love me. I also teach my babies that they MUST stand for the braider, too. And they do.

r3dd0g
Sep. 7, 2009, 04:18 PM
One of the braiders taught me to pull the mane with an old clipper blade in place of a comb. Thins and shortens the mane and makes it easy to braid. I've tried the tooth-ache gel and it does help, but some horses still tense up when they think you're about to yank the hair.

lauriep
Sep. 7, 2009, 05:08 PM
The clipper blade method doesn't truly thin a mane like pulling. It will work on a thin to medium mane, but if the OP's mane is as thick as she describes, sorry, the only way is to pull.

cyberbay
Sep. 8, 2009, 08:38 AM
May not make a difference immediately to the confirmed mane-pulling haters, but after mane hair is wrapped around comb, pull directly up from top of mane. Not down toward you. This trick seems to work on some horses. Also, as others have mentioned, less hair at a time than more.

Bravestrom
Sep. 8, 2009, 09:07 AM
This is almost my number one reason for disliking the hunter world. What is so bad with thick braids. We do the dressage button braids and they can be done with any thickness of mane.

I've said it before and I will say it again - mane pulling is inhumane - flame suit on.

SkipChange
Sep. 8, 2009, 11:03 AM
This is almost my number one reason for disliking the hunter world. What is so bad with thick braids. We do the dressage button braids and they can be done with any thickness of mane.

I've said it before and I will say it again - mane pulling is inhumane - flame suit on.

People hate thick braids? I thought people liked nice full braids...but they want a lot of them and they should be with using small sections so you end up with zillions of braids. Hunter braids don't look good if the hair is thin and scraggly. Do you do dressage buttons at hunter shows? I can do both types of braids but I feel like the hunters look much nicer with millions of small braids. Nothing against dressage button braids as I will do those, if the horse is about to go do dressage. In England they do button braids on all the horses it seems, they were shocked when I demostrated "hunter" braids. Me I will stick to my hunter braids.

But then again, I personally don't actually pull manes much since I'm a fan of the comb and clipper blade method.

VA_Hunter_Aside
Sep. 8, 2009, 02:34 PM
My gelding is a typical sensitive chestnut TB. Complete with crappy feet a thick mane and a thin tail. After a few years of attempted pulling I asked my friend who clips and pulls to do it with her good drugs. She said she didn't think he needed Dorm and that she would just ACE him. Knowing that would not do, I protested but she insisted. She gave him a healthy dose and he looked like he was going to fall over. She gets up on her stool and goes for the first section. As soon as she started back combing his head snapped up so fast. I snapped a lead rope on him and tried to keep him still but since he couldn't get her off by shaking his head he tried to stomp me. I have never before and never since seen a hose get one front leg so high in the air with the other leg still on the ground. He actually pulled a muscle in his chest with that stunt. Poor baby, I felt so awful. Somehow she kept going and made it super short so we wouldn't have to do it again. After only two or three pulls she said "You were right, I should have iven him the dorm". That was the last time his mane was pulled (3 years ago). I don't have a solo comb but I'm really good with the thinning shears and the cheapo plastic mane combs with the razor on one side. I don't show him so I don't have to worry about braiding.

My mare is OK for pulling except for the last 1/4 near her withers. That section I have to do that same way as my gelding. My pony is the only one who doesn't mind one bit.

BridalBridle
Sep. 8, 2009, 04:28 PM
I used to own(and am SO not a hairdresser...was an investment) a beauty parlor. In the 80's I had a horse that used to throw me on the ground she hated pulling so much. So I got the manager of the shop who had never seen a horse before to try and fix it. She said in order to give "whispy" bangs to women she pulls the hair out back and cuts across...it lands in a shag form.
SO she said comb the hair wet straight up and back towards the off side and CUT IT OFF. When it goes back over to the near side it looks great. When u have done the whole mane comb it over to the near side and cut in vertically towards the crest in small choppy cuts and it helps thin and evens out the line a bit. It really works and I don't pull any more manes at all. They all are cut to save even the ones who tolerate it, the agony....also it looks tidy.

pony hunter - xo
Sep. 8, 2009, 09:44 PM
Thanks everyone!

I think any form of cutting it is out since his mane is so thick and I want it to be braidable. I'm going to try a combination of methods tomorrow, riding him before, using a haynet, getting someone else to hold him (possibly with some harsher restraining devices) and I bought some of that sore throat spray. I might not be able to pull it as much as I want but hopefully it'll be a little more manageable.

No offense, but I definetly think it wouldn't go unnoticed if I roached it....:lol: