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EquitationRider
Sep. 5, 2009, 08:48 AM
Im 13 and im in desperate need for money to pay for lessons. My parents pay for shows/clinics/ect, but they said i need to start pulling my weight because money is getting tight. The summer was very busy! I've talked to my trainor and i do get money off my show bill for working and stuff and i'm out there as much as i can helping out, but i need cash. I can't get a job, and i dont live in a neighborhood, i live in the middle of no where so pet sitting, car wash, all that stuff would be hard. I'm going to try to babysit but im not safe sitter certified, but im going to try.
Any other ideas?

Sing Mia Song
Sep. 5, 2009, 08:54 AM
Learn to braid. It requires a lot of practice to get really good at it, but it's a talent worth having. It both saves you money and makes you money.

EquitationRider
Sep. 5, 2009, 08:57 AM
Learn to braid. It requires a lot of practice to get really good at it, but it's a talent worth having. It both saves you money and makes you money.

i have tried to braid and i know a older teenager that knows how to braid. i have talked to her about me and she said she will teach me but it took her two years to learn!! lol im gonna give it a shot though.
I also know how to clip but im not very good yet but i help my assistant trainor clip the horses before shows

Mamy
Sep. 5, 2009, 09:04 AM
As a child I funded my lessons,and showing ( including clothes, tack, etc...) with babysitting. I started babysitting at 13. And still as an adult, I watch a 4 year old little girl to pay for my board.
If you need ideas on how to get your name out there, to babysit, let me know!

Heineken
Sep. 5, 2009, 10:10 AM
Equitation Rider,

To be taken seriously you'll need to work on your grammar, spelling and capitalization as well. I know it sounds mean but as a teacher, I would never hire someone who typed like you do to watch my children. So edit your posts and use a spell check. It will make you seem much more mature and people will be willing to take your efforts seriously.

spmoonie
Sep. 5, 2009, 10:25 AM
Im 15. I pay for ALL of my riding expenses except for 150$ a month board--my mom pays for the board-- (All vet bills, farrier, shows, lessons, clinics, supplements, and any other "extra" expenses). I have a job at a small barn right near my house (this is also where I keep my horse). I started working there when I was 12. I pick stalls, feed, water, general barn chores, and even get to ride a few of the horses to keep them exercised. It has worked out great for me.
From experience, it is your age that will be your biggest issue. People may not take you seriously. It can get really frustrating, but hang in there! :) If you cant get a steady job working at a barn, definitely learn to braid! You can make a lot of money doing that! Dont limit your options either. The barn I work at focusses mainly on AQHA type horses which, quite frankly, I hate; BUT it keeps my pony fed and keeps me going to shows. Even if it is a western pleasure barn, ask if they need any help feeding and such. You can learn a lot about good horsemanship and not so good horsemanship from working at different barns. Good luck!

PNWjumper
Sep. 5, 2009, 12:40 PM
When I was a kid (around 10) I started cleaning stalls in exchange for lessons. As I became a better rider I started riding for my trainer as well and traded the riding I was doing for all board and training fees. I braided at all of the big horseshows and came pretty close to paying all of my show fees via braiding. It did not take me two years to learn (maybe it would if you weren't motivated to get good at it!). It did take a lot of practice, but I would say that you could get decent enough to braid at lower level shows within a month or two? But again, I would imagine it comes down to how willing you are to really learn and get good at it.

My friends and I also used to put together little "packages" for people in the barn. We'd clean sheaths for $10, clean tack for $5-10, groom horses, hold horses for the vet and/or farrier, handwalk horses on lay-up, etc. Basically anything the owners might not want to do we would offer to do for money.

In addition I spent every minute not at the barn babysitting. I had a couple of people who used to come pick me up (and then take me home) to babysit. But you'd definitely be better served to get certified (CPR, etc.) for that these days.

And I agree with Heineken....to be taken seriously, work on your grammar, punctuation, and spelling. It will come in handy if you ever plan to advertise anything. I've seen flyers posted at my local feed store and I can say for sure that I have no interest in hiring someone who is too lazy to check (or have someone else check) their flyer before they post it. Same goes for e-mails and any other form of written communication.

WorthTheWait95
Sep. 5, 2009, 12:46 PM
When I was a kid (around 10) I started cleaning stalls in exchange for lessons. As I became a better rider I started riding for my trainer as well and traded the riding I was doing for all board and training fees. I braided at all of the big horseshows and came pretty close to paying all of my show fees via braiding. It did not take me two years to learn (maybe it would if you weren't motivated to get good at it!). It did take a lot of practice, but I would say that you could get decent enough to braid at lower level shows within a month or two? But again, I would imagine it comes down to how willing you are to really learn and get good at it.

My friends and I also used to put together little "packages" for people in the barn. We'd clean sheaths for $10, clean tack for $5-10, groom horses, hold horses for the vet and/or farrier, handwalk horses on lay-up, etc. Basically anything the owners might not want to do we would offer to do for money.

In addition I spent every minute not at the barn babysitting. I had a couple of people who used to come pick me up (and then take me home) to babysit. But you'd definitely be better served to get certified (CPR, etc.) for that these days.

And I agree with Heineken....to be taken seriously, work on your grammar, punctuation, and spelling. It will come in handy if you ever plan to advertise anything. I've seen flyers posted at my local feed store and I can say for sure that I have no interest in hiring someone who is too lazy to check (or have someone else check) their flyer before they post it. Same goes for e-mails and any other form of written communication.

This is what we would do as kids. My best friend and I talked to our trainer and then wrote up a price list with services. We offered everything from a full body clip to a whisker trim to hand walking/washing legs, cold hosing, sheath cleaning, wrapping etc, etc. Pretty much anything that needed to get done we would do for a reasonable price. It worked really well for us especially since the barn had many adult ammies that had full time jobs and families so not much time for all the extras.

I had to stop when I swapped barns shortly after since all of that was included in the full board by the grooms but it was nice while it lasted. Now that I'm older (in college) I started doing all of that again for some extra cash along with house/barn/pet sitting.

jn4jenny
Sep. 5, 2009, 01:39 PM
Im 13 and im in desperate need for mone to pay for lessons. My parents pay for shows/clinics/ect. but they said i need to start pulling my weight because they cant afford to pay for lessons anymore.

I'd suggest foregoing showing for a season or two in order to divert your parent's funds toward lessons. Showing is fun, but it's the riding lessons that will benefit you more in the long run. If you keep on showing without lessoning, you'll never get much better. I'd bet your trainer would let you work of your lessons (instead of your show bill) as well.


i have tried to braid and i know a older teenager that knows how to braid. i have talked to her about me and she said she will teach me but it took her two years to learn!! lol im gonna give it a shot though.

It probably took her two years because she only did it at shows. Get your trainer to loan you an old, complacent horse who doesn't mind standing still for hours on end. Braid the horse, then unbraid it. Repeat many times, daily, until you get it. Once you get pretty good, take pictures of your work and bring them to local shows; then hang flyers advertising to braid for far less than the going rate because you are "new to braiding but committed to quality work". Before you know it, you'll have quite a clientele.

I don't know what "safe sitter certified" means, but even if you're not certified, you can probably be a "mother's helper". It won't pay as well as babysitting, but even $5 to $8 per hour would mean 3-4 hours per week = one riding lesson per week.

Sell stuff. I'm sure your parents would love to help you sell Breyer horses or other valuable toys/possessions on Ebay.

Offer to make sacrifices when your parents offer to buy you something. For example, if they offer to buy you a cute new shirt at the store, say, "I love the shirt but I'd rather save that money for a riding lesson." They'll be impressed and will probably give you the money.

Think outside the box about ways you could "barter" money with your parents. Here's some simple ideas to jog your mind, but think about what would work for your situation:
1. Offer to clip money saving coupons on Sundays for products that you know your parents already buy at the grocery. Ask for a cut of the profits--for example, if you clip a 50 cent off coupon and your parents agree that they're likely to use that coupon, ask for 10 or 25 cents in return.
2. If your parents are in the habit of driving you somewhere that's close enough by to bike, ride your bike and ask your parents for the difference in gas money. If you don't live close enough but you can be dropped off in a safe neighborhood, put the bike in the car and bike from a few blocks away (and again, ask for the gas money).

You can also make money filling in surveys online. As a teen, you are a valuable marketing commodity and companies will pay you about $10/hour to tell them what you think. 13 y.o. is usually the minimum age. For example: http://www.squidoo.com/Jobsforteensunder18

touchstone-
Sep. 5, 2009, 01:59 PM
Another vote for braiding. There are simply few jobs in existence that pay as well as braiding does. And you will be able to get work if you do a good job and prove reliable. AND it can fit into your showing schedule, provided you can operate on just a little sleep.

It doesn't take two years, but it does take practice and the advice of someone really skilled. The teenager nearby who does it a little may not be good enough to get your braids to professional quality. My advice would be to learn from this person, practice a TON and then try to approach a pro braider at a show and ask to pay that person for a few pointers.

unclewiggly
Sep. 5, 2009, 02:16 PM
Cleaning tack for the other boarders @ your barn....offer a sort of concierge program.
Having their horses groomed, tacked, feet picked out and waiting for them when they arrive. You will need a cell phone and ask for 45 minutes notice.
Alot of busy adults would love some customized service @ a reasonable fee.
The thing is you have to BE THERE.
Also holiday gift wrapping, and if you are good @ any subject in school some sort of tutoring.
With the holidays approaching babysitting tailered to holiday shopping and holiday parties.
While not all year round you can rack up the $$$ save for lessons.

iridehorses
Sep. 5, 2009, 02:58 PM
work at your barn. not only will this give you money, but this will also give you experience. let people at your barn know that you can baby sit, pet sit, get the mail for them while theyre gone, what ever!!! do anything and everything you possibly can.
Be at the barn as much as possible, clean stalls, feed, groom, and help whoever is doing those jobs if you are not, so that your trainer knows you can handle the responsiblity.
BRAID!!! braiding will save you money, and make you money.

ReSomething
Sep. 5, 2009, 03:50 PM
The horse was at home and we had a ton of manure so I bagged it in the leftover feed bags and sold it to the local gardeners as well as tomato starts.
I'd skip showing and trade the work time for lessons, but go to the show as a go-fer for the trainer. Even as an adult I get pressed into service doing horse care at busy shows, final prep powdering socks, wiping down tack and boots, walking with the little kids to and from the arena when the trainer has two classes back to back.
Lots of good ideas here, good luck.

superpony123
Sep. 5, 2009, 04:10 PM
if you can't afford the lessons right now but can afford the shows--stop showing for the fall/winter and have parents pay for lessons while you find a job

sorry, it's going to be hard -- no one will take you seriously because youre 13. that's life. i'm 17. i know when i was 13 i thought it was so cruel that people couldn't take me seriously, but now i know why--heck, there are some 8 year olds at my barn that are more mature than the 13 yr olds. some of the 12/13's are also great kids and very respectful and i always take them seriously.

keep doing barn work. try personal barn services too, such as braiding, clipping, tack cleaning, show baths, etc. as for braiding--it should not take someone 2 yrs to get the hang of it if they practice consistantly. that being said, i learned to braid years ago and i still suck at it--but that's because i hire a braider when i go to the big shows and i never find the time to practice my braids. get the book Grooming to Win. it teaches you all the different types of braids, as well as how to do quarter marks, and other grooming things. offer to be the groom when you go to horse shows! you will make money that way generally by hour and you'll probably get some tips from the people showing.

non-horsey jobs that you could do:
- babysitting- not fun, but that's generally what kids your age do for money
- dog walking
- pet sitting
- yard work (could be a broad range of things. maybe you aren;t willing to push a lawn mower around, but you could offer help with garden care -- deadheading plants, pulling weeds, watering and feeding them, general gardencare. and since it's fall, many people are starting to plant their fall bulbs, which is a fairly tedious job but simple enough -- you dig a hole to a certain depth and put the bulb in. you're done--it's just tedious because it's usually a few hundred bulbs.)

another good idea is selling stuff on ebay. have your parents create a paypal/ebay account. go through your room and find things that you don't want. (also clean out the tack trunk! it's surprising how many useless things we all have in there that we won't need) and get rid of them! books, too. seriously, you would be surprised at the books you can sell. Do you have those silly useless books your parents have had around for years but never open and they clog up shelves in living rooms and basements? they always seem to be about art or interior design or landscape. old cook books, too. I went through my basement and listed our old useless books like that on amazon.com and ebay (amazon.com is better for books though) and holy cow, i got hundreds from that :eek: all i kept thinking was "i can't imagine why this person would pay $30 for this specific old landscaping book, but hey i'm getting money!" it turns out that these things usually were gifts of some sort, for whatever reason. so you're making money and not just getting it back :) old novels that you don't want to reread are good too. CDs. little collectibles. jewelry. old clothes. all of this can be sold for a surprising amount when it's in good condition. give it a try!

i try to sell all my stuff that i don't need online, as well as being a working student and doing personal barn favors for people, and i make enough money to support my pony.

EquitationRider
Sep. 5, 2009, 04:51 PM
Thanks everyone! Keep ideas coming.
About my speeling/grammer, I rushed through this post this morning before I had to leave, I promise you my spelling and grammer is not as bad as it is seen here. :)

I am definitly going to learn how to braid! I'm going to make some babysitting posters and hope for the best!

Any other ideas?

Star Creek
Sep. 5, 2009, 05:11 PM
Thanks everyone! Keep ideas coming.
About my speeling/grammer, I rushed through this post this morning before I had to leave, I promise you my spelling and grammer is not as bad as it is seen here. :)

I am definitly going to learn how to braid! I'm going to make some babysitting posters and hope for the best!

Any other ideas?

Speeling ??? Grammer ???

Oh pumpkin, you're going to have a hard time with this all if you don't even notice that you have spelled both spelling and grammar incorrectly. Definitely learn how to spell "definitely" correctly too. Might be that incorrectly spelled words show up on your computer with a dotted red line underneath them. If they do, pay close attention to that and fix the incorrect spellings you see.

Incorrect spelling and poor grammar really do make people appear ignorant, even if they are not. With so much communication occurring by email these days, you really must use the spell check.

Good luck with your job search !

EquitationRider
Sep. 5, 2009, 05:22 PM
Speeling ??? Grammer ???

Oh pumpkin, you're going to have a hard time with this all if you don't even notice that you have spelled both spelling and grammar incorrectly. Definitely learn how to spell "definitely" correctly too. Might be that incorrectly spelled words show up on your computer with a dotted red line underneath them. If they do, pay close attention to that and fix the incorrect spellings you see.

Incorrect spelling and poor grammar really do make people appear ignorant, even if they are not. With so much communication occurring by email these days, you really must use the spell check.

Good luck with your job search !

Seriously! Again, Spelling and Grammer. I'm really a good at spelling and such but not at typing!

EiRide
Sep. 5, 2009, 05:42 PM
Any other ideas?

My nephew has allergies and was dying to have a dog, but needed something from a breeder like a Poodle or Portuguese Water Dog. When he was maybe 9 or 10 he asked for a patch of yard, turned it into quite a large garden, and grew vegetables that he sold on the corner to folks coming home from work. He earned enough for his dog, and later he funded his X Box, phone, IPod, and computer with his now quite extensive and diverse garden.

It takes a lot of work to keep a really good garden--I sure have the black thumb--but it's done wonders for my nephew all these years.

I mucked stalls, cleaned tack, groomed, did hand walking, longed obese small ponies, was a polo pony groom, painted jumps, stained fences, cobwebbed the barn . . . that worked out as lessons in trade for me.

Also, I would recommend if it is an either/or situation, you use lesson money now and earn show money for future. Without lessons your riding will tat apart.

Star Creek
Sep. 5, 2009, 06:37 PM
Seriously! Again, Spelling and Grammer. I'm really a good at spelling and such but not at typing!

It is grammar, not "er".


On the job front, I worked in family businesses from the time I was eleven. I would do all the grunt work that no one else wanted to do. Swept floors, stuffed envelopes, cleaned and the like. Worked nearly full time in the summers (when I wasn't riding or competing) and part-time after school the rest of the year.

Again, good luck.

Remember, spell check is your friend.

EquitationRider
Sep. 5, 2009, 06:51 PM
Thanks.
I think im going to buy a dictionary as soon as I get some money!

jn4jenny
Sep. 5, 2009, 07:28 PM
Thanks.
I think im going to buy a dictionary as soon as I get some money!

Dear, there are free dictionaries online. www.dictionary.com and www.m-w.com among others.

In the meantime, try typing all of your COTH posts in Microsoft Word. MS Word's spelling and grammar check is not flawless, but it's a good start.

JenEM
Sep. 5, 2009, 07:43 PM
Or use Firefox, which spellchecks for you ;)

I feel you, OP, because as a kid, I had to pay for my horse habit myself. At your age, you should be able to start doing some babysitting. Maybe your parents have some coworkers with younger kids they could recommend you to. I'd think they would be happy to help, since you're showing some initiative to helping out financially.

Braiding is a good skill to learn, regardless of whether you're going to get paid to do it, because it can save you some money at shows if you're at least good enough to braid for yourself. It shouldn't take two years, but it will take a lot of practice. Try braiding a little every day you're out at the barn, and it will start to get easier.

rugbygirl
Sep. 5, 2009, 08:03 PM
I liked the idea of offering "packages" to people at the barn. I'm an adult ammy, I'd pay you sums of money to do things like give my horse a thorough grooming or clean all my tack carefully! Another service Adults would find useful is your offering to catch/hold their horses for vet and farrier appointments (if the trainer allows it).

Offer other services to your trainer as well, in trade for lessons. I know that my trainer gives free lessons to the girls who will agree to help out in other lessons (Jump crew, Adult Ammy yeller-atter :D )

Another option for your baby-sitting might be to offer a regular child-minding service AT the barn. If there's some kind of lounge or visitor's area, you might be able to set up some colouring tables/kids' books etc. and offer to watch the children of people riding. It's also not strictly baby-sitting, the parents are THERE, but it might be convenient if there are moms at your barn! It could save them having to find a sitter. Things might start slow, but if you prove yourself to be competent and reliable, you might get a little business on the go! And reading to little kids will be a big help on the spelling and grammar front ;) you retain the highest percentage of things you TEACH rather than things you read about or even do.

EquitationRider
Sep. 5, 2009, 08:18 PM
Thanks everybody!
A lot of the things you have mentioned s stuff I already do for free. (i.e. muck out stalls, clean tack/horses, water horses, hose arena, jump crew, ect) I also watch the younger kids when their parents are at the barn, riding, or whatever.
Anymore ideas?

Hunter Mom
Sep. 5, 2009, 08:48 PM
Dear, there are free dictionaries online. www.dictionary.com and www.m-w.com among others.

In the meantime, try typing all of your COTH posts in Microsoft Word. MS Word's spelling and grammar check is not flawless, but it's a good start.

Or download the Google toolbar which has a spell checker for forms.

Hunter Mom
Sep. 5, 2009, 08:50 PM
Another option for your baby-sitting might be to offer a regular child-minding service AT the barn. If there's some kind of lounge or visitor's area, you might be able to set up some colouring tables/kids' books etc. and offer to watch the children of people riding. It's also not strictly baby-sitting, the parents are THERE, but it might be convenient if there are moms at your barn! It could save them having to find a sitter. Things might start slow, but if you prove yourself to be competent and reliable, you might get a little business on the go! And reading to little kids will be a big help on the spelling and grammar front ;) you retain the highest percentage of things you TEACH rather than things you read about or even do.

I do this. When DD and I aren't riding in the same lesson, one of the girls at the barn watches her. I toss her some $$ for, her time, DD is thrilled to hang out with her and I don't have to stop mid-lesson to do something with Pony. Win-win-win!

Horseshowaddict
Sep. 5, 2009, 09:12 PM
Another vote for learning how to braid and clip (trimming and body clipping) well! You really dont need much talent or money to be VERY good at these two things and they pay VERY VERY well! I made most of my money for showing, clinics, additional lessons and "extras" by braiding at the shows in my area. The great thing is, I learned these SKILLS out of necessity. It was all my parents and I could do to pay the bills for shows, forget about hiring someone to body clip my horse, or a braider. The first time I did either of these things, they did not look beautiful. But I practiced a TON! Mainly on school horses, or something that was laid up at the barn. I now work for a top AA show barn that actually still hires other people to clip and braid the horses, however I have been asked to do the occasional odd horse (we only have 1 that needs to be braided, or we have the one odd horse that grows hair 5x as fast as all of the others) and it really pays off to be able to say "Sure, I can do that".

I remember struggling at your age to find a job as well. It is really frustrating to be in that 11-15 year old range. Hang in there and dont get frustrated.

EquitationRider
Sep. 5, 2009, 10:13 PM
Thanks!
I think that I'm going to try braiding. Does anyone know of any good books or websites that tell how and how to get started. Thanks again!!!

spmoonie
Sep. 5, 2009, 10:14 PM
Thanks!
I think that I'm going to try braiding. Does anyone know of any good books or websites that tell how and how to get started. Thanks again!!!

Lucky Braids sells a dvd. It is kind of pricey. I have heard great things about it though!

Limerick
Sep. 5, 2009, 11:07 PM
This is the website for Lucky Braids: http://www.luckybraids.com/

As a mom of two kids, I encourage you to set up some kind of "Kids Club" at your barn. You could supervise a small group of preschoolersyoung kids and have them do various, safe activities in the barn lounge like listen to stories, do coloring pages, do scavenger hunts, etc. If your barn owner approves, it might be a really nice way for the moms to get together and ride and know their kids have an activity they enjoy.


Good luck-I hope you make lots of money!! :)

PNWjumper
Sep. 5, 2009, 11:50 PM
Thanks everybody!
A lot of the things you have mentioned s stuff I already do for free. (i.e. muck out stalls, clean tack/horses, water horses, hose arena, jump crew, ect) I also watch the younger kids when their parents are at the barn, riding, or whatever.
Anymore ideas?

Some of these things are fine to do for free. But you should not be cleaning stalls or watering/feeding horses for free. That should come off of your board if you're not getting paid for it in cash. You are paying someone to provide those services for your horse, and if you're doing it yourself (AND doing it for other people) then you shouldn't have to pay for it. I understand the idea of trying to be helpful, but if you do all of the stuff you list for free then you're being taken advantage of.

EmJae
Sep. 6, 2009, 02:15 AM
Some of these things are fine to do for free. But you should not be cleaning stalls or watering/feeding horses for free. That should come off of your board if you're not getting paid for it in cash. You are paying someone to provide those services for your horse, and if you're doing it yourself (AND doing it for other people) then you shouldn't have to pay for it. I understand the idea of trying to be helpful, but if you do all of the stuff you list for free then you're being taken advantage of.

I have to agree. It's unfortunate, but a lot of unscrupulous trainers will try to take advantage of your youth. As my mom always said, when you're dealing with someone older than you (i.e., more life experience), you're always going to be at a disadvantage.

It is important to appear willing and helpful, but you need to work something out. Just because you get appropriate compensation for the work you do does not mean that you're being difficult. I think you should probably talk to your parents about figuring out an appropriate amount that you should have negotiated to be taken off your board. However, keep in mind that if you're expecting the barn/trainer to deduct a certain amount that you'll need to be diligent about getting this done on the schedule the BO/trainer wants.